Tag Archives: QRCA

Five steps towards consumer centric thinking – consumer collaboration and beyond by Tom deRuyck #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Five steps towards consumer centric thinking – consumer collaboration and beyond 
Tom deRuyck, Head of Consumer Consulting Boards, Insites Consulting
  • you need to talk with consumers every single day and you can do that through consumer consulting boards, 150 people every day
  • you don’t have to do everything consumer’s ask
  • you must have a strategy
  • you cannot fake it, it needs to be transparent
  • it’s not enough to learn things quickly, it’s the speed of execution that counts
  • you need to make consumers an integral part of everything you do
  • how do you create consumer centric company?
  • you need a chief consumer officer, the person in the company who knows most about the customers of the company needs to be there when decisions are being made
  • Consumer collaboration initiative – don’t tackle everything at once, start small but think big, start with one brand or one team and add more later, need to be reactive and proactive, bring down the silos of
  • Create a wall of fame with all the community accomplishments like new products they’ve created, the advertising campaigns they improved
  • Activate internal stakeholders to take relevant actions – forget online, offline, report multiple times with old ways and new ways and even in person when that’s right, inspire them, share your presentations, tell the insights but let them feel the insights through an experience, turn insights into actions
  • Inspire and empower employees at all levels – executives, management, frontline, staff, activate the movers and shakers, motivate not the sales person but the consumer directly
  • Leverage results and culture externally – talk about this in your marketing and make it tangible, tell them the product was co-created, surf the wave of enthusiasm – have community members who helped co-create tell the story
  • Research the impact – measure culture performance and communication, you need a chief consumer officer – consumer coach, people engagers, ecosystem builder, action heros

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The zero moment of memory: How technology is helping – and hampering our memory by Diana Lucaci, Nick Drew #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

The zero moment of memory: How technology is helping – and hampering our memory 
Diana Lucaci, Founder, True Impact
Nick Drew, Head of Research, Yahoo! Canada
  • Marketing is about memory, that they recall your brand when they see it on the shelf
  • Forgetting is one of our most fundamental fears, not just forgetting birthdays but also face, names, habits, likes – we are a product of our memories
  • Memory isn’t perfect, there are false memories of things that haven’t happened, absentmindedness of ‘why did i go into the kitchen’, and we just forget things that we used to remember quite well
  • people can forget 3/4 of pictures shown to them over 20 minutes
  • 77% say having a to do list makes them feel less stressed
  • we use calendars to remember dates and times
  • we are moving from a time where most of the details in our lives were forgotten to a time where most of them will be captured “Smarter than you think” book
  • Dropbox means you always have all of your data with you all the time, so why bother remembering it
  • Is recording every detail of our lives the same as remembering every detail of our lives
  • How many phone numbers do you remember, do you remember all your meetings, what if you lost your phone?
  • did a deprivation exercise – people left their smartphones at home for a day, we have an addictive relationship with our smartphones, feel released and relaxed when you have your phone back
  • 80% of people say they regularly use their phone in the bathroom [um, no thanks, i’ll borrow someone else’s phone]
  • heavier smartphone users forget more, on the test they forgot twice as much as the non-users
  • Used EEG to measure electrical activity on the surface of the brain – do people like what they’re looking at, are they concentrating [i always think 50 years from now, people will laugh hysterically at our ‘innovative’ research methods  🙂 ]
  • People told to try and remember as many things as possible from a video and others told to take photos of a video
  • Emotional engagement increased a lot when they used a gadget like a phone to record it, but people who were simply watching were able to concentrate more
  • if something doesn’t enter your attention it cannot enter your memory
  • Taking photos means your memories are not as easy to retrieve and they’re not as vivid
  • we decided whether to remember things ourselves or delegate that memory to a phone calendar
  • How many phone numbers did you remember 10 years ago versus now? we are more efficient with retaining phone numbers now and we don’t even try to remember them
  • Process of recording memories is now less engaging – we can record through photos but it doesn’t capture the sound, the vibe, the scent and those have an impact
  • future of memory is in wearables like google glass, the cloud, devices will become more proactive, more apps and data organization, more photo tagging and autorecalling

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Understanding the differences in consumer attitudes between the United States and Canada…and Quebec #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Understanding the differences in consumer attitudes between the United States and Canada…and Quebec 
Moderator:Diana Lucaci, Founder, True Impact
Panelists:Catherine Yuile, Senior Vice President, Ipsos, Neil Rennert, Director Qualitative Services Canada, GfK, Jeff Doucette, General Manager Canada, Fieldagent
  • Canadians are more skeptical than Americans and Quebecers are more skeptical than the average Canadian
  • Frame of reference from three areas differs – designs on packages have imagery, what worked in US for one product didn’t work in Quebec because frame of reference was different, the symbols represented death and funerals
  • Our industry is Toronto centric, it’s hard and expensive to fragment research beyond english/quebec even though there are very big differences among our big cities, need to go to the middle to develop a market that is profitable
  • How many markets are there? It’s easy to say quebec is one market but that’s not really how it works, quebec is changing, it’s more of a melting pot, more immigration, 10% of home language in question isn’t french or english
  • Quebec is a multi-market territory, quebecers distrust outsiders, need to understand implications
  • It’s not only will the brand work in another area but will the same research method work in another area
  • will elements of an ad be relevant across the boarder
  • successful big ideas transcend time and culture, speak to basic human emotions, e.g., Nike’s “just do it”
  • influence can be european as well, if creative is developed in Paris, it may not work her, how do you please 100 countries with one creative
  • Many large retailers have moved into Canada, eg Target hasn’t delivered the experience that Canadians expect, Canadians didn’t want the US Walmart to come, some were careful to use Canadian music in their ads
  • Just because we don’t like a retailer doesn’t mean we won’t shop there
  • Many Canadian companies have tried to make a go in the US but it didn’t work. TD bank has been successful but many americans don’t realize it’s a canadian bank
  • In some cases, we WANT the US experience in canada. we don’t want another place to buy tide. we want to be able to buy that thing we can buy only on our holidays.
  • Canadians grew up with Target as a destination that they could only go to rarely and so they spent a lot of time there when they were there
  • Do the people doing the market research understand the local markets? you can’t just take the “canadian data” back to your country and understand it properly
  • I know the US from my vacation in one city, i don’t know all the culture and politics and local markets
  • Much of Canada has a subtle distrust of Toronto
  • There are regional gaps important ones being Quebec and the west, need more emphasis on local relevance of brands
  • Sometimes budget dictates you have only money for Toronto and if you’re lucky, Montreal
  • We know we aren’t going to change the product launch in a big way but we can make it more relevant to various communities
  • Race and religion are a bigger issue in US, more culture
  • Canadians can be more open-minded, like to see different pics of families in advertising but this doesn’t work everywhere in the US,  US has stronger beliefs that women do the laundry (think of that in terms of making a commercial about laundry detergent)
  • More than half of US ads do not work in Canada
  • Manhattan is very different than Kansas just as Canada is different from the US, how/when do you change the ad
  • How do I define myself as Canadian? “I’m not american”  That’s not very clear
  • American women want to look as young as possible, Canadian women want to look good at the age they are so there is less radical surgery in Canada – now design US/Canadian ads around that, which celebrities do you choose to reflect that
  • Maybe advertising can stay the same but the model/celebrity changes by region and country

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The power of cognitive interviewing and what qualitative research can learn from Behavioral Economics by Gina Henderson #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

The power of cognitive interviewing and what qualitative research can learn from Behavioral Economics 
Gina Henderson, Director, Qualitative Research, TNS
  • People don’t always do what they way they are going to do
  • motivations and needs are only half the picture, we need to understand behaviour more holistically
  • BE has made popular th eideas  that people do not believe rationally, intuition and emotion play a significant role in our behaviors, choices are affected by context
  • our choices are endless, consumers don’t give the effort to consider every possible choice, they consider what is available as opposed to what they really want
  • how do qual and BE relate? people don’t say what they mean or mean what they say, behaviour is driven by unconscious, words are poor tools, intuition and emotion are important – that why we use projective techniques
  • this is still only part of the story
  • BE says behaviour is automatic and unthinking, satisfying vs maximizing, real choices of what people actually do, contemporary, adaptive unconscious, capable of learning complex information better and faster, use behaviour as an entry point
  • Qual says choices are outcome of enduring needs preferences and beliefs, ideal solutions, feelings, perceptions, attitudes, psychoanalytical view, raw, untamed, use meaning as an entry point
  • Consumers are ok with good enough because they don’t have time to make the extra effort for the ideal solution
  • diaries and ethnographies help us learn about current behaviours
  • Cognitive interviewing – from 1970’s, police used it a lot to get as close to the actual experience as possible, this is what qual researchers want also
  • Some people believe memory failure is a failure of retrieval, we just have to know the right codes to find it, triggers could be a memory, image, smell, taste, sound, emotion, location – like smelling cookies and remembering gramma
  • Don’t ask why – consumers will give you an answer but they can’t recall in a meaningful way, it’s not conscious
  • experiment – students rated jams the exact same way as jam experts ranked them, until the students were asked WHY, then the ratings were all different
  • Goal of cognitive interviewing is to recreate the context – anchor them in time, find out what else was going on at that time, what time of the year was it, ask them about the building, the atmosphere, then ask who was there, who did you talk to, what did you talk about. Can let responder meander, they don’t need to stay on topic, don’t interrupt them, allow a freeflowing conversation, a lot of silence is okay
  • Horlicks case study – a milk additive – why did people stop using the product – learned about user habits, the environments they were in, context of using product, where the product was available, learned about whether the product could be soy or dairy
  • BE is not the answer to everything, it’s another tool

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Defining the future of market research – moving from reporting to consulting by John McGarr, Kathie Miller, Kristian Gravelle #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Defining the future of market research – moving from reporting to consulting
John McGarr, President, Fresh Squeezed Ideas
Kathie Miller, Director, Market Research and Decision Science, Takeda Pharmaceuticals
Kristian Gravelle, Director Consumer Insights Strategy, Grocery & Beverages, Kraft Foods
  • Cars often all look the same, can’t anyone do a focus group?
  • We need to move from reporting to consulting but how do we do this
  • We wear suits and ties because it is cultural, not because we want to
  • Every photograph is an artifact of people’s movements in life
  • Every decision your consumer makes is an act of culture – our culture says google and wikipedia but not everyone else’s does
  • Our brand models are often from the 1960’s – internet, mobile phone, single mothers are no longer shameful, gender identity is now fluid, anything can go viral, the american dream is dead, our world is not the same world now so how can we use the same model today
  • qual is important because there is no silver bullet method
  • there is no survey long enough to make a dent in infinity, there is no silver bullet method that answers all questions
  • tools include narrative, hypnosis, semiotics, social listening, and so much more
  • client side researcher’s role is to translate business needs to suppliers so they can better understand how to answer the business question, they are not the intermediary between the purchasing department and the external research department
  • every coffee brand manager uses the same coffee bean from a tree picked in the same way, roasted in the same way, ground in the same way
  • your presentation is not about the deck but the insights, marketers want to know the WOW WHAT AM I GOING TO DO and we need to think like that, they want to be number one in the market place
  • partnership is becoming an overused word [Totally agree]
  • it’s not about getting better pricing when we hit tiers of number of projects and sales – partnerships are two way relationship, people who want to take the ride with you
  • choose partners based on past experience and broader experience and experience with legislation in the category
  • partnerships are earned over time and will force your organization to shift and do things differently
  • future of mr is collaboration, synthesis, storytelling, activation, trust, commitment, passion – there is no methodology here
  • there is no monopoly in good ideas, they will work with different companies

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The Lysol Bathroom Workout by Terri Bressi and David Najgoldberg #GreatTalk #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Qual isn’t dead – it’s just been in the wrong place at the wrong time 
Terri Bressi, VP & Head of Qualitative, Research&Incite
David Najgoldberg, Marketing Director, Reckitt Benckiser Canada
  • Qual has been confined to a sterile “bored” room, Clients are left in the dark in a dark room, it’s aquarium style viewing, passive viewing, qual doesn’t get any respect from quant, when it comes down to money quant always wins because numbers matter, it’s stuck in the past
  • But, we expect real insights from qual, a magician will create insights from our people
  • Consumer choice has three components – rational emotion and habitual
  • Qual is great at the rational part, consumers might overrationalize in a group
  • But 90% of decisions are emotional and habitual and we can only measure the tip of the iceberg here
  • We need a new qual experience
  • Case study of Lysol bathroom products – a bathroom cleaning product had much lower penetration than their toilet product, didn’t know how to change things outside of lavatory care, consumers really separated the two kinds of products
  • Wanted in home ethnography to watch what was happening in the home, shopping component, product trials
  • Had people buy any Lysol product they wanted to try as part of their regular shopping trip, learned people couldn’t find the product in the store, people bought colours because they thought that was the colour of the brand
  • Had people record them cleaning their bathroom for as long as it took them, no researcher intrusion, felt the tapes were the best way to do it because people forgot the cameras were there
  • In a qual session, had people fill in the blanks
  • Learned bathroom has many contradictions
  • People say they hate cleaning the toilet but observations showed it was easy to do, the toilet cleaning is habitual but it is very emotional and symbolic of other people’s germs, ‘it’s not my mess, it’s other people’s mess’, the biggest problem was the floor around the toilet but not anywhere else in the room
  • People put a lot of time into cleaning shower walls but it never comes up in discussions, many awkward and dangerous positions, but the dirt here isn’t emotionally charged, it’s dirt from soap and water not bodily fluid so there is no germs, vertical surfaces aren’t touching you, dirt doesn’t accumulate so it is not a germy area
  • People say they are germaphobes but their actions are cross contamination, people don’t like the smell of the products but they didn’t open a window or turn on a fan, and then at the end they smell that it is clean, they need the scent to know that it’s clean even if the smell is painful during the cleaning process, I know the product works because I just wipe it away but people were actually scrubbing really hard
  • The bathroom workout – people dress to prepare for a workout, many videos were too revealing, people often wear extremely minimal clothes to do it, i hate doing this job but I do it, just like going to the gym, don’t go fully clothes because they know they will sweat and need to move easily, some people have music in the background to motivate, some people take a shower right after because they want the first clean shower
  • The verdict – lysol known for disinfectant but not yet in bathroom cleaning, lysol is already seen as a bathroom specialist by consumers, but the brand category saw it as bathroom AND toilet, they already have a role in the bathroom so they just needed to tell consumers that they have bathroom products “From toilet to tub”
  • Traditional qual would only have uncovered habitual behaviours both good habits and bad habits, people may not discuss bad habits as much as good habits, it’s easy to rationalize emotions but then you don’t get at the truth, it’s barely rational but rather more about how people perceive themselves
  • Small sample sizes can lead to skepticism, toilet care business is huge so this is a big shift

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Global Transformation in Medical Technology VOC by Brian Bechard #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Global Transformation in Medical Technology VOC 
Brian Bechard, Global Innovation Specialist, Medtronic
  • 80% of people do not have access to the top notch health care that many of us in North America expect as common service
  • Traditionally, customers of medical products have been groups of doctors, physicians who are well compensated for their work. Sometimes, they can let doctors do real simulations with products in laboratory settings, the hospital administrator, the distributor, anyone who gets the medical devices to the users
  • Now, maybe our customer is the patient, the three year who has no clue what is going on
  • Did a project in India for three weeks to work on hearing screening of people in rural or economic disadvantages communities
  • Device was a phone with an attachment to take a picture of the ear and send it to a hospital in another country for diagnostics. No need to travel to a hospital from the beginning. Diagnosed many issues and decided which ones need to be referred to a hospital.
  • Who are the stakeholders – Patients, community health workers who go door to door doing the screening, family members who get the person to the hospital, superintendent of the hospital who restricts or allows access, clinic physicians to make referrals, community leaders who know the neighbourhoods and slums, hospital workers who know pregnancy birthing issues, nurses
  • Interview – lots of being present as opposed to recording questions and answers, a lot came through translators, community health workers would probe people for why they aren’t using their hearing devices and could sometimes make a quick tweak of a device to get it working,
  • Environment – Making business happen was very difficult, language barriers, people didn’t have easy access to water, it could be 25 people living in one tiny room or people living in tin roof canvas wall buildings, they have very few belongings but they have a TV and maybe a mobile device, they may not be able to go online and learning about hearing loss but they are aware of what’s going on in the world, there are male and female lines at the doctors, there may be four people on a motorcyle so think about how and who can get to the hospital, not allowed to determine the sex of a baby because some people may abort a female baby (so cannot let people see the ultrasound screen)
  • Key insights – people might get a partial dose of antibiotics because they wouldn’t finish the course if they didn’t work after a couple days, people might not go to the doctor for a slight pain because it would disrupt the household to find a ride, they may not trust what the doctor says, people were fascinated by a picture of their inner ear and this was a big draw to them, a cab ride to the doctor is the equivalent of a daily wage and no food for their family, it was disappointing for patients to find out their problem would not be solved on that day, infants weren’t being treated at all and so were missing vital growth opportunities regarding language and communication, need to hear is changing as families are in different cities and would need to talk on the phone, people with hearing ads are viewed as lower class or foolish or less than human

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Location Panels: Opting in to sharing your every movement Andrea Eatherly #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Location Panels: Opting in to sharing your every movement 
Andrea Eatherly, Head of Operations, Placed
  • privacy is a major issue, panel is triple opt-in – 1) download app, we will measure your location 2) second as downloading app 3) registering for panel
  • rewards are provided, lots of people are getting my data anyways so people might as well be rewarded for it
  • insights are all aggregated by demographics etc
  • in-store tracking is not opt-in, if your wi-fi is on, you are trackable
  • Opt-out approaches to location – little to no notification to consumer, no value exchange
  • Opt-in means they get demographics, they can send survey questions to create a loop
  • Understand store traffic, by demographics, in real-time, makes it possible to predict ups and downs in retail sales
  • Connect mobile to in-store activity – watch people search the internet at home and then see which stores they actually go into to shop for the product
  • can figure out whether people using certain apps are more likely to visit certain grocery stores
  • People who watched the biggest loser were more likely to visit fast food chains – an aspirational market
  • People who watched survivor are more likely to go to gyms, fitness stores – good for marketing purposes
  • Can see which shopping apps different retailer shoppers use – walmart vs target vs kohls vs JCPenney, those people all prefer different apps
  • What other stores are your starbacks shoppers going into, competitive stores?
  • Monitor whether ads people see on computer result in people going to the retail store
  • Information can be used to target ads to the right people – your consumers like these specific stores about these categories and these price points

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Information Overload: Avoiding drowning in online research data #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Information Overload: How do I avoid drowning in information from online focus groups, bulletin boards and communities? 
Moderator:
Debbie Solomon, Managing Director, Business Planning, Mindshare
  • How do you plan the front end for better data management: tell stores and then summarize them into top 3 lists with word clouds, have client prioritize key questions, during focus groups ask clients what they already knew and what is new to them, narrowly and clearly define your objectives so you don’t generate spurious information
  • Share your useful tips for dealing with large quantities of data: Use a tagging tool as it comes in, tell the story of the product and use the data to fill in the holes, use online tools to identify key findings in real time, color code transcripts, sample from the information
  • What are some tools that help you analyze large quantities of data: text analytics tools, envivo program, online tools help you organize your information, vendor platforms that have a lot of organizational components, use hashtracker, keep a searchable video library, QUMU to search keywords in videos

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Qualitative research goes online – a journey into qualitative online research by Susan Abbott #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Qualitative research goes online – a journey into qualitative online research 
Susan Abbott, President, Abbott Research
  • in 1985, 2000 computers connected to the internet, 100 devices connect to the internet every second today
  • in 1993, Marian Salzman built the first private online focus groupEmbedded image permalink
  • Landscape today – video self-ethnography, mobile snippets, blog diaries and so much more
  • it’s not about the device, maybe it’s about a type of interaction, it’s about the experience
  • Divide the entire landscape into real time and extended – forget synchronous and a synchronous
  • There are one-on-one interviews and group discussions
  • There is video, audio, images, text, diary data
  • A platform pulls all of these things together
  • Online focus group is text chat, what Marian invented. People who like it love it.  Moderator can use voice or video but participants only type.
  • Web enabled meeting – people talk, hangout, skype, could be one-on-one or a group.  Can even chat at the same time
  • Community platform – the whole shebang
  • Crowdsourcing is the worst – you can’t see what’s going on under the covers, what are people actually doing? are there any qualified moderators involved?
  • When did we decide that a focus group room is a natural location? their home is natural, a coffee shop is natural.
  • Advantages – location is anywhere, true anonymity, tremendous depth, creative designs, lower cost, longer durations or shorter durations, real world situations,
  • Disadvantages – quantity of data can be daunting (can we just ask one more question), clients can feel unengaged and lack the immediacy on real-time , no way to prevent people from taking pictures of concepts
  • Use ESOMAR guidelines on mobile, develop plans to engage internal teams. We don’t get into the suburbs as much as we ought to with offline research.
  • Recent research has generated as much volume as a book – 45 000 words from one study, far more that what you often see for a focus group
  • in 2010 – emailed flipcams to people and they sent pictures from home – eg woman used ATM because she had 2 kids and a dog in her car. important insight that they need drive through banking
  • Some people will provide multiple pictures and product descriptions of a single task – imagine all the product development you can pull from that. You can not get pictures of dogs bathing and babies playing with pets in a focus group
  • Online data can sometimes be brutally honest, some faking strategies are eliminated online
  • the markup tools are amazing, some give you heat maps, B2B can take a lot of time on complicated stimulus
  • Future? Pinterest with imagery, but sometimes a google search is not YOUR idea, it’s google’s idea
  • You CAN do a community of 15 people, it doesn’t have to be 150
  • We can do MORE with online ideation
  • Stop talking about mobile, it’s all mobile or it WILL all be mobile

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