Tag Archives: #investigaction2013

The Art of Storytelling by Julie Knox #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX

… Live blogging from the Colombian Association for Marketing and Public Opinion Research in Bogoto, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • “death by powerpoint”
  • how do bring clients closer to customer and engage them with our work
  • there has always been distance between company and customer
  • traditional approaches are losing their ability engage… focus are a good example. we try to get marketers to come and watch focus groups to decrease the distance. But, the backroom is more often the backoffice – people arrive late, check their email, talk amongst themselves and enjoy the food and beverages. Fewer and fewer people are observing as more focus groups take place. The more groups a client sees, the less engaged they are.
  • presentations don’t always engage the audience, they’re too long, too rambling, too many charts. but we’re competing with more distractions – the phone, their email. imagine working from home where the dog is at your feet while you’re trying to watch a webex.
  • alternative approaches are many
  • tell clients better stories, use video to bring it alive, use customer immerision rooms
  • how to create a better narrative?
  • use classic story structures –
    • describe the problem and set the challenge to create a dramatic need to listen
    • describe the world and benefits if we can fix the probelm
    • take them on the journey
    • provide direction to make it happen
  • like journalists, use headlines to move the story along
  • provided a detailed analysis in the report but only show the story in the presentation. perhaps 1 slide is represents a full chapter
  • base the story around individuals we care about, not faceless numbers
  • strong headlines at the beginning and the end
  • optimize video, adds engagement to the audience, and engages with the findings, seeing people voice their opinions is more meaningful than reading their verbatims, consider video in situ – at the store, at the gas station. Use techniques from film makers but this does come at a price.
  • museum theory – immerse your clients/employees in experiences, set aside rooms and equip them with posters, charts, computers, interactive presentations. helps reach a wide internal audience, works best to create noise among employees. the employees set the pace themselves, browse the information at their leisure. you can bring in competitive data, secondary data, internal data means a 3d view from the consumers view.
  • how to make clients part of the story?
  • Swap shops – clients take the role of real customers in a focus group. Recruit the target audience, and give each client a biography and picture of a consumer. Give client time to ‘become’ the consumer. Now employees role-play that consumer. After the pretend group is finished, re-run the focus group with the real target group. Let’s clients see how their perceptions differed. It’s fun, engaging, eye opening, insightful. these are logistically complex. Only need to do it once with any client, element of surprise and power is gone by second time. [never heard of this before, anyone have experience with it?]
  • dragon’s den – clients explain propositions to consumers in pith elevator style pitches. customers then critique the pitches.
  • close encounters – have consumers help design the discussion guide, help run interviews, help analyze the data, help present the data.  its good for new product design, customer understanding. good for building ownership of results. be careful clients don’t run away with insights that aren’t generalizable.
  • concept nursery – best ideas are killed during research. recruit optimistic and articulate people from the target audience. educate them on how to be perfect responders – constructivism, anti-cynicism, understand the possibilities. Use breakout tasks and Q&A sessions to get clients to participate more. Good for development stages of ads/products. Good for engaging research allergic audiences. it nurtures creativity and is fun. be careful clients don’t run away with insights that aren’t generalizable.
  • benefits: all provide inspiration and trigger creativity. outcomes have more staying power with clients, more ‘sticky.’ generate a stronger sense of ownership among clients who are more energized to take the findings forward internally. provide eye opening moments of true insight.
  • limitations: clients’ misinterpretation of the overall findings and getting attached to their own findings, high energy and momentum  creates a lot of noise and then nothing happens, perhaps moving too much towards fun and entertainment and too far from research, devaluing research.
  • market research is the voice of the consumer and helps clients get closer to them, develop more empathy to the consumer
  • it sustains our expertise and credibility, utilizes our understanding of consumers, complementary tools in our portfolio
  • no one else is better placed to do this than market researchers

Neuroscience Scalable Marketing Solutions by Charles Spence #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX

… Live blogging from the Colombian Association for Marketing and Public Opinion Research in Bogota, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • successful new products appeal on both rational and emotional levels to as many senses as possible
  • how do you engage a tv in more than audio visual senses?  about opening the box has an olfactory experience as well, perhaps consider a branded smell [what the!?]
  • McGurk effect – visual illusion where looking at a person talking makes your brain interpret what you hear, you think you see them saying a certain sound but you don’t
  • the music you hear in a store affects the products you purchase – french music creates french wine purchases, ditto for german music and german wine. but people refuse to believe the music had any influence on their choice.
  • what do marketers do if the consumer doesn’t know why they make their decisions?
  • changing the fragrance of a shampoo makes people think the shampoo works better
  • where is the “buy” button in the brain?
  • fMRI is popular because it is colourful, lying in a scanner while a deafeningly loud machine watches you drink a beverage is not real  [HA HA!]
  • physiological measures becoming more popular – microexpressions, skin response, heart rate, pupil dilation, eye movements – these are challenging for real world applications
  • a manly shape to a bottle implies the product is strong, eg a squarish bottle versus one that is thinner at the middle
  • for every $2 increase in the price of a bottle of wine, the weight of the bottle increases by 8 grams, price doesn’t tell you which wine is better but which wine has a heavier bottle; even stronger for a tube of lipstick
  • perhaps make your packaging feel heavier even if you’re losing less packaging
  • the sound of chips crunching defines how we think they taste, how fresh we think they are – P&G wanted to know how they should change the sound of their chips
  • pens click when you open them, touching fabric creates a sound, spraying something creates a sound, some things should feel AND sound soft
  • restaurants can include the sounds and smells and sights relevant to the product, one restaurant even provides a headset for you to listen to while you eat and people perceive this food to taste better
  • a brain seeing a red drink or a blue drink decides on the flavour, the sweetness, and this differs by culture. A blue drink might make you think raspberry, mint, or mouthwash.
  • if you put chips in the wrong package, people are either confused or taste the flavour that it says on the bag
  • is it the plate or is it the food? the size and colour of the plate changes your experience of the food.
  • test the perceptions of different food colours by using augmented reality headsets that change the appearance of the colour for you
  • eye monitoring tells you where people look at a package – at the words, the pictures, the price?
  • putting your brand name on the narrow section of a bottle of shampoo means people are more likely to see the name – people always look at the narrow section first
  • new trend sweeping the UK is synaesthetic marketing – people who unconsciously associate a color or shape with a number or letter [Olive Sacks writes about this, really neat case studies]
  • most people do associate shapes and speech sounds – round shapes are soft letters, sharp shapes are angular letters. use these round and angular letters to describe your product.

Big Data and the Value of Social by Jeffrey Hunter #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX

… Live blogging from the Colombian Association for Marketing and Public Opinion Research in Bogota, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • [i feel bad for Jeffrey’s friend steve who is unhappy that he has to learn new methodologie 🙂 ]
  • Steve doesn’t know why big data is such a big deal and why everyone thinks about it differently
  • There are many ways of informing marketing decisions and there are many more to come; the psychic burden for client side researchers is greater and the competitive set for agency side researchers is broader
  • now we have to deal with companies we’ve never heard of before
  • characteristic of marketing information – new data sources, new users, unstructured data, really big data
  • what can we do with the big data we’ve had all along but never touched
  • social data is often free or very low cost
  • competitive set used to be people like nielsen, gfk, ipsos but now also ibm, hp, and facebook are in there
  • case study: new product launch
    • two approaches from traditional survey to web listening data
    • the two approaches yielded identical trend results for awareness (volume of buzz) and trial
    • sentiment analysis was not the same for two agencies
    • information from germany is more reliable than from US because germans are precise about their spelling [tells me the coding company needs to improve their misspelling algorithms]
    • this project was well priced and effective
  • case study #2: pricing and price promotion for electronics
    • what is the price elasticity for the new products that arrive every year, how does the new product affect the price elasticity of the old products
    • premium vs economy, this year vs last years model, each had a pricing policy
    • trad surveys require a prior knowledge even of competitor products, and there’s a lot of overhead with 40+ markets
    • new models did indeed affect price elasticity of old models, but didn’t know which models or by how much
    • near time data was actually better than real time data, near time data gives consumers time to assess the information and then share their opinion
  • case study #3: share metrics and imperfect information
    • wall street, banks, and upper management always want to know about share
    • data is difficult to capture, or it’s not even captured because companies don’t want to tell other people how much they’re selling
    • used POS data from willing companies, also used a household purchasing panel
    • large brands were most accurate in their share estimations but small brands were so poor they were useless
    • some data sources are redundant, can we figure out which ones provide no value
  • old world focused more on social sciences, new world focuses more on empirical outcomes
  • the value comes from integrating multiple data sources
  • as big data moves forward, we will be better able to decide what the good and bad (redundant) data sources are

https://twitter.com/DougWilliamsMHD/status/378191455652573184

Social Big Data by Juan Carlos Mejia Llano #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX

… Live blogging from the Colombian Association for Marketing and Public Opinion Research in Bogota, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • from 2010 and 2012, the amount of data generated was the same as EVER produced before then
  • the volume of data is often overwhelming – banking, telecom – they’ve always generated a lot of internal data but when you add in external data…
  • there is also a lot of variety of data, used to be very constant data – what was sold, how many, how much. But not all data is structured.
  • data comes from many places – internal data, transactional data, public data from the government and other organizations, security cameras and other sensors (eg cars driving themselves), mobile device data, social media data
  • social networks have created a massive amount of data, 30 hours of video are uploaded to youtube in one minute, 2 million searches in google per minute – info is shared real time and often is related to a specific brand
  • big data is when we have a high volume and high variety and high speed of data; big data is not new, it didn’t happen a year ago, it’s always existed. but now, social networks have pushed it forward more quickly
  • we often ignore data because there is too much of it and no way to analyze it
  • we need people who specialize in statistics to deal with this data, and you do need massive storage space
  • cognos, sql server, sap as well as spss, sas, r, statistica are all good tools to analyze business data  [yay R!]
  • now we need tools for analyzing social big data to analyze what users are saying, but this data isn’t structured at all, it cannot be done by hand
  • the digital customer is more important than the physical customer  because they have more power- internet is at their disposal to get any information and they are very informed beyond what you share with them, internet is there to complain which empowers the consumer so much that governments have actually been brought down by it or brands have reneged on new logos, internet allows people to communicate right now which can prove where you are and what you said, internet allows for a controlled interaction
  • social gives you knowledge in real time, i’ll tell you right now on twitter whether i’m happy or angry. you must act on that knowledge. it allows you to react to an issue that could affect you in the long term. you can see emotions and see their other information elsewhere.
  • online reputation is important to monitor – the brand name is more valuable than the physical buildings. you could have many buildings but no customers.
  • brands make the mistake of posting a press release on their facebook page, it changes how customers see you
  • there are paid software applications designed for social big data, there are free applications as well but they do have limitations
  • these tools help you see what people are saying about your brand, whether it’s good or bad
  • Memphis police dept decreased crime using big data – they collect criminal activities, when they happen, where they happen in order to predict where crimes will happen
  • volume, variety, and speed create big data
  • information must be processed statistically to make big data useful
  • social big data is unstructured and allows you to listen to customers

Price and the Purchase Decision by Sandra Triana #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX

… Live blogging from Bogota, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • [apologies, missed the first part of this session]
  • Pleasers: like our moms, want to please their kids. A mom might choose whatever cereal the child wants, and the child is choosing only based on the prize inside. Price is irrelevant. Takes a bit longer to make the purchase decision because they ask for opinions from the people they’re with. Price is only important in terms of knowing what the price is. Even if the price isn’t good, they will still purchase.
  • Indifferent purchases: just want the promotion, or whatever they see first. Maybe not a category they care about.
  • 38% are loyal customers, 18% are price hunters, 16% maximierzers need a reason to purchase within their decision, 15% explorers who are very important to marketers, 8% are pleasers, 5% are indifferent
  • Loyalty is category dependent but people generally fall into one type of shopper
  • Price roles 1) verify the price – loyal and pleasers 2) comparison – price hunters and maximizers
  • only 1 in 3 shoppers really use price as a comparison, price isn’t as important as we think
  • we only take 6 seconds to check the price and purchase something, the decision must be made before we go to the store
  • at home, we consider past experiences, upcoming events, what the family wants, much of the decision is made at home
  • there is no time to compare all the prices at the supermarket
  • study in 18 countries, variables studied included
    • process – the line, the displays, accessibility, distance from home
    • variety of brands available – everything they need in one store
    • price
    • service
  • do i trust the store to give me good prices, fair prices, good sales – you know whether you always trust your store to do their best
  • flyers are very important as well
  • international chains are known for good flyers and transparency in pricing – even if you don’t have time to check prices, you know the price will be fair
  • when a shopper feels secure, they no longer need to verify prices. that’s why many people just check the price instead of comparing prices
  • retailers need to create trust with their pricing models, if people don’t feel a price is fair their trust in the brand and the retailer decreases

The Fourth Dimension of Research by Gregg Archibald #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX

… Live blogging from Bogota, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • we’re still at the very beginning of the information age
  • a good plan implemented today is better than a perfect plan implemented tomorrow
  • more and more people are blending all aspects of their life, you aren’t just online or offline anymore
  • competitive set is different now, we used to know who the players were but now verizon and google and survey monkey are our competitors
  • five years ago we knew how to define a survey and a sampling frame and a crosstab, now skills need to be data scientists, influence skills, data visualization skills
  • consumers are different now, it’s harder to get to them, the 30 minute survey is harder to get
  • we still use the scientific method through all of these changes, we hypothesize, explore, design a survey, collect data, analysis, act
  • but time is compressed now, reliability and validity seem to be less important but we’re still following the process
  • healthcare has the strictest methodological standards simply because people’s lives are at stake
  • rapid testing – test a lot of hypotheses at once
  • foldit.com is an online game to work on the problem of folding proteins, hundreds of people are now working towards understanding how proteins work to help us with cancer, Alzheimers and AIDS research
  • for drugs to enter the market, they must be safe and effective, but not necessarily in every conceivable circumstance; traditionally hundreds of people will manually report when they have a problem; but now they can do the same thing in a matter of days using social types of data, they tested thousands of hypotheses in a very short time
  • data is attitudinal, behavioural, or intrinsic
  • attitudes – how many decisions do you make in an average day – 35 000 is the right answer, we give each one 2.5 seconds of thought, they don’t get rational system 3 thought
  • our free time is often when we use our mobile phone, waiting for our food, the bus, the movie to start
  • review websites are a huge source of attitudinal data [i chose my Bogota tour guide from tripadvisor. Edgar
  • was indeed as great as the reviews said]
  • behavioural data – tell me what you did, how did you use the product? But people don’t always know what or why they do things and they don’t always remember what or why. behavioural data comes from smart appliances that know when you use them, how much you use them, and when they need repairs. soon, the fridge will email you when you’re shopping to tell you you need to buy some milk
  • metrex, fitbit, and jawbone tell us everything, how much we eat, sleep, what kind of mood we’re in, these are all benefits to the consumers
  • want an internet connected fork? it knows how much is on your fork, how fast your fork goes to you mouth – hapilabs
  • “i drive the speed limit, honest” well, now we know if that’s true or not
  • this can all be linked to in-store couponing, telling employees to spend more time with a frequent visitor
  • you know that companies use your data for free… this gentleman decided to sell his data at myprivacy.info
  • intrinsic – personality and emotions – it’s not what she said, it’s what she meant
  • retinal scanning, pupil dilation, facial expression, biometric analysis – we can measure people’s faces and electrical activity and try to match them up with emotions
  • google glass is two way feedback, apps for it use facial recognition, what is your emotion AS you are looking at someone or something
  • ever thought of modelling a heat map? it can be done and you don’t need to measure 1000 people
  • we can now test many more things more quickly, exploration can be immediate, survey instrument will be needed less often, analysis is immediate

Innovation and Co-creation by Doug Williams #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX

… Live blogging from Bogoto, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • the pepsi challenge proved that people liked the taste of pepsi more than coke, so in the 80s, coke came up with “new coke” But, in 79 days of the launch, the old coke was back. People didn’t dislike old coke, but coke didn’t understand what people wanted from their soft drink.
  • people have a deep and abiding emotional attached to original coke and it caught coke by surprise, you can’t measure it anymore than you can measure love or pride — this is not true. coke simply asked the wrong questions in their research
  • stop gambling and think about co-creation as an important tool
  • innovation is a change that creates value
  • open innovation is an innovation that involves employees and consumers in the innovation process
  • co-creation is bringing consumers into the experience development process whereby both parties get something out of it
  • today, consumers live online and google glass is on its way
  • 8 of 10 internet users in Colombia are on facebook, this means people understand how sharing information online works
  • millions of colombians are fans of brands on faceboook, they want to share their opinions and that is what co-creation is all about
  • case study of airport business hub design in Bogota – used high financial value incentives for participants who could vote for the best ideas
  • some ideas included having a bike lane inside the building, signs on the ceiling, suggestions for new lighting and unusual colours, scooters in the office
  • why is co-creation necessary – risk averse companies may not want to waste resources here and rely on what worked in the past, but that doesn’t work in todays world
  • risk accepting companies harvest creative new ideas to identify unmet needs and create value
  • companies like communispace offer tools that let consumers and brands come together and chat, answer questions, provide opinions, in an online community
  • co-creation allows things to happen – you may not have expected it but there was a space to catch things you didn’t plan to catch
  • markets are being disrupted more quickly today than ever, think of companies like weight watchers that must now compete with apps, taxi services also need to compete with apps [check out lyft which is regular people offering rides to strangers]
  • “no one gets fired for buying IBM” i.e., a well-known company should be good. but this isn’t good for staying ahead of the crowd
  • you must first ask if co-creation is the right tool for your objective
  • might also be seen in things like crowdsourcing (ask everyone what colour M&M they want), ideation (the suggestion box model), private communities, contests, in-person
  • fight uncertainty with success practices – best practices are still being learned but you can be guided by past success stories
  • 1) align your community with your objectives – all consumers or young men or Italian people, talk to the RIGHT people, not necessarily a census rep sample or what the standard deviation is
  • 2) align your engagement with your community – don’t go right to facebook without first checking if your community is on facebook
  • 3) create meaningful incentives to encourage participation – match the incentive to the people, and it doesn’t need to be really high value
  • 4) iterate through co-creation – you can recontact people over time and through iterations
  • 5) cede control to your co-creators – you don’t know all the answers
  • 6) share the outcome – people need to know what happened, were my ideas valuable? tell them even if was a year down the road
  • [lots of great short case studies were presented]
  • example of co-creation: make walkers for seniors look nicer, ask for ideas from seniors and their caregivers, result was models that looked great and served new needs such as allowing them to get really closer to a counter: http://stilsicher-unterwegs.de/poolSelect.php
  • the point is not to sell, the point is to get ideas, obviously dollars count later on but not during the co-creation phase

StreetInspiration: The reality of life by Steven Van der Kruit #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction #MRX

… Live blogging from Bogoto, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • Scientific knowledge since the 1990 has increased 10 fold, and by 2030 it will be 100 times
  • the internet here is amazing compared to 5 years ago, but the roads remain full of holes
  • we are living in times of the biggest technological progress ever
  • Marketers are disconnected – spend 95% of their time in the office, much primary information is older than 6 months, most of what we think is true isn’t
  • generalizations and stereotypes make us forget about the exceptions – this wine goes with this meat… well, not all the time
  • whenever you’re given a choice, why not take both
  • a trend is the end result of fundamental change that influences our global business/life, starts in silence and by getting momentum, it travels many borders [sigh, we didn’t need to make a trend of wearing your pants half-way down]
  • It’s all about the process of change, not the trends
  • 80% of all trends originate in 12 cities in the world – biggest one is london, tokyo, and then new york
  • 3 principles: go where the fun/danger/action/pain is, go to one of the 12 towns, never go to the center of the city, don’t go to where Lonely Planet says to go, interview 2000 people but not just as a regular interview
  • pictures of artwork, crafts, toys, graffiti, advertising, vehicle decoration gives you many ideas about trends to come
  • the underworld is the upperworld now
  • traditional trend tools include intuition, foresighting, analytical, monitoring, condensing skills and “guruism”
  • the new trends tools are pattern recognition, algorithms, fast data transmission
  • “if your photographs aren’t good enough you’re not close enough” Robert Capa
  • computers analyze trends among hundreds of thousands of photographs
  • cars generate a lot of trends, as does the World Expo
  • 300 000 pictures are better than words, let the streets talk… the art, graffiti, the visible culture
  • every picture gets tagged with 6 or so words, then track the words to see which ones are increasing, decreasing and you’ve got the hint of a trend
  • you can also run a colour analysis and see if new colours are appearing over time more/less often, e.g., seafoam green suddenly popping up everywhere
  • for some people, the future is 2 weeks away or 2000 years away
  • highest order of change 4/4/4/40 rule…. 4 minutes without oxygen and you’re dead, 4 hours without protection or you’re dead, 4 days without water and you’re dead, and 40 days without food or you’re dead — everything political is related to this
  • what is energy was free? what if all water was salt-free and free,
  • measure what you do, but measure the right number. Don’t measure what your gas cost, measure how much you used. Don’t measure how much you ate, measure how many calories.
  • why waste water in fabric softeners and detergent when we are using water faster than it is being replaced. we aren’t measuring the right things
  • trends in the making – longer life, up-cycling, space travel, slower life
  • the treasure hunt model – gold, silver, timber cocoa, sugar are the path to power
  • the path to democracy used to be colonies, war, religion; now it’s empowerment
  • the future will be all about energy, water, food
  • things to do: think global, not national; understand what the world likes; focus on infrastructure; empower the poor with technology; travel

Functional Literacy and Human Economics by Ana Lucia Lima #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction #MRX

… Live blogging from Bogoto, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

  • 14 million adult Brazilians cannot read or write, 7% [sad 😦 ]
  • half of kids do not meet standards of reading and math in grade 3
  • less than 30% learn reading/writing/math to expected standards by grade 12 which means they have huge limitations in life
  • even people who stay in school do not learn as much, as well, as they could or should
  • this is not ok, you must do something to change this no matter what you do in life
  • but we are improving, today’s terrible is better than yesterday’s terrible
  • school’s must produce not just students, but capable students
  • they created a literacy index to track the learning curve, it’s not sufficient to just look at the results, we must act on the results
  • classified into four groups – can’t read at all, basic readers who may misinterpret things, people who can read and write, people who are extremely literate
  • want to know if they can live in a social context with many inputs from everywhere, newspapers, blogs, products
  • 27% are still functionally illiterate and this is an improvement from 39% ten years ago
  • only 60% of people with a university degree are functionally literate considering all of reading, writing, and math
  • the test is done at the person’s home, it’s done one on one. answers are verbal and written as needed. e.g., what is the name of this magazine or using a calendar what day of the week was September 7. Advanced people are given a paragraph to read and asked about a fact named in the paragraph.  The questions always related to your daily routine. Spelling mistakes are allowed.
  • people are asked if their parents can read, if there are books in their home, do they go to a public or private school
  • [imagine how different your marketing would be if half of your audience was functionally illiterate]
  • this can be used as a planning tool by government organizations
  • data is made available to anyone who wants it, lots of doctoral research uses it
  • anyone who wants to use the data or help promote the cause by sponsoring or volunteering in some way, please get in touch
  • adults do not want to go back to school so the help needs to come from church, friends, family, and community
  • “De Olho nas Metas 2012”  Rep sample of 27000 english tests and math tests

https://twitter.com/natbonr/status/377830848621711360

Brand Growth by Douwe Radenmaker #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction #MRX

… Live blogging from Bogoto, Colombia, any errors are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

  • There are too many brands in the store to consider them all so they preselect a few and work from there
  • Motivations are not stable, they depend on experiences with things and people, resources including money, lifestage
  • what is the impact of recession of these choices
  • 9/11 drastically changed the fundamental needs and motivations of US people and Latin Americans
  • there is no such thing as beer market or a smartphone market – there is a need for social relaxation, for connoisseurship; You buy something because you NEED to do something, this helps you step over boundaries
  • Brand resonance is achieved when people become familiar with unique brand associations and relevant to their individual journey; one aspect only is insufficient
  • even this framework is unstable, it is constantly hit by disruptions that require brands to evolve, adapt, and recreate
  • Disruption of context: e.g., mcdonalds responded to the recession by lowering the price of their combo “it won’t change your life but at least you will enjoy a good time”
  • Disruption of people:  population is aging, Nintendo needs to deal with the fact that 1 in 5 Americans will be 65 or older in 2030; they are targeting more games to older people
  • Disruption of market: Samsung quickly jumped on the smart phone trend with the galaxy, but what happened to the blackberry? brands that effectively resonate over time build loyalty with their consumers
  • we need to work faster to deal with all of these disruptions
  • how to deal with these changes? innovation, communication, strengthening the core through PPPP
  • Brand resonance alone is not enough to grow your brand [you need to put a chart if there are researchers in the crowd 🙂 ]
  • if you want to touch the heart, go through the wallet
  • Path to Purchase including retailer choice, purchasing, informing/planning, path to purchase trigger – now put a spider web among them
  • this path is not the same for every brand in the category, you need to know YOUR path to purchase which is unique to each brand
  • Purchases can be planned or unplanned – do you decide at home or in front of the shelf [everything fits in a 2 by 2 grid 🙂 ]
  • Planned finder (water, beer, detergent),
  • Unplanned decider (didn’t plan to buy it and don’t know what brand to buy) – people don’t know where to find it in the store, you need to make sure they recognize the benefits of your brand  [interesting concept, never thought of things in this way]
  • Unplanned finder
  • Planned decider
  • brand growth requires brand resonance and owning the path to purchase
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