Neuroscience Scalable Marketing Solutions by Charles Spence #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX


… Live blogging from the Colombian Association for Marketing and Public Opinion Research in Bogota, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • successful new products appeal on both rational and emotional levels to as many senses as possible
  • how do you engage a tv in more than audio visual senses?  about opening the box has an olfactory experience as well, perhaps consider a branded smell [what the!?]
  • McGurk effect – visual illusion where looking at a person talking makes your brain interpret what you hear, you think you see them saying a certain sound but you don’t
  • the music you hear in a store affects the products you purchase – french music creates french wine purchases, ditto for german music and german wine. but people refuse to believe the music had any influence on their choice.
  • what do marketers do if the consumer doesn’t know why they make their decisions?
  • changing the fragrance of a shampoo makes people think the shampoo works better
  • where is the “buy” button in the brain?
  • fMRI is popular because it is colourful, lying in a scanner while a deafeningly loud machine watches you drink a beverage is not real  [HA HA!]
  • physiological measures becoming more popular – microexpressions, skin response, heart rate, pupil dilation, eye movements – these are challenging for real world applications
  • a manly shape to a bottle implies the product is strong, eg a squarish bottle versus one that is thinner at the middle
  • for every $2 increase in the price of a bottle of wine, the weight of the bottle increases by 8 grams, price doesn’t tell you which wine is better but which wine has a heavier bottle; even stronger for a tube of lipstick
  • perhaps make your packaging feel heavier even if you’re losing less packaging
  • the sound of chips crunching defines how we think they taste, how fresh we think they are – P&G wanted to know how they should change the sound of their chips
  • pens click when you open them, touching fabric creates a sound, spraying something creates a sound, some things should feel AND sound soft
  • restaurants can include the sounds and smells and sights relevant to the product, one restaurant even provides a headset for you to listen to while you eat and people perceive this food to taste better
  • a brain seeing a red drink or a blue drink decides on the flavour, the sweetness, and this differs by culture. A blue drink might make you think raspberry, mint, or mouthwash.
  • if you put chips in the wrong package, people are either confused or taste the flavour that it says on the bag
  • is it the plate or is it the food? the size and colour of the plate changes your experience of the food.
  • test the perceptions of different food colours by using augmented reality headsets that change the appearance of the colour for you
  • eye monitoring tells you where people look at a package – at the words, the pictures, the price?
  • putting your brand name on the narrow section of a bottle of shampoo means people are more likely to see the name – people always look at the narrow section first
  • new trend sweeping the UK is synaesthetic marketing – people who unconsciously associate a color or shape with a number or letter [Olive Sacks writes about this, really neat case studies]
  • most people do associate shapes and speech sounds – round shapes are soft letters, sharp shapes are angular letters. use these round and angular letters to describe your product.
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