Tag Archives: leadership

Leading by Design: A leadership profile of Dr. Ann Cavoukian and her passion for privacy

This post originally appeared on the Sklar Wilton & Associates blog

If you’ve read anything about privacy in the last few years, you’re certain to have come across the name Dr. Ann Cavoukian. And if you don’t recall her name, surely you’ve heard of her concept of Privacy by Design. With all the data breaches we’ve encountered over the last several years and the most recent debacle with Facebook and Cambridge Analytica, the value of privacy has never been more clear.

Ann Cavoukian, Privacy, CanadaPrivacy by Design is the idea that every piece of technology, every website, every tool and process ought to consider how to incorporate concepts of privacy from day one and throughout the entire development process. Historically, many products and services have been, and continue to be, built such that privacy is an afterthought – once the product or service has been fully developed, people try to figure out how to retroactively apply privacy components. This strategy can easily lead to unnecessary collection of data, awkward programming work-arounds, and privacy policies that are far too complex for regular people to understand. By accounting for privacy from the start, through Privacy by Design, many of these problems can be prevented or simplified.

Ann’s career is impressive. She had Privacy by Design in mind before serving three terms and 17 years as the Information and Privacy Commissioner for Ontario, the largest province in Canada. Now, she is a distinguished visiting professor and Executive Director at Ryerson Universities Privacy and Big Data Institute. She is also a Senior Fellow of the Ted Rogers Leadership Centre at Ryerson University, and a Faculty Fellow of the Center for Law, Science & Innovation at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University.

Her awards are numerous and include being named one of the Top 25 Women of Influence in Canada, ‘Power 50’ by Canadian BusinessTop 100 Leaders in Identity, and was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal by the Governor General of Canada for taking her Privacy by Design concept globally.

What’s inspiring about Ann’s leadership is that she never wavered from her commitment to Privacy by Design. Twenty years ago, digital privacy wasn’t a thing. AOL Instant messenger, Yahoo Messenger, MSN messenger, and LiveJournal existed. Skype showed up in 2003, Facebook in 2004, and Reddit and YouTube in 2005. To the average person 20 years ago, privacy was boring and manifested as physically locked filing cabinets in locked rooms – impenetrable without two keys. Yet Ann had the foresight to realize that planning for digital privacy would become paramount. She’s held strong to this message for more than two decades.

Today, her Privacy by Design strategy has traversed the globe and been translated into 40 languages. In 2010, International Privacy Regulators unanimously passed a Resolution recognizing Privacy by Design as an international standard. As we progress with integrating artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning with our marketing technologies, we must take care to implement Privacy by Design. Not because regulators say we should, but because Ann has repeatedly demonstrated that it’s the right thing to do.

You can find Ann on TwitterLinkedinWikipedia, at Ryerson University’s Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence where she is the Distinguished Expert-in-Residence, or her foundation Global Privacy and Security By Design.

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This post was written in my role as a consultant for Sklar Wilton & Associates. SW&A has worked for more than 30 years with some of Canada’s most iconic brands to help them grow their brand, shape corporate culture, build successful innovation, define portfolio strategies, and maximize research ROI. They offer strategic advice, business facilitation, research management, qualitative/quantitative research, and analytics. SW&A was recognized as a Great Workplace for Women in 2018, and the Best Workplace in Canada for Small Companies in 2017 by the Great Place To Work® Institute. Inquire about their services here.

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Digital Networking for the Skeptic Leader

This post originally appeared on the Sklar Wilton & Associates blog.

There are many reasons to love the internet but my top reason is that it shrinks the world to fit into my own backyard. Whether someone lives in Australia, India, Japan, Finland, South Africa, Venezuela, Mexico, or even in another province of Canada, I can communicate with all of them on a personal, one to one basis any time and any day I want. Networking with a global community of industry experts has never been easier and, given global accessibility and the accelerated rate of technological innovations, never more essential.

One of the main problems people have with social media networks and digital networking, however, is that the tools are boring, irrelevant, or waste a lot of time. A few quick tips might help to improve the experience so that you too can benefit from digital networking.

1.      Find the social network that’s right for you

There are hundreds of social networks but you only need to find and participate in the one that suits you best. If you are visually oriented, head off to Pinterest or Instagram. If you want to get to know people personally, Facebook is the place for you. If you like a mixture of personal and business content that is short and sweet, Twitter is the place for you. If you’re all business, all the time, LinkedIn will suit you perfectly. Indeed, anyone wishing to grow their brand or further their career should be active on LinkedIn.

There are many more networks to choose from but the bulk of English industry conversations take place on these networks. You could try QQ.com or Weibo.com if you speak Chinese, or Vk.com if you speak Russian.

2.      Focus on people in your industry

Most social networks try to help new users by suggesting accounts to follow. Bad idea! Absolutely never follow their recommendations. If you are forced to do so to get your account working, be sure to unfollow those accounts as quickly as you can. Following celebrities, athletes, musicians, and pundits might be fun at first but, over time, you’ll find that type of content to be sensationalist and boring. You’ll probably even give up.

Instead, seek out people in your field, including industry experts, keeners, and hobbyists. If your industry is marketing, search for keywords like marketing, advertising, branding, retail, customers, consumers, messaging, pricing, or targeting. If your industry is market research, search for keywords like analytics, data, ethnography, focus groups, insights. Identify the relevant hashtags such as #marketing, #advertising, #branding, #MRX, or #NewMR. Find your relevant industry association. Identify the people who use those words and follow their accounts.

Even better, identify at least one expert who is well known in your industry and follow all the accounts they follow. More specifically, take care to follow personal accounts that showcase the names and photos of human beings not business accounts with names and logos of businesses.

To ensure you’ve always got a regular stream of new, interesting, and unusual ideas flowing through your stream, follow at least 1000 accounts from around the world. You aren’t supposed to read everything from these 1000 people as if they’re emails or personal messages. Rather, glance at whatever is passing through your stream when you happen to feel like taking a peek.

3.      Go beyond surfing and lurking

Social networks are supposed to be social but that doesn’t mean you have to share photos of your dinner or your kids (actually, give your kids the gift of privacy and don’t share any information about them online). You also don’t have to fill up the interweebs with random chatter just for the sake of being able to say you participated.

In the digital space, you are encouraged and expected to communicate with anyone, even world renowned, industry gurus, about anything. When you do see a post that is interesting or thought provoking, reply or leave a comment for the author. Let them know you liked their idea or share your own experience with the topic.

In addition to replying to comments, be sure to share your own ideas. Many people think they have nothing interesting to say, nothing new to say, or simply nothing worth sharing. I can 100% assure you that this is wrong. Everyone is an expert in something. Everyone has a unique perspective on even the most ordinary topics. The trick is simply to recognize when one of those opinions has popped into your head.

When you do share and comment, you’ll quickly become part of a conversation with people you’ve never talked to before but who now look forward to hearing from you. You never know who you’ll become fast friends with, who might ask you to speak at a conference, or who might turn into your best client.

4.      Communicate on a personal level

Networks like LinkedIn try to be helpful by giving users templated responses, sometimes suggesting phrases such as “I’ll be in touch” or “thank you” as one-click responses. Unless you need to reply to a hundred messages in the next five minutes, don’t take the bait. Take the time to respond to every person individually with a relevant thought or comment, even if it is simply a more personal way of saying “thanks a bunch!”

Some networks allow you to send automated messages. For instance, Twitter can be set up so that any new follower automatically receives a private message thanking them for the follow. Some people create longer private messages that include further contact information about their products and services. Don’t do that. Most automated messages are unwelcome. In fact, they might even encourage someone to stop following you. If you truly want to thank people for following your account, take the time to do it personally.

5.      Social media is for social not selling

If your title begins with a C (e.g., Chief, Consultant) or has the word “business” or “sales” in it, chances are every time you talk to someone, your brain tries to force you to offer a sales pitch or to invite someone to review your products and services. Don’t do it. Turn off that part of your brain. Beginning any new relationship with a sales pitch is a sure fire way to encourage someone to click on the mute/unfriend/unfollow/block button.

Instead, get to know people. Simply chat with people. Engage in some genuine conversation about the state of the industry. Learn what industry topics are important to them and what their challenges are. As part of a normal conversation between friends. Over time, you might experience the ultimate metric of success… you might find that you are asked for a pitch.

6.      Keep your profile current

Over time, you`ll learn more about your industry, and your interests and experiences will evolve. The profile you set up on a social media account 3 years ago may have been fun and relevant then, but it certainly doesn’t describe who you are today. Sometimes, that very short profile is all that people will see about you so make sure it reflects who you are today, not the young and uninformed kid you were 3 years ago. Current photos help new friends recognize you in the conference crowd, and current websites help potential clients learn more about your services on their own initiative. Make it a habit to update, or at least check, your information once each year.

Above all, don’t stress. If you find a social network to be overwhelming or unhelpful, find a buddy who can guide you through the intricacies and help you find a strategy that works for you.

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This post was written in my role as a consultant for Sklar Wilton & Associates. Sklar Wilton & Associates has worked for more than 30 years with some of Canada’s most iconic brands to help them solve tough business challenges to unlock growth and build stronger brands. SW&A was recognized as a Great Workplace for Women in 2018, and the Best Workplace in Canada for Small Companies in 2017 by the Great Place To Work® Institute. Recognized as the number one Employee Recommended Workplace among small private employers by the Globe and Mail and Morneau Shepell in 2017, SW&A achieved ERW certification again in 2018.

 

 

Defying Stereotypes: A profanity-filled leadership profile of Cindy Gallop

If reading about profanity and sex aren’t your thing, you can read a tame version of this post on the Sklar Wilton & Associates blog.

Meet Cindy Gallop.

Cindy Gallop - I like to blow shit up.

Cindy likes to blow shit up.

Cindy Gallop is glaringly bold and contentious in sharing her opinions about the state of advertising, the lack of gender equality in the advertising industry, and misperceptions of what comprises normal, healthy sexual relationships among people.

She began her career in advertising and made a name for herself at the Bartle Bogle Hegarty agency. She later founded their US branch, eventually being recognized as the Advertising Woman of the Year by the Advertising Women of New York in 2003.

Now, Cindy is the founder of MakeLoveNotPorn, an extremely ‘Not Safe For Work’ (NSFW) social sex website that aims to derail misperceptions about healthy sexual relationships. She is also the founder of IfWeRanTheWorld, a real-world experiment in tapping good intentions and turning them into tangible, do-able microactions that anyone and everyone can help you to do.

Just like Cindy, millions of people have worked hard, risen through the ranks, and founded companies. No big deal. Okay, it IS a big deal but that’s not the point here. The point, rather, is that when I think about people who are leaders, not simply presidents or founders or CEOs, I immediately think of Ms. Gallop. She reminds me on a near daily basis of four qualities I admire in genuine leaders.

1)     Be bold and fierce. Cindy isn’t meek, mild, and moderately opinionated. We’ve blogged before about the appropriateness of using profanity in the workplace, and Cindy has zero qualms about it. Her unabashed use of profanity and colloquial language to make her points clear and strong captures people’s attention and brings them into the conversation regardless of whether they agree with her.

I want to be very clear on this: Yes, MakeLoveNotPorn.com and All The Sky have enormous social benefit, but I am also out to make an absolute goddamn fucking shit ton of money. – MMLaFleur

I deplore the shying away that can go on, within women, from the term ‘feminist.’ I am, absolutely, all about being a feminist. – Ted.com

Cindy personified bold when Kevin Roberts, a top ranking advertising executive at advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi, resigned after a gender diversity controversy, She had no qualms issuing a public statement with a valiant dare, a statement that on its own caused even more controversy.

“I see that Kevin Roberts was paid a total salary of $4,137,786 last year, whereas, contrary to his remarks directed at me, nobody anywhere is paying me anything to do the work I do in this area. I note that PublicisGroupe/Saatchi and Saatchi Worldwide now have a vacancy for a leadership coach, and I’d like to offer my services. Obviously, to ensure there is no gender wage gap, at the same salary Kevin Roberts was being paid.”

In her efforts to promote diversity and equality, she’s regularly accused of promoting ‘quota’ and ‘diversity’ hires that will lead to people who aren’t sufficiently qualified to be hired. Her response to those claims continue to be bold and fierce.

“Look around at the mediocre men who were hired just because they were men. Get hired because you are a woman or person of color and then do a bloody brilliant job in that role.” – AdAge

“Diversity raises the fucking bar.” – 3% Conference

2)     Defy stereotypes. Everyone is raised with stereotypes. Boys and girls are taught how men and women ought to look, speak, dress, and present themselves. Boys and girls are taught how ‘young’ and ‘old’ people are supposed to behave. Our culture has taught us that older women should be quiet, demure, and blend into the background, but Cindy has completely rejected those notions. Instead, she focuses on what is right for her.

Cindy Gallop

Cindy believes you shouldn’t hide your age. At 57, you could say she’s an older woman. And even though she’s not part of the Hollywood scene, she dresses however she pleases including wearing leopard-skin miniskirts, biker pants, python skin pants, leather pantsuits, and warrior outfits because what she chooses to wear is no one’s business but her own. Who’s to say that older women must show restraint and modesty in their clothing choices? Restraint is not Cindy’s modus operandi.

I consider myself a proudly visible member of the most invisible segment of our society: older women. I would like to help redefine what society thinks an older woman should look like, be like, work like, dress like and date like by the way I live my life. – The Guardian

3)     Ignore what haters and nay-sayers think. Cindy knows what is meaningful and important, and if someone isn’t comfortable with her use of profanity, her social sex projects, or how she presents herself as an older woman, well, they’d better get used to feeling uncomfortable. Cindy keeps on fighting for the causes she believes in, and she keeps on trying to mend misperceptions of sexuality so that people can have more realistic expectations of what a healthy sex life really is.

4)     Do what is right. Cindy has a firm handle on what it means to do the ‘right’ thing and she’s oriented her life to achieve that goal. Not in keeping with stereotypes of women, and particularly of older women, her end goal is to become rich. But at the same time, she also wants to create and support endeavors that have enormous social benefit. She’s managed to do this with both of her projects – MakeLoveNotPorn and IfWeRanTheWorld.

“When we launched If WeRanTheWorld, I said to my team, I want us to innovate in every aspect of how we design and operate this as a business venture, as much as the web platform itself – because I want us to design our own startup around the working lives that we would all like to live. Women and men alike.”Forbes

I say to women: you have to set out to make an absolute goddamn fucking shit-tonne of money. When you negotiate your salary, ask for the most money you possibly can without bursting out laughing – for yourself and for every other woman. – The Guardian

Cindy’s leadership style and her dedication to her projects has amassed her more than 60 000 devoted followers on Twitter. Her provocative Ted Talk (Make love, not porn) has garnered millions of views. If you’re not yet convinced that Cindy’s leadership style is one to be admired, or at least appreciated, watch her talk at Mumbrella360 on How Advertising Can Change the World. You might learn a few things.

Perhaps you’d like these posts too…

This post was written in my role as a consultant for Sklar Wilton & Associates. SW&A has worked for more than 30 years with some of Canada’s most iconic brands to help them grow their brand, shape corporate culture, build successful innovation, define portfolio strategies, and maximize research ROI. They offer strategic advice, business facilitation, research management, qualitative/quantitative research, and analytics. SW&A was recognized as a Great Workplace for Women in 2018, and the Best Workplace in Canada for Small Companies in 2017 by the Great Place To Work® Institute. Inquire about their services here.

Voxpopme 10: What can companies or managers do to support the advancement of women in the workplace? @WomenInResearch #MRX #NewMR

EP10: What do you believe is the ONE most important step companies or managers can take to support the advancement of women in the workplace?

I’m delighted to contribute to this episode of VoxPopMe along with WIRe, Women In Research. The team at WIRe contributes so many good things to our industry in order to help bring more women forward as the experts that we are. Do take the time to check them out and see how they can help you, or how you can help them.

It’s hard to identify one most important step because there are so many small and big things people and companies can do. I’ll frame it like this. Companies can take a good, hard, honest look at the efforts they’ve made thus far and course correct.

  • What percentage of your senior leadership team is women? Does your senior team suffer from token womanism? It’s frustrating to research a potential client or employer only to find the senior team is ten men and one women. (Let’s not even go so far as to consider diversity of ethnicity, disability, etc) If your company truly values diversity, it’s literally impossible for the demographics of the senior team to not demonstrate it. And don’t course correct by adding a VP of Diversity. Course correct by hiring an expert in your industry/business, e.g., VP of Data/IT/Research/CustomerExperience.
  • What percentage of promotions with senior leadership potential have been offered to women? We know that women are less likely to ask for promotions and raises so pay attention to whether you’re offering these opportunities to people who are asking (overtly or covertly) versus people who have quietly contributed to the bottom line without beating their chest and proclaiming how great they are.
  • What percentage of speakers sent by your company to conferences last year were women, and did you send the same woman every time? You might notice that the same speakers appear at conferences over and over again. Well, maybe it’s time to divide up the 25 speaking slots among 10 people, even better among five women and five men who’ve never taken the stage before. In my work with new speakers, I’ve yet to see a single new speaker fail miserably on stage. In fact, the fast majority are AS GOOD AS other speakers. I kid you not. Sure, some show their nerves but the audience cares more about the content than the nerves. I guarantee you’ve got at least one diamond in the rough, probably several. Take the risk, earn the reward.
  • Are you an encourager, nudger, promoter, motivator, and ally? Do you regularly (kindly and respectfully) push and prod to help the quiet people show their expertise? Sometimes, asking someone to submit a conference proposal will turn into a yes on the fifth or tenth ask. Keep on asking. Keep on making sure they know they DO have expertise and they CAN succeed as a speaker/leader/manager, or whatever the seemingly scary task is.

Happy Women’s Day! May you share in the joy of equality and respect for everyone.

Photo target audience: Must love research, must be female, must have the same colour hair

What is Voxpopme Perspectives? Along with a group of market researchers from around the world, I was asked to participate in Voxpopme Perspectives – an initiative wherein insights industry experts share ideas about a variety of topics via video. You can read more about it here or watch the videos here. Viewers can then reach out over Twitter or upload their own video response. I’m more of a writer so you’ll catch me blogging rather than vlogging. 🙂

My wish for 2017

Last year I wrote two completely different books. The first, called People Aren’t Robots, is a practical guide to questionnaire design. The second book details strategies and tactics for becoming a thought leader. As I said, two completely unrelated books. But as I pondered about those books in general terms, I realized they actually have a lot in common. Both books devote much content towards treating others as real people – flawed, subjective, emotional human beings. 

In the world of questionnaire design, this means realizing that people want to help by answering questions even when researchers think they don’t ‘qualify.’ That people want to help researchers by finding the best answer even when no answers are correct. That people want to finish questionnaires even when those questionnaires are painfully long, confusing, and boring. It means that researchers need to rethink how they write questionnaires so that the human on the other side is treated with respect rather than as a source of data. 

In the world of thought leadership, it means letting employees talk to clients in their own voice, without formal language, and without trademarked terms. It means letting employees share their personalities and interests when they chat with customers online so that they become genuine friends. It means that employers need to trust their employees to relate to others in the online world as people, not logos. 

My wish for 2017 is simple. I wish that people would stop engaging with other people. Stop communicating, stop connecting, stop broadcasting. Instead, let’s chat. Let’s noodle over ideas. Let’s ponder and debate and talk. Let’s prattle on and yak and gab. Let’s drop the formalities of standard social media connections and business conversations and start behaving like genuine human beings with faces and names. People who share silly jokes and terrific research design tips, funny cartoons and cool SQL code bits. 

Not only is it more natural, it’s good for business. Think about some of the customer service experiences that have gone viral. This Netflix agent who pretended to be a Star Trek captain (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/31/netflix-customer-service_n_4178662.html) or this Amazon agent pretending to be Thor ( https://www.joe.ie/movies-tv/great-odins-raven-amazon-customer-service-agent-pretends-hes-thor-and-its-fantastic/459458). 

Of course, this isn’t a call for everyone to start pretending to be superheroes and cartoon characters. It is, however, a call to let the inner geek and nerd out of the box. Let the inner human out. 

Annie Pettit, PhD, FMRIA is a research methodologist who specializes in survey design and analysis, data quality, and innovative methods. She is the author of People Aren’t Robots: A practical guide to the technique and psychology of questionnaire design  as well as 7 Strategies and 10 Tactics to Become a Thought Leader, available on Amazon

Putting email to work for you, #IIeX, #IMD16 

Live notetakeing at the #IMD16 conference in chicago. Any errors are my own.

No more eblasts: reimagining email for the modern subscriber by Monica Montesa, Aweber

  • Email is not dead, it’s evolved into bigger and better
  • Email shouldn’t be measured by how many subscribers you have
  • Email is not just about making a sale
  • IT’s time to embrace the human on the other end of the email
  • Personalized email get a higher click though, 40% higher
  • Not allowed to use the word eblast, feels one way and self serving, makes content seem like it’s for no one in particular
  • Email is for more than just company news
  • People prefer email communications over social media, but you must deliver value
  • Broadcast email is a one time notice, maybe time sensitive, maybe promotions or discounts, share blog content, maybe include some user generated content like client stories
  • Emails don’t have to be a sales pitch every time, newsletter can remind that you are a thought leader
  • Consider auto-responders, welcome series that triggers for people who just signed up, include evergreen content with no time deadlines, include introduction to you and company, an ebook, contact information, an educational course
  • A course doesn’t need to be a huge thing, maybe five emails positioned together
  • Aim for quality not quantity for an email list
  • List building tactics – set proper expectations, make sure signup form describes the content they will receive, engaging call to action, avoid boring words, offer an incentive to signup like an ebook or checklist or a free consultation
  • Meet your audience where they are, promote your list on your social channels so you can control who sees it, consider ads to drive traffic to the signups
  • Ebooks give a lot of value, Balance value with promotion
  • Consideration – introduce your product as a solution
  • Conversion – convince audience to sign up, don’t be shy about the sale, share testimonials, discounts and consultations work here

Putting your email marketing to work: generating and prequalifying leads at scale, by Ana Jacobsen, Drip from Leadpages

  • Are you happy with your op-in rate?
  • List growth is critical to business growth
  • Is the opt-in on your website hidden? Do people have to hunt for it?
  • Do you ONLY collect emails for your newsletter? 
  • It needs be on the homepage along with something valuable
  • Welcome mat is very important, tell people why to opt-in, spotify uses it to generate users growth, uber takes over the first page for it
  • SumoMe is free and recommended
  • Pop-up or widget is also effective, can be irritating but done well can engage folks. Pinterest does this. L’Oreal does it also but they don’t say sign up for our list, they say sign up for free samples
  • Landing page must stand alone and convince them to convert, no nav bars, no footer, no chat box, just design to get conversion – CARFAX, Oprah website – if there is only one button on the page it will get clicked
  • Least obtrusive is the top bar on the website – HelloBar is free, works well on WordPress
  • But an invite on blog posts, you know they have prequalified themselves as most interested, maybe even match the blog message to the invite message – DrIpForm 
  • How many white papers are on your hard drive, Ryan Dice is a great marketer, recommend following him, but how any of these white papers have you actually read, are people actually engaging with them?
  • The case for campaigns – follow up every white paper download and see if people liked it, wanted to commend on it, or questions, follow up for a 4 week time period
  • Subscribers should not get generic followups, interested visitors will fill out lots of data, can push people towards the right email followup
  • Emails can link to your calendar where they can choose a time to speak with you, reminders stop for them but not for other people

Contented: Learn to love the art of creating relevant stuff by Susan Griffin, Brainjuicer

  • Need to consider what you want to say and what clients want to hear
  • Creating and sharing an asset that is helpful and informative, content has to tell your story, what makes your company te best resource
  • Snail mail now email, travel books are now travel websites
  • Need to apply your principles to your clients and yourselves 
  • Fluency – distinct assets used to recognize a brand act as a toolkit to build market share
  • Fame – how readily a brand coe to mind predicts market share
  • Have many touch pains – website, case studies, white papers, get individual items that work together
  • Mark Earls, Herdmeister, a thought leader around social, we dont do anything by ourselves, light little fires and one of them start a big fire
  • You can say you do conjoint and segmentation but you’re basically telling clients you sell wrenches and screwdrivers, you need to say you understand their needs, those tools aren’t distinctive
  • Don’t be narcissistic brand, use product names that people recognize
  • Marketoonist is great at this, cartoons are $35 and they are powerful story tellers
  • If you’re going to do social media, do it seriously, don’t be the person with 8 followers and 3 tweets
  • Figure out how to blog regularly even if it’s just a tiny share
  • Relevant content comes in different sizes – a tweet, a white paper
  • Recycling is good, you can share old articles again, repurpose the content
  • Don’t scare up personalization, get the name right or don’t use the name at all, make sure first and last names aren’t flipped
  • Content needs to grab people, don’t be bait and switch, be bait and catch
  • A How-To gives readers a quick thing to read of just 5 actionable points that is relevant to a problem

How to succeed in market research without really trying #MRX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Panel Discussion with Emerging Leaders in the Marketing Research Industry in Canada #MRIA14 #MRX

Live blogging from the #MRIA national conference in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.saskatoon

Panel Discussion with Emerging Leaders in the Marketing Research Industry in Canada

Moderator: Mark Wood, Vice President, TNS

Panelists: Raj Manocha, Vice President, AskingCanadians, Jara Ulbrych, Corporate Insights at The Coca-Cola Company, Scott Switzer, VP, Business Development, Vision Critical, Megan Harris, Consumer Insights at SABMiller Canada

  • Raj: Scalability depends on the job, how do you not comprise on service when you go with vastly smaller sample sizes. need to hire people who can do multiple things
  • Megan: discovered MR during her MBA, disappointed she didn’t learn of it earlier. Research is an investment, not a short term payback. People want to put money against fastest return on investment.
  • Embedded image permalinkScott: Got into MR playing poker at Angus Reid’s house.  We don’t profess solutions will do everything for everyone. Provide means and flexibility for clients.
  • Jara: Had a friend working at Ipsos who told him of a job opening.  Decision to increase investment in brand led to increase in research, much is tracking and global obligation.  Tough to find money for ad hoc projects. Looking for productivity saves – global contracts, extra services.
  • Scott: There is a lot of stress regarding what to do with limited resources, people don’t want to feel like a vendor coordinator, need to empower the internal research person with external services
  • Megan: Exposure to other areas of the business is a good thing, MR feeds into other areas of the business, can see what other areas need.
  • Jara: multiple hats means other areas of the business not other areas of the business
  • Raj: every conference says technology is changing, we need to educate people, talk to people in the way they want to be talked to. Test a new method just to see what the data looks like and how it matches the other data you have.
  • Jara: new technology needs to be for something that isn’t possible in an existing method, open to new things but it must be proven and provide new information
  • Megan: People fall back on methods that they’re comfortable with, don’t know what the payoff will be; Need to build better story telling skills
  • Scott: supplier side must become better storytellers to move things up the chain, especially when there is consensus buying. Story is a mindset shift.  Many high levels executives still see research as a nice to half. Average age of VC employee is 33 years old.
  • Embedded image permalinkMegan: She is the only dedicated researcher in Canada. Globally there are many resources and she can tap into that resource.
  • Raj: Everyone mentors everyone else. He counts on younger folks to tell him to to do, tell him how they need help. 360 degrees is how to become a strong company.
  • Jara: no formal mentorship program, but experiences they get happen outside the research team. some work in different workstreams to solve real issues. gets you out of the research world and explore parts of the company that you migh tnot have otherwise.
  • Scott: conferences often feel the same, the piece of learning together is lacking, it’s just listening to people talking [introverts love this! if conferences were groups and talking, i would never go]
  • Megan: want more content about advancement of knowledge by function, pressure to make a good impression so conferences need to be friendly
  • Jara: want more young people involved in the MRIA and research in general, most people fell into MR, we should present at career fairs and present at career days [yup, i fell into it after building/validation police officer selection tests]
  • Raj: Emerging Leaders Taskforce is to get more involvement, need more people to be a part of the team, better networking so that young people can get involved and learn
  • [Thanks Jara for skyping in!]

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Chat with Leaders of Technology and Innovation in Market Research #CASRO #MRX

Live blogging from the #CASRO tech conference in Chicago. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Fireside Chat with Leaders of Technology & Innovation in Market Research

Moderated by Kristin Luck, Decipher


Pat Graham

Niels Schillewaert

Ben Smithee

Mary Sobiechowski

Kristin Luck
  • [comments below come from individual speakers but I’ve not specified who said what]
  • possible to be innovative in emerging countries but not necessarily in first world countries
  • it’s easier for larger companies to roll out innovation
  • does size matter? does being smaller help?
  • innovation is a moving target. everyone thinks their company is innovative.
  • everyone is probably doing innovative things, everyone is doing things to push a client’s business forward, it doesn’t have to be a new product, it can be a new thought
  • Embedded image permalinkwe don’t push ourselves far enough, we’re more test and see than simply push the boundaries
  • you won’t be fired for hiring a big company but you could be for hiring a small company
  • smaller agencies don’t have to justify themselves to anyone, anything, or speed. they can just do it without legacy
  • there’s no danger in not doing something new, more likely to get fired for trying something new that doesn’t work
  • do we need to be more accepting of trying new things and failing
  • most clients don’t really want to try something new, they need to be pushed into a non question/answer format
  • we should be led by “What will consumers trust us to do? will consumers think we are innovative and doing something cool?  Our clients are really consumers, regular people
  • we need for people to WANT to participate in research
  • why isn’t research a positive touch point for the consumer
  • research should be serious, challenging, and playful
  • Guy at Lowes replaced his tracker with google surveys and saved 80% of his budget for experimentation. he risked and won.
  • success is going from failure to failure without giving up – Churchhill
  • next generation of researchers is agile and ready to risk and fail – unlike YOU
  • View from Ben on the stage

    if you are not being extremely experimental right now, you’re in big trouble; if your school is building a library, you are in big trouble

  • must use tech to help the clients we claim to love
  • let people SHOW you what they do and need in a multimedia way, you will get a different answer from your ask and answer method
  • instagram is free qual research – images of your brand, what’s around your brand, where and when your brand is used
  • full service should innovate methods and collaborate with tech companies, they don’t need to build in house because they won’t do both well
  • MR is about understand people, behaviour, relationships; technology is a feature not a benefit
  • MR creates relationships and helps brands do something with that
  • research is becoming a smaller part of the P&M, this is our own fault, we are our own worst enemy, research should be at the center of the organization, it should be the backbone of what does and doesn’t get done, we need to give clients the data they need so that we are absolutely essential
  • if a big company implements a new technology and it is old in two years, it’s too prohibitive for them to turn back and try something new again
  • Me taking pics of the fireside chat

    data should not be 100% or you lose your credibility

  • do positive disruption – ask client four questions and see if they really did know the answers to them. need to show clients what they don’t know
  • [is it really disruptive technology? or rather, why aren’t you keeping up with the times?]
  • give young people the space to develop, it’s not necessarily age but surround yourself with Gen Y, give them the space to learn and build things, so that you can learn from them – reverse mentoring
  • hire based on culture – can you have fun with them, is there innate passionate curiosity
  • GFK or Kantar won’t put a small company out of business, it will be another small company that takes their space
  • many people are still happy to keep doing what they’ve always been doing, it’s easier, predictable. you can’t just get rid of anyone over thirty. you need to educate them and show them the world is a different place. the world is more than excel and powerpoint.
  •  advice to move business ahead:
  • don’t think about mobile as a channel or physical object, it is a physical location, it’s about the person and getting not just the person but the interaction, know how to use devices called mobile, know how to use the sensors on the devices to be closer to the brand experience
  • bring more consumer context, richness into surveys, make surveys linear and nonmodular, let the crowd interpret things, upload pictures, make survey asynchronous; we use numbers and text but where are all the visuals, use them to stimulate people to think differently, make people think differently by using pictures – both for presenting results and in the research process
  • do something that your gut and your heart tells you is right but your mind is completely scared of
  • make people happy at their jobs, super-engaged by giving them new things to do, educate everyone, let them learn new apps, collaborate, share information
  • we need to automate the data manipulation and spend our time on the data insights and then here’s what to DO with the insights – big companies should be better at this than anyone

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Lift while you climb

At the recent AAPOR conference in Chicago, I attended a session on women leaders in the association. I hate to be conscious of it but I frequently find myself noticing just how few women are conference speakers in comparison to men.

I was hoping to hear insights from these women on how they managed to be strong and opinionated without being perceived as bitches and bossy-pants. That in particular is a gender bias I don’t understand but they didn’t really answer that question.

More importantly, this session made me think that that isn’t the issue. The issue really is lifting. Man or woman, sighted or blind, old or young, walking or wheeling, are you personally lifting as you climb?

I thought back to myself. I don’t see myself as a climber but rather someone who surprisingly lands in places that make me happy. But outsiders might see it as climbing. So as i’ve climbed, have I lifted?

I have co-authored papers with junior staff. (Some of whom have recoiled and refused but I think trying counts.) I have poked and prodded into the personal lives of others to figure out how I can push them closer to where they want to go. (Some have let me and I helped push them out of my company and into grad school.)

But I haven’t lifted enough. Beware colleagues and friends…

Written on the go

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