Tag Archives: emotion

 Using Words to Measure Emotions: The Secret to Cracking the Quebec Code Grand Ballroom #MRIA2017 

Live note-taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Christian Bourque, Executive Vice President and Senior Partner, Leger, Doris Juergens, National Vice President of Strategy and Partner, NATIONAL Public Relations 

  • ‘Rest of Canada’ doesn’t exist, except to Quebecers
  • Are quebecers closer to France, English canada, or the USA? Data says those three equally. They are North American, they are french. THey do drink more alcohol, they do spend more on hygiene products.
  • Research asked people to choose words, how do they react to a variety of words.
  • French Quebec overindexes on tenderness, ingenuity, sensual, emotion, tolderance, warmth.  
  • Quebecers are less different than they think – they are identical on 70% of variables.  But the other 30% is huge. THey are more different than marketers think.
  • Joie de vivre is a huge difference. It belongs to francophones. They want to live in the moment, 30% more than anglophones. Financial literacy is poor in Quebec. Doing what I want dominates over doing the right thing in Quebec. They are about right here, right now, make the fullest of the present moment’.
  • ‘Enjoy yogurt’ would be English. “Orgasm yogurt’ would be quebecers – [yeah, the translation doesn’t work 🙂 ]
  • Canadians are yay-Sayers and quebecers are to the nth degree – they always say ‘yes but’
  • Quebecers donate less, volunteer less, more non-commital, more talk than action
  • Victim perspective, never responsible for their own destiny, it’s always someone else’s fault – this is why they’re more suspicious, non-committal 
  • Biggest fear is failure
  • Men are systematically depicted as idiots in advertising and no one says anything about it. It wouldn’t work n English market.
  • Parochialism – most older people come from small villages, small is beautiful, you know everyone, quebecers like to come together in small groups. Most want one of three Quebec stations. Top shows are produced in Quebec. THey want tto watch themselves, support themselves.
  • Don’t tell them you’re the best and biggest. You need to have humility, Use local spokespeople because they want to put a face on everything. President’s Choice wasn’t popular until the face of the brand was Gaylen Weston. You need french names, add a local face.
  • Coops and mutuals are very important – they reflect people coming together.
  • They are more instinctive, creative. They don’t hold levers of power so they have to make something out of nothing – creative, rebellious. 
  • They invented peanut butter!
  • Quebecers are prideful even though they feel they are victims. 20% intend to start their own business, up from 7% less than ten years ago.
  • Court of public opinion in Quebec is HUGELY important. INcluding mayors of cities with a few hundred people. They will pressure the Quebec which is called the national government. And they will put pressure on the federal govt. They will make any issue local and personal. 
  • Village first, then region, then province. 
  • You cannot use subtitles. You must translate and dub for Quebec french.
  • Consider using your own employees or customers, people with solid french names from the community
  • People will spot anything that suggests an ad that isn’t from Quebec and then not be convinced about the brand
  • Establish a relationship with people to give them a reason to like you
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Marktforschung.de showcase: quick summaries of 5 talks from German research companies #IIeX 

Live notetaking at #IIeX in amsterdam. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Realtime research in the digital age by Holger Geibler, YouGov

  • What do people think about research – political polls, representativeness, big data, how slow research is
  • What is real time research – can be from NOW to one week to complete, real time is related to historical timelines
  • We need to be where the respondent is, need to ask less, engage more, connect more – keep surveys under 16 minutes and avoid dropouts, remember than mobile surveys take 10 to 20% longer to complete
  • Let clients access data in real-time but tell them its preliminary, train clients and consultants to use a dashboard, have dashboards that switch between weighted and unweighted data

Reaching millennials via mobile apps and getting superior survey data through gamification by Jonathan Kurfess, Appinio

  • People want to share opinions even if you don’t want to hear it or don’t agree with it
  • #MRX is struggling to adapt to millennial user behaviour – longer questions are good for researchers but not for respondents
  • Money is not a sufficient incentive
  • An app that allows people to interact with each other, compare opinions, create polls and gather opinions is very engaging
  • Ensure questionnaires are mobile optimized

Germans got humor? Only if it’s efficient by Oliver Switzer, September Strategy and Foreshung

  • Do purchasers have emotions about steel? Of course they do. Emotion is involved with everything. Emotion isn’t just anger or disgust.
  • Germans like to be funny not just measure efficiency. Being funner is teh container, the vehicle.
  • Evolution made humans emotional, we used to be emotional about safety and now we’re emotional about product packaging
  • Our consciousness is there just to get orders from our subconscious
  • You can apply KPIs to emotions
  • Our brains is very activated when we see brand names we recognize versus made up brands
  • Our heart beats at different rates for different emotions, fear, trust, anger, skepticism, stress, relelvant, attraction, closeness [ask to see the charts, quite cool]
  • You can feel trust and skeptisism at the same time
  • [never occured to me to treat emotions as KPIs]

Implicit influence explained: how to define and measure the unconscious effects of words and images by Jonathan Mall, Neuro-Flash

  • People who though a zoo is safe even though a gorilla was supposed to have escaped assumed zoo handled the situation properly, these people read a certain type of newspaper
  • Priming means setting you up to feel something, lead to a preference, lead to a purchase
  • We could connect a gorilla to chocolate in a commercials, people who like one will like the other
  • You can’t simply look at one aspect of an ad, you need conscious and unconscious effects
  • people will say something looks good but their unconscious might be noticing the pretty lady on the side, if there is too much attention in the wrong place, then you have an issue
  • The four Ps: primal, priming, preference, purchase

Understanding emotion decision drivers using brain scans by Kai Muller, The Neuromarketing Labs

  • People don’t think how they feel, and they don’t say what they think and they don’t do what they way
  • We can map disgust in the brain as well as other emotions
  • Funny ads engage the heart and the min
  • Annoying ads evoke negative emotions and high attention
  • Positive and negative mentions can impact sales an this is measureable 
  • Were able to match the results of the ad concept with the finished ad

This year’s overused image was the iceberg, two of which appeared in this track. And the second iceberg speaker chuckled over it as his slide appeared. Sorry Homer’s brain, you’re last year. 🙂

 

IFF showcase: 5 presentation summaries #IIeX #MRX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in amsterdam. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

The electric light did not come from the continuous improvement of candles by Stan Knoops

  • Scent goes directly to the limbic system in the brain, the only sense to do that, hits the emotions directlyfr
  • Fragrance is hard to shut down because you must breathe, it’s hard to not smell something but you can not see or not hear something
  • Companies that have the sense of smell right make a difference [i do buy shampoo by smell, kids shampoos are the best!]
  • M&Ms don’t smell so they need to use other emotions
  • Consumers need scent but this changes over time, it’s not a change of needs but rather a stacking of needs, we don’t talk about the old needs, the table stakes, but they still need to be there
  • Think about laundry detergent, conumsers touch the fragrance at multiple point from shopping to hanging up to sleeping on; this is all very different for hand soap; its not a strong clean now, its a care for hands
  • Think about how the fragrance is released, eg the sun releaseing scent from drying laundry or fragrance released with high temperature of iron or only released during active body ovements [when you sweat?]
  • Three parts – gather data, analyze data, impact with data
  • Used to spend 95% of time gathering, 5% analyzing, 1% impact (the debrief)
  • We need to change this balance to 40/30/30 – how do we do this build a new S curve
  • Affinity for action, need to collaborate with consumers partners and internal team, need to to deep need discovery, need to story tell and visualize

Storytelling and forward looking orientation by Hans Lingeman (Winkle)

  • Need to use bold imagination, simple stories, and step outside of your world
  • For 5000 years, we were horse riders, it made a lot of sense to work in the horse business, you know what happened after that
  • Think of a world without electricity, we would be chopping wood within a week, you’d be walking everywhere (I’m good then!), but we don’t even think about it
  • Why does shampoo smell like fear to me, shy do we use shampoo every day since it was only invited in the 50s, shampoo will collapse someday
  • Science says its not great to wash your hair everyday, about half wash their hair every other day
  • What is the outsider’s perspective, what if there iesn’t electricity or shampoo
  • Let’s consider that the unthinkable is inevitable [i love this idea, how often do you do this?]
  • We must  pick up on the signals, if kids are wearing masks because of pollution what should the detergent companies do? Focus on freshness, teh grandparents know what nature smells like but the boy does not, he would change his clothes a lot because they smell, companies can share fragrances with him that he doesn’t know
  • Be prepared and know where to look
  • Technology lets us travel around the world physically and digitally, we have a fascinating future because of technology

Innovation by emotion by Steven Fokkinga, Emotion/Studio

  • When products and services collide with human behaviour
  • Micro emotions, emotional granularity, and emotions as the gateways to relevance
  • Products evoke more emotions than we realize
  • Top of mind products are the tip of the iceberg, unconsciously they influence our preferences
  • A Fitbit make syou feel curious, then you learn all of the things it can do, then you wonder can it help your health, then you realize how bad your health is, so many emotions along the way, how many emotions do you have about one product
  • Holistic experience scan, a panel of people who understand all the detailed emotions and know how to map them and score them
  • Emotional life is diverse, worry, confusion, anger, contempt, guilt, disgust, hate, sadness, anxiety, reluctance, doubt, etc
  • Researchers are often interested only in the positive emotions
  • Created formulates to generate specific emotions for flight attendants about to go in the air, showtime curtain to create anticipation, nature section to encourage care
  • Emotions reveal our deepest needs and values
  • Can you ask and receive or should you instead focus on values and aspirations, learn about their deep needs
  • Used the method with viewers and a news show, learned that the content of the news item need to guide the presentation of the format, let the newscaster be the guide not the teacher, other news shows are now following suit 
  • they have a list of 24 positive emotions

Storytelling and the power of data visualization by Mike Page, Blueocean Market intelligence 

  • Can you choose pretty visualization or functional visualizations, can you have both
  • Is the purpose of the chart to look pretty or communicate the insights
  • [oh, first use of Alexa] ALexa responded to the research question, we can interact with data via voice [oh, imagine giving your client an Alexa instead of a dataset!]
  • [i look forward to the day when live demonstrations just work and you dont question it ever]

Video beyond storytelling by Carl Wong, LivingLens

  • Video will soon be the vast majority of internet content and in many ways its inaccessible
  • How do we get from massive video content to shorter accessible video
  • How do you beat one very articulate and passionate consumer so why don’s we use video more? Because it’s painful to gather and curate
  • Half of executives would rather watch video than read text
  • If you use video just to answer an open end question then you’re missing something
  • Video is more than a 2 minute highlight reel or talking head
  • How much time have you spent collecting data and how little time have you spend Rudly analyzing it, we can automate the collection part so we can spend more time on the analyzing part
  • Analyze layers of data including speech or sentiment, facial emotional recognition, tone of voice recognition, Extremely useful at scale
  • Use video to understand how long different cultures brush their teeth, how different they brush their teeth
  • How people feel about preparing dinner, conversations during dinner, and treat these as datasets
  • Understand emotional spikes by demographic groups
  • What happens to social media listening when we switch over to video?

The evolution of insights: practicing what we preach: 6 summaries #IIeX #MRX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in amsterdam. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Power of human intelligence in the new era – man and the machine by Simon Edward and Seda Tokcan, (IBM)

  • Our personal lives have blurred, it’s an always on world, a do it yourself mentality prevails
  • Expertise still drives world progress, but what is the role of expertise
  • There are barriers associated with building expertise in the new digital era
  • Even simple analytics are not straightforward 
  • Human cognitive capacity is inadequate compared to what is required in today’s digital world
  • Advances are ushering in a new era of computing, no more punchcards, no more simply programming, now we’re in cognitive systems era
  • To error is human but to really mess things up requires a computer, now computers can learn and build expertise
  • What is so unique about human intelligence, ability to create a novel idea, ability to differentiate between causality and correlation, ability to combine intuitions with intelligence, ability to ask questions
  • The essence of being human is asking questions, not answering questions
  • Technology boosts the expertise of intelligence professionals – enhance, scale and accelerate expertise
  • computer system confirmed 99% of medical diagnosis but added diagnosis precision to 30% of them
  • Think of technology as an enabler, let it cut through the ego and bias of humans

Automation: Robot vs Researcher by Paul Albert (Zappistore) and Tony Costello (RB)

  • WHat used to take 6 months is now being done in hours and TV marketing budgets have gone up
  • Research budgets are continuing to decline for three years in a row
  • In fifteen years, half of Fortune 500 companies have disappeared
  • Data and digital requires more research to fuel profit, Netflix and uber have grown immensely but TASI and blockbuster are dying
  • We need lower cost and more speed but we also need validated methodologies
  • Do you delay until the method os fully validated or launch Asap
  • Business that don’t adopt technology are destined to fail, bravery is need to adopt new approaches
  • Now they can test many more ads for more brands and chose more effective ads

System 1 Driven Brand Insights by CHristian Ohm (Magda) and Karthik Posnanski (BrainJuicer)

  • Mazda has rebounded because of the product line, youngest
  • They moved from lower premium and generic to more premium and distinctive, premium experience not high price
  • Have a strong product perception but a weak brand image perception, most brands don’t
  • Fragmentation leads to a weak brand, in message or tone, sounds like a different brand in different markets
  • Took a co-creation approach, more people than marketing need to understand the brand – call Center, dealer, sales person
  • People knew the brands and could talk about them but there isn’t a lot of emotion but some people just love driving and are passionate about it, they want to deliver on this experience
  • Spirit of Hiroshima – challenger attitude, never give up, we can do it
  • Emotional connection is achieved when care and driver are in perfect harmony
  • Created a brand book to share with everyone
  • Tracking needs to be fast and actionable, cover emotions, simple and engaging, modular and flexible, adapt latest MR thinking, forward focused and predictive, strategic and tactical, more qualitative [excellent advice for research in general]
  • Considered fame, feeling, and fluency for brand growth

The nature of consumer emotion by Aaron Reid

  • Visceral factors theory – Lowenstein, falling asleep at the wheel – extreme deviation from a desired equilibrium point
  • It was a bold man who first ate an oyster – well, maybe a crazy person or simply a very hungry person
  • System 1 ans system 2 interact, it can’t be one or the other
  • The proportion of emotion model combines emotion and reason in a single predictive algorithm, we are more accurate in predictions if we use both
  • You can’t measure racism explicitly, emotion interacts with reason
  • We see eye tracking and emotion tracking of the Budweiser immigration ad, can see attention in the right places and emotion being positive or negative at the right moments
  • Adding implicit facial coding and implicit impact of ads greatly increases ability to predict virality of an ad
  • Need to quantify the emotions from pride, gratitude, and anxiety

Unilever’ innovation in action by Vijay Raj (unilever), @vijayiraj

  • They engaged with startups so they could increase the work with half the cost, half the time and better quality
  • Have worked with 800 startups in recent years – the Shark Tank, piloted 200, recruited 30 for research and the new way of doing business
  • Want to move away from asking to observing, people forget, they give estimates (not because they’re lying)
  • Used google glass technology and advanced video analytics
  • Move from asking to sensing, though people struggle to articulate emotions, FMRI, emotion coding, facial coding, they use facial coding on every ad
  • Why should we ask at all? Asking reveals needs, combine what people search for on google with what people say on social media to replace traditional research
  • Move from studying consumers to building relationships with people
  • The technology enables them to string together a more powerful story
  • Let’s move to “i have the answer what is your question’
  • The pyramid of tomorrow: Input powered by tech, output enabled by tech, outcome delivered by people
  • Make the leap from insights to ideas
  • They pay their vendors bonuses if they do a job well [fabulous idea, will you do this?]

Integrating new data sources to improve the value of your segmentation research by Hilary DeCamp (LRW)

  • Can you buy an ad for a segment?
  • Geolocation, attitudinal profiles, likely voters
  • Need to use machine learning and targeting to buy thousands of direct targeted ads
  • Microsegmentation has its use but you still need to use classic segmentation for higher level needs
  • Alternative lenses for segmentation – demographics are targetable in media, behaviors for usage styles of path to purchase, attitudes for believes about category or self, needs for key buying factors, occasion based for needs that vary by occasion
  • Right now demographics and behavior segmentation are highly used
  • Challenges with segmenting – surveys are too long and phones are too small, we don’t know what we don’t know, self report behavioural data is not very accurate or precise, targeting segments is hard to do in advertising
  • Can profile based on quantative data but people are bad with numbers, qualitative research brings richness and texture, plus can add real world behaviours like actual online activities or models propensities
  • Audiences are identified and you can message them differently by segment
  • The new tools are making classic segmentation more actionable than ever before

How America experiences Clinton & Trump, by Ryan Baum, @FocusVisionInfo #NewMR

Live note taking from the October 27, 2016 webinar. Any errors are my own.

  • Emotions evolved through natural selection and so are recognizable in humans regardless of language and culture
  • Pioneers
    • Paul Ekman, top psychologist noted by American Psychological Association and Time magazine, six basic emotions – anger, happiness, surprise, disgust, sadness, and fear
    • Robert Plutchik: Own emotion model added two more emotions to Ekman’s model – joy, trust, fear, surprise, sadness, anticipation, anger, and disgust. Plutchik’s model incorporates color so that rage is red, grief is blue, loathing is purple, colors we are familiar with
  • Valence: how positive or negative people feel about something. Neutral emotions are surprise or anticipation which can be positive or negative depending on the emotion, a good surprise or a bad surprise
  • What emotions do people feel towards the candidates? What intensity, what valence? And why do people feel this way?
  • GenPop USA of 2000 people who have seen or heard many things about both Clinton and Trump
  • Intent was not to predict but rather to understand voting behaviors so they included people who did and did not intend to vote
  • Audience invited to answer a survey: http://www.focusvision.com/Election2016 (oops! For USA people only so it looks like I want to vote but I refuse to J  )
  • People feel negative about both candidates, People feel the negative emotions at a higher intensity than the positive emotions, Independent voters feel equally negative about both candidates
  • Trump holds a monopoly on the surprise emotion
  • People feel more negative about trump in all regions, all ages and young people in particular, and all income groups
  • Based on open end verbatims they evaluated why those emotions were held for each candidate
    • Why does Hillary make people feel joy? Qualified, first female, good intentions, aligns with political views, best candidate
    • Why does Trump make people feel joy: Outspoken, new ideas, represents change, best candidate, aligns with political views, successful businessman, problem solver
    • Why does Hillary make people feelanger: dishonest, privileged, different political views, pro-choice on abortion
    • Why does Trump make people feel angry: bigot, egotistical, unfit, bad intentions, ignorant, bully, dishonest
    • Why does Hillary make people feel anticipation: winning, first female president, future accomplishment
    • Why does Trump make people feel anticipation: change, winning, what will he say or do next, actions as president
    • Why does Hillary make people feel fear: distrust, unfit, uncertainty, personal agenda, safety of our nation, no change from Obama, loose freedom, gun rights
    • Why does Trump make people feel fear: reckless, unfit, bigot, damage relationships, hateful agenda
    • Why does Hillary make people feel surprise: made it this far, first female president
    • Why does Trump make people feel surprise: outlandish remarks, made it this far, unpredictable, changes his mind
    • Why does Hillary make people feel sadness: dishonest, don’t want her to win, will hurt country, no change, poor past decisions, wanted Bernie to win, only wins because trump is worse
    • Why does Trump make people feel sad: offensive, people support him, he might win, will hurt America, no better republican
    • Why does Hillary make people feel trust: political experience, good intentions, similar political views
    • Why does Trump make people feel trust: businessman, outspoken, not a career politician, loves American, good intentions
    • Why does Clinton make people feel distrust: privileged, pro-choice, her husband’s affair, cunning, different political views
    • Why does Trump make people feel disgust: hateful, bigot, reckless, ignorant, rude, bully, egotistical
  • Candidates are trusted within their own party
  • 88% of millennials feels anger towards trump, 61% of females feel anticipation towards Clinton
  • People who like trump says he’s outspoken but people who don’t like him say he is hateful
  • Emotions are best measured over time
  • Now live results from the questionnaire we just answered (keep in mind the audience is researchers who know how questionnaires work, not people necessarily answering honestly)

votingimage

Neuroscience gets the stage (and so does an #AllMalePanel) #IIeX 

Live note-taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. ANy error or bad jokes are my own.

Inspiring vendors to go the distance for exceptional insights by Debbie Balch and Rairo Davila

  • Act as partners not vendors
  • Asked vendors for examples of their work to judge the quality of it, asked for references
  • Clear on setting up objectives and expectations of the research
  • Client showed the vendor examples of reports that worked well in his company
  • You might need to kiss a hundred frogs before you find your prince, trust is necessary but not easy
  • You need to guide the supplier, touch base regularly maybe once a week, not just to track status of project but also to express questions or explain something that has changed in the company
  • Both parties need to be willing to try new and innovative techniques to seek the truth
  • Be flexible and willing to shift
  • [moral of the story – be a nice person]

The brain science of buying by Susan Weinschenk

  • People buy when they feel confident of thir decision [well sometimes]
  • They may not ACTUALLY be confident but they feel they are ready to make the decision
  • It is an unconscious process that can result in a single neuron firing, you cannot be aware of a single neuron firing
  • You just need to make people confident enough to make that one neuron Fire
  • Sometimes you just need one person to say “good decision” to make that neuron fire
  • Dopamine is released when people anticipate, not when they get the reward, the feel good chemical
  • Dopamine makes you seek information, more dopamine is released when the reward is less predictable, we react a lot to unpredictability
  • Remember when the process to buy an iPhone was unpredictable and you had to get on a list that allowed you fill out a form which allowed you to get a phone which allowed you to get a phone, and you didn’t know when any of these things would happen or allow you to get a phone
  • Don’t be afraid to make people wait
  • Most decisions ar Meade unconsciously, 95% of thinking and decisions are unconscious
  • Researchers could predict what choice people would make 10 seconds before the person was award of having made a decisions – using an fMRI
  • People can make up an give you reasons but it probably isn’t the real reason
  • Don’t really on what people say
  • Most buying decisions involve emotions and feelings, not just logic and reasoning
  • If you can’t feel emotions then you can’t make decisions,  when people feel loyal to a brand they have a feeling to the brand, feeling is a precursor to making a decision [I like Ray’s definitions of loyalty – when logic says to do anything else but you do that]
  • People make either a goal directed value based buying decision or they buy from habit, not both
  • Don’t give people all the value information if they are asking a habit decision because people can’t do both at the same time


The real role of emotions in marketing by Caryl Weber

  • We need to reach consumers emotionally
  • The rise of “sadvertising” – brands want to are us cry
  • “A snack for anyone who is seeking experiences” great empty tag line 🙂
  • We are not thinking machines, we are feeling machines that think
  • Emotions guide us unconsciously
  • Why do you buy tide, mom uses it, friend uses it, like the colour, you’re guided to a habit forming purchase
  • Showing people pictures of something will make them more likely to choose something later on related to those pictures, even when it’s stages away in terms of something like Puma to cats to dogs
  • Go beyond words when you position a brand, embrace the messiness of abstract feelings and emotions, music, characters, images can be a brand statement or strategy document
  • How you say it may matter more than what you say – the lighting, the colours, language used, tonality – meta communication 
  • Feeling of an ad lasts longer than a rational message
  • Can build these feelings into the features of the packaging 
  • Emotions guide us unconsciously, brands are vast messy networks in the mind, meta communication is more important than you think


GreenBook research industry trends panel on the future of insights: Kevin Lonnie, Mark Simon, Cillin Manaois, Steve Phillips, Niels Schillewaert, Aaron Reid, Dave Carruthers

  • #AllMalePanel

Leveraging intuitive, emotional data more fully by Dan Hill #CASRO #MRX

Live blogging from Nashville. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

– are you a purist or pragmatist about quality? [i like to think i’m both. you know what’s right. do it right. i don’t see why that’s so difficult]
– why do we need a revolution? maybe self-report doesn’t always work. men report using 1.6 billion condoms, women 1.1 billion condoms per year. but companies only sell 600 million per year. [hmmmm… who to believe :)]
– 95% of our behaviour is subconscious. how are surveys doing in this area?
– 95% of water below the waterline of the titanic is what sank it
– not everyone can be honest with themselves, not everyone understands why they do things, not everyone wants to be honest with you or themselves about why they do things
– you cannot think your feelings, you have to feel your feelings
– self-reported information is always filtered
– emotional metrics are subconscious – recall, call to action, preference, satisfaction, loyalty
– it’s not simply left brain, right brain. the emotional brain sends 10 times as much to the other side as it receives
– you can’t rewire the human brain. we are closer to homer simpson than Spock
– you can ASK when people are engaged during a commercial or you can measure each second
– in a commercial, people turn off in the last 5 seconds when it turns to the sell job [pay attention conference presenters]
– when people are asked to move a dial to show how they’re feeling, they forget to move the dial. that’s not very accurate
– people are particularly bad at sharing opinions about negative feelings.
– charles darwin did work on emotions – emotions are universal, even blind people across cultures has the same facial expressions, face is spontaneous and fast as the muscles are attached directly to the skin, we have more facial muscles than anywhere else on the body
– theory refined by Paul Ekman, matched emotions to specific muscles
– believes facial coding in 3 years will be good enough and ready to go [i’ll take that bet 🙂 ]
– fMRI brain scans were the closest to their manual facial coding. automated facial coding isn’t there yet
– 40% of time during commercials have no reportable emotion. really, it’s not as interesting as the birth of your child.
– best joke of all time, you might laugh for 4 seconds
– political campaigns are the energizer bunny of fake social smiles
– people will say they are happiest for 12 seconds but that’s just not reality
– surprise and anxiety often go together
– need self report, we need all the data we can get and self report is about as good as other data right now
– there are many things that people won’t tell you, perhaps you can see it in their face

Is Facebook the only emotional manipulator? #MRX

If you haven’t heard of the Facebook ‘scandal’ by now then I’m jealous of the holiday you’ve just taken on a beautiful tropical island with no internet access. The gist of the scandal is that the feeds of 689,003 people were curated differently than everyone else to gauge the subsequent effect on emotion.

While most people’s feeds are curated based on which friends you like, share, and comment on more often, the feeds of these people were curated in addition, by considering the positive and negative words they included. In both conditions, Facebook chose which of your friends’ posts you would see though in the Test condition, you might be offered a greater proportion of their positive or negative posts. The conclusion was that you can indeed affect people’s emotions based on what they read. You can read the published study here.

I honestly don’t know where I stand on the ethics of this study right now. Ethics interest me but I’m not an ethicist. So instead, let me think about this from a scientific point of view.

Do you deliberately manipulate emotions in the work you do? As a marketing researcher, your job is ONLY to manipulate emotions. You know very well that this brand of cola or that brand of chips or the other brand of clothing cannot boast better taste, feel, look, or workmanship. All of those features are in the eye, or taste buds, of the beholder. Through careful research, we seek to learn what makes different kinds of people happy about certain products so that marketers can tout the benefits of their products. But, at the same time, we also seek to learn what disappoints and makes people unhappy about the products and services they use such that those weaknesses can be exploited by marketers.

Through a strange twist of fate, a colleague and I recently conducted a tiny study. We found the results quite interesting, and wrote a quick blog post about it. Then the Facebook news broke. As Facebook did on a larger scale, I will confess that I manipulated the emotions of about 300 people.

Previously, I saw on a number of studies that age breaks are inconsistent. Sometimes researchers create an 18 to 34 age break, and other times they create an 18 to 35 age break. In other words, sometimes you’re the youngest person in a group, and sometimes you’re the oldest person in a group. Would you rather be the oldest person in a young group, or the youngest person in an old group? What did we find? Well, people did indeed express greater happiness when they were part of the younger group, even though they were the oldest person in that group. I deliberately and knowingly manipulated happiness. Just like Facebook did. Do you hate me now? Do you think I’m unethical? You can read the post here.

As marketing researchers, every bit of research we do, every interaction we have with people, is intended to manipulate emotions. We collect data that marketers use to criticise our favourite products. We collect data so that politicians can directly criticise other politicians through their negative ad campaigns. Has that bothered you yet? Has that bothered you enough to warrant outcries in social media? Have you campaigned for an immediate ban of television, radio, and viewing products on the shelves at supermarkets knowing that those things are intended to manipulate our emotions?

Since you know that your research is intended to affect emotions, do you inform your research participants about the potential negative consequences of participating in your research? Do you tell them that seeing their age in the older age bracket may make them unhappy, that viewing critical ads may make them unhappy, that being asked to select up to five negative attributes might make them unhappy?

Given that we’ve done it this way for so long, have we become complacent about the ethics of the research we conduct? In this age of big data, is it time to take a fresh look at the ethics of marketing research?

[Originally published on Research Live]

 

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Emotions and Client Priorities #MRMW #MRX

Welcome to this series of live blogs from the Market Research in the Mobile World Conference in Cincinnati. With so many sessions, I’m only blogging about a few sessions each day. All posts appear within minutes after the speaker has finished. Any errors, omissions, or silly side comments are my own.  I’ll also be providing end of day summary blog posts for Esomar so keep your eyes peeled for those as well.

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David Johnson Decooda: Emotions to Business Value

  • “I’m willing to pay for anything as long as I don’t already know it”  [seriously? then why are you running surveys?]
  • Basic sentiment – relates to social media or mobile. It’s not just thumbs up and thumbs down.
  • Emotions have affect and valence: WHAT is the emotion and how STRONG is it.
  • Profiles include psychographics, demographics, and personas. And it changes all the time.
Bryan Dorsey, John Deers; Mark Lloyd – P&G; Michelle Lemiere, Alcon Labs: Client Priorites and Vendor Value
  • [This is a panel discussion. my comments aren’t attributed to individual people]
  • Focus on your core competency and tell why what you do is different and why we should focus on it
  • Vendors are anxious to work with you and then clients have to rewrite the reports to be relevant to your company, clients can tell a junior person who doesn’t know the business wrote the report
  • Some clients just want better than “gut.” Don’t have time or money for a full report.
  • Clients need the unfiltered view of consumers, whatever the methodology
  • Clients would trade the technology or the method to work with the right people
  • Clients most impressed when vendors bring insights to the table right at the beginning [do you mean free research? ask chuck chaprapani about that 🙂 ]
  • Not impressed with breadth. Prefer we do this one thing really really well. [agree, do everything kinda crappy or one thing right. otherwise it feels like carpet bombing]
  • Vendor says  “Here is what we need” and client responds “here is what we do.” This is completely unacceptable.
  • Clients use case studies and word of mouth to find/choose vendors
  • Pay for performance is a difficult model because good research leaves you with even more questions.
  • Procurement is the dad on the porch holding the shotgun
  • If you claim you are a global company that you ought to be global with offices in each country, and you actually work with the people in your other offices
Roxana Strohmenger: Forrester
  • A group discussion of what we’ve learned so far
  • Mobile is a disruptive device, our environments are no longer device free, 40% of consumers use their smartphone on the toilet
  • By 2016, 70% of the worlds population will have a mobile subscription
  • Consumers are already using mobile to answer survey whether we want them to or not, even the really long, really complicated surveys.
  • Can we be device agnostic? Will your research work on smartphones, tablets, laptops…
  • Once methods are device agnostic, can you really combine the data as if there are no differences there. [fabulous point]
  • Device agnosticity is a necessity but don’t do it when it’s not the right thing to do
  • Websites know when you’re viewing a website on a phone or a laptop so why don’t surveys do this?

Emotion Mining by Thomas Snyder #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats of @Conversition. This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

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The Neuroscience of It All
Thomas Snyder, MD PhD, Chairman and Founder,
Emotion Mining

  • Why and what to motivate people to buy our products?
  • Decision making is options, prices, promotions which is rational. Add the smartphone to that. There is clutter and noise and bias. This interferes with all decisions.
  • Clutter is the environment, including the internet. Noise is the influence. Bias is the kind of day we are having, our moods, and temperaments.
  • The market place is motivation overload. For information overload, look at the words. For motivation overload, look at the colours.
  • Our methods identify the book we bought, not the book we want to buy.
  • Self-report is the core of our methods. it is rational. It lies about true feelings.  People acquiesce, or don’t care, or hate it.
  • Subconscious mind plays a role in all decisions. We experience conflicting emotions at the same time.
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