Author Archive: LoveStats

Changing the game: Sports Tech with the Toronto Argonauts and the Blue Jays, #BigDataTO #BigData #AI

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference inToronto 

Panel: Mark Silver, @silveratola, Stadium Digital; Michael Copeland, @Mike_G_copeland, Toronto Argonauts; Jonathan Carrigan, @J_carrigan, MLSE; Andrew Miller, @BlueJays, Toronto Blue Jays

  • There is a diverse fan base across all Toronto teams, and their preferences and values are diverse in terms of who are they and what drives them to watch and attend games. There are many segments of people not just ‘fans.’
  • Fandom takes many shapes and sizes and you always need to grow and rebuild the fan base. You can’t appeal to only avid fans. You must also appear to casual fans. You need to go beyond the narrow focus of superfans.
  • The strategy of loyalty programs is that they are an engagement tool to gather data for mining, generate in-game activation, let people win prizes by participating, help partners better understand the fans, and this creates wins across the board – for the team, the partners, and the fans. 
  • The teams want to learn what people are doing during the game as opposed to guessing. Which benefits do they use their points for, what do they choose at the concession stand, are they watching road games. And this is not just for season ticket holders but people across North America watching games. We need to use the data to learn how to scale beyond ticket holders.
  • People want more meaningful and personal relationships with their sports teams. We need to learn what food they want, what environment they want in the venue, what relationships they want outside of the game. And we need to filter out the noise and deliver.
  • We’ve all done the analogue research. It’s been done for 100 years and it’s not unique to sport. How do we use technology to do it better now. WHO – we need to stop guessing and start using more efficient research. This massive data we have will tell you many things like WHAT do they want. They might want NEW THINGS that you didn’t offer before, an app, an emoji. The data will also ASSIST your team with player recruitment and roster management. We’ve been doing all this for ages and now we want to do it better, more efficiently, most cost effectively.
  • Big data is not free though. Not all stadiums have wifi to do wifi research and it’s expensive to invest in putting wifi in a stadium. We need to spread the cost among multiple agencies.
  • This isn’t a technology project. Rather it’s a people project. For instance, a chef can do vastly more with ten ingredients than I can. We need to change the way we engage with fans and leverage partner relationships. Yes, we’re investing in technology but the focus is people. We need to translate tools for each part of the business, reimagine how we engage with fans, and how we make a profit. You can buy a beautiful car but you need to learn to drive to take full advantage of that new car.

Cognitive Analytics: Enabling assisted intelligence in human resources recruiting and hiring by Noel Webb, @CognitiveHR, Karen.ai, #BigDataTO #BigData #AI

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • He realized that HR teams were spending too much time prescreening resumes before they could even meet with the best candidates
  • Recruiters only spend 6 seconds reviewing a resume which means they end up accidentally discarding some of the best ones. Time crunches mean they may only be able to get through 20% of candidates. ML can solve these problems .
  • 75% of candidates who apply to jobs do not hear back from the company because there are simply too many candidates and not enough time to do so. NLP and chatbots can solve this problem.
  • AI will not steal all jobs but it will automate processes and allow you to engage with potential hires in a more meaningful way.
  • Shortlisting is a huge challenge for HR as reducing a huge list of resumes into a screened list takes a lot of detailed attention. Technology such as direct keyword matches aren’t the best option as they eliminate people with relevant skills but not the exact words. For instance, know R is just as good as knowing SAS but a keyword search wouldn’t know that. NLP would work much better.
  • Personality insights can also be collected using sentiment analysis to get a functional understanding of the Big 5 Personality traits. [Wow, I can’t imagine how valid it is to do personality assessments with resumes which are often written by third parties and without traditional grammar and style]
  • Chatbots can take an applicant through hiring and onboarding processes by answering questions that would normally be asked of an operations officer. [imagine how many stupid questions the chatbot would be asked that new hires are too scared to ask people]

The ideology of data by Sasha Gryjicic, @SashaG, Dentsu Aegis Network, #BigDataTO #BigData #AI #Intelligence

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • Data marketing and artificial intelligence are headed in the wrong direction
  • Marketing is the pursuit of convincing someone they need something, marketing is a commercial outcome to propel the broader economy forward, marketing uses media and communications to convince, largely based on human language
  • Data is a digital expression of something in the world, organized and stored in many ways. We are finally getting the external world to use a single language but we can’t read this language. Humans don’t read binary code or extrapolations of code. 
  • Data violates the notion of scarcity and data is almost always out of both time and space context for necessity. Data is necessarily incomplete and it is not that thing itself. Data has inherent biases, is super messy, and contradictory
  • We use data to optimize things that have already happened, or we generalize what we learn from data to engineer more of those outcomes, e.g., when managing an online store, we optimize data to get optimal business outcomes but this doesn’t help us learn why or what drives the decisions
  • Intelligence is the ability to gather, category, organize inputs, store, reflect, and respond to them. For humans, intelligence is innate, structured, organized, and process oriented. We have a fixed capacity of intelligence and are creative with it. It is not the result of external stimulus.
  • Language is the best way for humans to get access to our intelligence. It’s the language we use when we think. We talk to ourselves more than we talk to others. 
  • The AI we’re building is like automated statistics. We brute force relationships and create a black box of intelligence. We don’t understand why a computer makes certain decisions because we cannot hold enough variables in our mind to understand. Are algorithms intelligence or optimization? We are drifting further from understanding what intelligence really is. It’s not AI at all.
  • We’re accelerating the fatigue of positive reinforcement. We’re following bad after bad. We’re heading away from language which is the only way to understand ourselves. 
  • Intelligence seems to include morality, the ability to store and reflect and take decisions based on reflections.
  • We need to back away from disorganized data. We need to pause and relfect on what we see in the data to understand ourselves better. We need to dive into our own intelligence better. Reflecting on something is more important that acting on something.

Future of the smart home by Emily Taylor and Manish Nargas, IDC Canada, #BigDataTO #SmartHome #ConnectedHome #AI

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • By 2020, every home will have 40 connected devices – TV, appliances, health, assistance, security 
  • Wearables help consumers track and log their activities such as wellness goals, athletic training, weight loss monitoring, medication reminders, gamification of activities. 1 in 5 Canadians currently own a device as a wristband or a watch and 70% of those owners have no plans to upgrade or replace. 60% of consumers are not interested in wearables at all. Designs will be less obvious, have improved battery life, and use new materials like smart fabrics. Medical devices will have better reliability and validity and this will help the healthcare sector and be relevant for insurance companies
  • Security devices – smoke alarms, motion sensors, doorbells, security systems, remote home monitoring. These devices offer peace of mind. It’s no longer about emergency services but monitoring to see if the kids are home, a window is opened, the jewelry box is still there, perhaps even see if it’s a friend or foe at your front door. 
  • Home automation – these devices will help us reduce energy usage, increase safety including devices such as thermostats, light switches, outlets, appliances. IKEA has launched a smart home lighting system with wire-free lighting at a lower cost than their competitor. They will bring this technology into every piece of furniture and curtains [window blankets 🙂 ]
  • Personal health devices – These devices will result in increased awareness of monitoring. Health monitoring will take place from the home not a hospital and will result in fewer trips to the doctor and hospital. Connected clothing will help with this. Gym equipment brands now sync with health monitoring devices so you can monitor treadmill and walking together and get more consistent results. 
  • Intelligent assistants/bots – more natural way to interact with machines, removes the complexity of interconnections, vocalizes thought and activity, uses real time machine learning. Low adoption rates in Canada but many bots aren’t available in Canada. Connecting a speaker to the internet isn’t revolutionary but it can improve personalization. 60% of Canadians don’t care about bots but bots are here to stay. It is Alexa and soon will be your butler. It will be ubiquitous.
  • There are gaps. Many devices are siloed right now. They have limited conversations with other smart home devices. The market is too focused on DIY right now as people want to solve specific problems not do the entire home in one shot. There is little support across the solutions. 
  • Do you need a smart-fork that monitors how quickly you eat? Do you need this fork to connect to your lights and smoke alarm?

When will we drive autonomous vehicles, by Kashmir Zahid, Ericsson Digital Services (Great talk) #BigDataTO #BigData #AI #Automation

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • 1996 GM introduced Onstar. It had a weak interface, few features, and was mainly designed to offer roadside assistance.
  • 2010 saw in-car navigation but it still wasn’t user friendly nor easy to operate while you were driving.
  • 2012 Tesla built an all electric car and people could finally see the possibilities of vehicles with electricity and connectivity. Now that vehicles had so much digital, manufacturers could no longer stay in the shadows and let dealerships handle all the consumer interactions.
  • 2014 Apple CarPlay and android auto were introduced. Connectivity was embedded in the car from the time it was installed in the factory as opposed to being added by the consumer after the fact. 
  • 2015 remote diagnostics are now available, repairs can now be recommended by the vehicle rather than going to the dealership or following the manual. 
  • 2015 Tesla creates autopilot, a self guiding car but the user is still expected to take physical control when needed. 
  • 2017, the Google car is no longer a science project, it is a reality. 

At CES, three trends were noted

1. cars will be integrated into your life and communicate with your personal device, e.g., your home will be ready to receive you when you arrive, the temperature is set appropriately, the lights are turned on, the garage door is opened, and the turkey is ready to be taken out of the oven

2. Automation will create a natural experience of talking to your car, Alexa is winning here [although it just accidentally bought Whole Foods so I don’t know about the quality at this point]

3. Car to car communication – this will allow vehicles to see and talk to each other, so they can maintain speed and safety among other cars on the road

  • Now that everything talks to everything, our user experiences will be completely transformed. 
  • By 2020, 90% of cars will be connected
  • 4 trends in the industry

1. Cars must be connected, software defined car

2. Electrification, ITS, infrastructure

3. Automation, connected automated mobility

4. New business models, multi industry ecosystems

  • This is the largest change in transportation since Ford’s model T
  • Soon, we will have everything we need to travel but we won’t own the car. [Think of music, we no longer own the music we buy and we could lose it instantly if Apple decides to shut something down]
  • Insurance will depend on how you drive, your telemetrics. And later on, insurance won’t be necessary as human drivers won’t be responsible for safety. 
  • Emergency assistance providers will be affected as cars will have embedded systems that alert first responders instantly to ask if you are safe. 
  • Government providers will need to reconsider what legislation is needed to take care of drivers and roads. 
  • 13 out of 14 of the big vehicle manufactures plan to make an autonomous vehicle in the next couple of years
  • Google, Apple, Intel, Microsoft and Amazon have focus and investment in self driving car projects. Telecom operators like AT&T, verizon, Vodafone see the potential of new revenue in self driving car. Uber, Lyft, DIDI and many other startups are trying to disrupt the traditional car ownership model. 
  • The passenger economy will be worth $7 trillion by 2050. 
  • We are about to see consumer mobility as a service – one stop shop for transportation for everyone who doesn’t own a car [this is amazing for people who don’t know how to drive, are too old to drive, too young to drive, not well enough to drive] 
  • This will save over half a million lives due to safety from fewer accidents. And, it will free up your time since you don’t have to physically drive.
  • We are two years away from letting people sleep in a Tesla on long road trips where the car has not made the trip before – Elon Musk
  • Challenges

1. Public safety – people need to trust the machine to work while they sleep. 

2. Data privacy and security – who has, uses, and sells my data. It’s not transparent right now. 

3. Rules and Regulations – Who is liable for an accident? Who owns the vehicle that caused the accident?

  • Connected cars will open multiple innovative services. 
  • They will improve the efficiency and security of new value added services for both consumers and enterprises. 

Highlights from Day 1 of the #BigDataTO Conference #BigData #AI

I’ll admit I didn’t have high hopes. How good could a free conference about big data and artificial intelligence be? Especially if the upgrade tickets, which I so frugally declined, were only $75? Well, I was pleasantly surprised.

Let’s deal with the negatives first. The morning registration line was long and it took some people 30 minutes o get through it. The exhibition hall was small with not nearly as many vendors as I am used to seeing at conferences. There was no free wifi in the main hall (um, admission was free so why do we deserve free wifi too?). Sometimes the sessions were so packed, there wasn’t even room to stand. And, some speakers didn’t even show up because, well, airplanes.

However, those negatives were completely washed aside with the positives. Some of the talks were quite good. Some of the speakers were quite good. The topics were quite good. They gave out free conference programs. And did I say free? Some free things are worth what you paid for them. This one was worth a lot more. I highly advise you to go and it’s definitely on my 2018 conference schedule as time well spent.

So, here are a few tidbits of knowledge from a bunch of different speakers that intrigued me today.

  • Data science is often handled at the tail-end of a project. We only take the time to learn what happened after the fact and when it’s too late to do anything about the current situation. We need to do a better job of using our data for the future – for segmentation, targeting, to understand what our customers want, to uncover blind spots.
  • Good data scientists care where the data came from, who created it, what it represents. They don’t just take the data and run it through stats programs and spit out reports. It’s not just about statistics and reporting. Data quality must come first.
  • The real money is not in having the data but rather in knowing what questions to ask. Literally everyone has data but only the companies that hire the smart brains to ask the right questions will succeed with big data.
  • You might think using artificial intelligence is very impersonal. On the contrary. It’s impossible for a human being to be personal with hundreds and thousands of people but AI allows you to be far MORE personal  with thousands or millions of people.
  • Computers and artificial intelligence need to learn the senses – for instance, they need to learn to see the types of moles on skin that will become cancer, learn to hear which wheels on a train are cracked and about to cause a train wreck.
  • Algorithms are what make computer see and listen and as such algorithms are the future. Soon, companies will brag about their algorithms not their data.
  • We need to let computers do the pattern recognition so that humans can do the strategizing and reasoning
  • If you want to work with big data but can’t afford it, have no fears. So much software is free and open source. You can do anything you want with free tools so don’t let dollars hold you back from doing or learning.
  • The danger with artificial intelligence is training it with bad, untrustworthy, biased data. We’ve all seen the reports of AI perpetuating racism because the training data contained racist data. You must choose good datasets that are clean and genuinely unbiased and only then will you find success.

The next generation of market research and insights creation #IIeX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors are my own.

Panel: The Next Generation of Market Research & Insights Creation
;
Moderated by Leonard Murphy (GreenBook) with panelists Chris Enger (Periscope by McKinsey), Tamara Char (Periscope by McKinsey), & Simon Chadwick (Cambiar)

  • Periscope by McKinsey is a suite of tools for collecting learnings, analytics
  • Our entire industry is fragmented, over half of companies that source data did not exist ten years ago and they may not exist ten years form now
  • Technology is not the driver of change, client needs and circumstances are the drivers of change, they are being asked to do far more with budgets lower than they used to be, they much get creative
  • Behavioural data and analytics techniques to analyze that data is suddenly easily available and analyzable, this changes everything about being able to identify insights and work in an agile way, can get to 80/20 answers more quickly, we don’t need the 100% answer, we need to make progress on problem solving
  • Are analytics pushing the business forward, are the ‘researchers’ falling behind and failing to get seat at the table?
  • Need to elevate the quality and consistency of data so that the leadership is never getting three answers to the same question nor are employees hearing diverging answers
  • You must have a c-suite leader and hopefully the chief financial officer who has a longer tenure in a company, not the chief marketing officer
  • The CMO needs to spend time developing strategies not waiting to get data, let the machines do the heavy lifting so the team can spend their time strategizing
  • What is the role of the methodologist, understanding fit for purpose of all the tools, this is why we’re seeing so much fragmentation, 
  • In the USA, people are attracted by tools. In the EU, they are more focused on ideas and creativity, and try to be creative all through the entire process. Need to be less technologically focused in the USA. 
  • Try assigning various people on th c-suite to BE a person in a segment, have them go shopping for her, experience her, all to get them to empathize more clearly, because c-suite lives are so completely different from their segments
  • Is automation a dirty word? Machine learning templates and speeds everything up, may eliminate bias of an individual person although it will perpetuate bias that exists within the data
  • We need to present data for ten minutes and then discuss the oilers and solutions for the remaining 50 minutes

Panel: The GRIT Report & Future Impacts
; Moderated by Leonard Murphy (GreenBook) with panelists Aaron Reid, Ph.D (Sentient Decision Science), Patricia Chapin-Bayley (Toluna), Rick Kelly (Fuel Cycle) & Isaac Rogers (20|20 Research)

  • Automation is mostly used for analysis of surveys data, charting and infographics, analysis of text data, analysis of social media, sampling
  • “My clients aren’t asking me for social media data” no they aren’t, they’re asking someone else
  • Automation frees up time to expand capacity and do more, many things will soon be automated. We must adapt to this or fall by the wayside.
  • Buyers are slow to adopt automation, automation is a dirty word because they think it is DIY and it will be more work. It will actually free up resources and allow you to do more once you are trained and moving forward.
  • Do you want to be at a data collection conference in five years or at an insights conferences? Your business must adopt automation.
  • People don’t CARE if you automate, they want better research insights and thinking. You must have automation to get there.
  • Automation may not cut your budget but it allows you to move your budget into higher value endeavours.
  • What should samplers do? Advise on representativity, enforce length of interview limits, consult on questionnaire design, restrict to mobile only, forbid mobile-unfriendly. it is an absutive relationship – clients don’t want to pay for consumer friendly and respectful questionnaires.
  • There is no such thing as a non-mobile study. Every device must work and work well. You cannot run a survey without mobile respondents or you are guaranteed a nonrepresentative sample. Why is this even a conversation?
  • If you aren’t thinking mobile first, you are being stupid. We spend half of our time on our devices.  It is a data quality issue. [Cannot agree with this comment enough]
  • Educating the researcher of the future – they need critical thinking and storytelling skills. We all need to be critical thinking experts, you shouldn’t in the business without that.  We need to train the current workforce on how to do this. We’ve trained people on how to run cross-tabs but they need training on storytelling and turning insights into action.
  • Quick research doesn’t have to be quick and dirty or poor quality
  • The technology doesn’t matter, the platform doesn’t matter, we need to stop talking about the technology and focus on consultation, understanding the problem 

Future tech: Real-time feedback, video, and agile research #IIeX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Chaired by Marc Engel 

Service Recovery, Gurt and Paul from Feedtrail

  • [presented with 11 minutes notice so huge kudos to you!)
  • Customer feedback program that measures the experience immediately not 2 days or 2 months from now
  • Helps you ensure the appropriate person knows about the problem immediately so the issue can be resolved immediately
  • You don’t need to wait until the end of your hotel experience to give your review of the bed or the bathroom. Give your review now so they can fix things when you still need them fixed,

Email is Dead. PowerPoint is Dead. Smart Video is Now the Killer Way to Communicate Insights! By Paul Field (Touchcast) 

  • [they set up a live green screen, he’s running all his slides from his cell phone]
  • It’s easier to talk with people using video, more memorable, more expressive, more human
  • You can show videos, products, documents, polls, surveys, quizzes but also be on the screen yourself to point at things or write on the screen
  • They’ve included instagram style filters but nobody uses them. But of course people would be upset if there were no filters 🙂
  • Bit.ly/touchastlive

Empathy: The Real Killer App for Insights by Katja Cahoon (Beacon) 

  • [game to play: write down all the numbers she will say and answer the questions that are to come]
  • Most people write down the four primary colours, bed/table/chair/desk, and Einstein.  Most people choose the same set of common words due to stress and bias, stereotyped, programmed ways of thinking. It’s hard to break out of them during pressure. It happens so during brainstorming sessions too.
  • You can ask questions a different way and get completely different answers. Questions help you develop empathy.
  • Perspective taking – consider from the perspective of the consumer, do you feel you know everything, have you walked in the consumers shoes, have you worn the adult diapers yourself?
  • Don’t judge – is your team diverse or biased?
  • Recognize the emotion in others – do we truly feel what they’re feeling or are we just measuring it
  • Communicate the emotion and understanding – use cocreation 
  • Get out of the well worn thought pathways and brush aside the stereotypes

How to Drive Smarter Product Decisions with Agile Research by Thor Ernstsson (Alpha)

  • Old research is gated decision making, decisions are irreversible, consensus is required.
  • Agile research is high velocity, decisions are reversible, there is disagreement and committment
  • We aren’t building space ships, it’s basic products
  • The problem is never the idea, most people are in their jobs because they know what they are doing
  • It’s okay to launch small decisions that are wrong and reversible that you can continually improve on
  • Change your bias from planning to acting, change from being comfortably predictable to uncomfortably unpredictable, go from upfront exhaustive research to iterative experimentation
  • Be ruthlessly outcome oriented

Merck Showcase – Eye tracking, Values, and Navigating Controversy #IIeX 

Live notetaking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.
Unlocking consumer insights: Navigating controversy using behavioural sciences to change  the conversation by Lee Carter  and Lisa Courtade

  • Crises are always around us, there is no time to think, we’re always under pressure to think and act immediately
  • It’s never been more difficult to be heard. If you don’t tell the story, someone else will. And they might tell it negatively. 
  • Just because you are right does not mean people will believe you. And often, the facts just don’t matter.
  • We’re always on the defensive. Our attempts to correct the record fail. 
  • Crises are emotional and our messages should be emotional as well. We must engage people before we can persuade them.
  • Just because the message makes US feel better doesn’t mean it’s the right message
  • Impact – how personal and emotional is the impact, what are the priorities that are impacted. What is the impact of healthcare, the soda tax to me personally.
  • Values – what beliefs and fears does the issue raise, what underplaying moral foundation is at play. 
  • Language – what language and rhetoric is being and could be used to address the issue
  • Show people you understand why they are upset, show you want the same things they want, show you’re doing something about it, show there’s always room for improvement
  • This can’t take 18 days like it did for United Air, that hurt the entire airlin industry not just them
  • Messaging is rarely prepared in advance. This slows our response time which is damaging. 
  • We need to be in hero mode, not react mode.

Unlocking insight to foster innovation: a values link journey by Andy Ford and Steve Schafer, Brado Creative Insight

  • Learning interesting things is not insight – insight is fresh intimate understanding that has the power to genuinely change behaviour 
  • “I never knew I always wanted this” this is insight. You can only get to insight with empathy.
  • Need to understand values first so take the time to truly understand the consumer, interview theme to understand who they are and WHY they think what they think
  • How does KFC become a breakfast destination? [I am totally open to chicken and waffles 🙂 ]
  • There are key drivers for breakfast – “my time”. The “first bite” needs to be familiar flavours, smells, and textures, a multi sensory experience to set the tone for the rest of the day. 
  • Consumers want a craveable first bite of breakfast but it still has to be familiar. [I think these people are way more into breakfast than I am. Wow.]

Unlocking attention: how eye tracking is boldly going where no market researchers have gone before by Mike Bartels, Tobii Pro

  • Eye trackers used to be stationary and invasive. Now, they’re just a pair of glasses.
  • Why study visual attention – 50% of all neural tissue is related to vision
  • Eye tracking applies to attention in the workplace, training and skill transfer, fatigue and workload analysis, efficiently and error reduction [this is huge for air traffic control and other high stress jobs that have people’s lives on the line]
  • Use eye tracking along with augmented reality so you can test visibility of retail locations
  • You can learn how much people are actually reading messaging or just taking note of the messaging

Behavioural Science Measurement #IIeX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.  
How the classic fairy tale inspired the mobile ad strategy by Vuk Pavlovic, True Impact (Winner of Best New Speaker at #IIeX Europe)

  • What are good guys? Give to others, honest, helpful, kind, polite. What are bad guys? Uninvited, rude, inconsiderate, force their will, vain, self-serving. Which of these reflects your brand?
  • Brands need to humanize the customer and not treat them like eyeballs with a screen. The mobile environment is personal, their own social network, with their friends, in their bedroom. We need better relationships with brands that are this close to us. 
  • Ads need to be seen – attention, be relevant – receptivity, and be chosen.
  • They tested ads during games. The ads were presented only when they person actively stopped the game to get help.
  • Ads viewed during a more convenient time got more view time, more cognitive engagement
  • People ignore pop=up ads but they do pay attention to ads that play at a convenient time. These ads also perform better after the game is finished.
  • Ads viewed by choice get a 40 second view compared to 9 seconds for interrupting ads. Heatmaps show people are less likely to be looking for the X Close button
  • Annoying ads have more engagement and motivation because they are seeking the X Close button
  • Need to consider the person on the other end of the phone. Don’t force them to change the rotation of their phone. If their phone is vertical, then play the ad vertical.

How Home Depot is optimizing the shopper experience by Dan Braker (Brakethrough research) and Brendan Baby (Home Depot)

  • Inverted pyramid – customer sits at the top of the pyramid, front line associates, field support, corporate support, CEO
  • Use a blend of in store eye tracking, qualitative shop alongs, exit surveys, employee interviews and more to give nagivation behaviours, reasons for behaviours,, experience metrics, operational issues, concept screening
  • Asked shoppers on arrival at the store if they would do their shopping trip with eye tracking glasses. Measure area of interest, time in the area of interest, count of shoppers touching or holding a product, time touching or holding a product.
  • Path tracking watches the path they walked through the store, where do people spend much more or less time, is it due to interest or confusion
  • Can measure pupil dilation for engagement measures, can also measure voice pitch analysis if they talk or ask questions
  • Don’t overlook the employees in your research, they know how shoppers navigate, when shoppers need help
  • Need to use emerging and raditional approaches to maximize learnings
  • Changes to store elements should be thoroughly tested before roll out

Leveraging Artificial Intelligence to do Real-time fan research during NASCAR’s biggest race by Brooks Denton (NASCAR) and Andrew Konya (Remesh)

  • Time with friends, cooking and eating, arguments about strategy, social media, ad consumption all together equals the experience
  • Asked a set of questions throughout the race, like a live bulletin board, to collect qualitaive data. Choose a few responses that best reflect the full range of responses and match those with segments and demographics
  •  Build a distribution of opinion for each answer, create a consensus for each answer 
  • Sometimes they show the live responses to people answering the questions to increase engagement and other times they don’t show the other resposnses to maintain research rigour
  • Viewers want split screen commercials, the data proves this and now they can bring that data to the broadcast partners 

The automation of behavioural science by Aaron Reid (Sentient Decision Science)

  • Some associates are hard wired (attractive person, babies) or learned (police cars, spiders)
  • Can you differentiate fear of spiders and spiders using sweat in the hand, do you sweat more for one or the other
  • Automation is a major trend in survey design, push button question types and dashboard reporting, full study design is becoming automated, tracking analysis is automated, regression analysis can be automated [I really hope that a person monitors all of these things because humans creating data are not robots]
  • STICKY does eye tracking online not in the lab, it may not be great right now but we improve so quickly that it’s worth it to get in early
  • We need to automate the science so that cientists can wok on theory, discussion, ideas not button pushing. This gives us time to work on the importat parts. Gives you time to increase empathy for people and brands.

https://vimeo.com/207500225

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