Tag Archives: neuroscience

The Brains Behind Better Marketing: Using Neuroscience to diagnose and optimize marketing efforts, By Michael Smith, Nielsen Consumer Neuroscience

Live note taking at the November 10, 2016 webinar. Any errors are my own.

  • Consumer neuroscience is relative new, over the last decade
  • Think then feel, weighs pros and cons of product benefits and through rational optimization and then you think about some products being more valuable. This is completely backwards. Maybe we use emotions as a first gauge prior to coming to thinking decisions.
  • This is not new, Kahneman wrote about system 1 and system 2 which are thinking fast and thinking slow. Fast is intuition, automatic, and emotional. Slow is emotional, deliberate, and logical. Hare and turtle.
  • System 1 starts before system 2 is even on board.
  • Traditional consumer insights are market data, POS, panel, explicit data, focus groups and questionnaires. We also need implicit, non-conscious, and physiological reactions to get a more complete view of the consumer.
  • Tools include EEG, core biometrics, facial coding, eye tracking, self report
  • EEG – 32 sensors collect data 500 times per second to capture activity across the brain, can measure response to marketing materials
  • Biometrics – galvanic skin response/sweat, sensors on fingertips, heartrate
  • Facial expressions to show surprise, confusion, joy, sadness, cameras also show where eyes are looking at an ad or commercial
  • EEG trace has a lot of granularity, change it into a profile of activity over time, aggregate data over many people, can see high and low points, which scenes are high or low engaging [wish he’d talk about people not consumers]
  • Can measure memory activation, attention processing, and emotional motivation
  • Have 80 years of research on this so we know what is getting into memory, degree to which people are engaged in the communication, and intentional attention and processing
  • Biometrics give us momentary engagement, degree of arousal from the ad, emotional highpoint, does it grow over time or finish on a strong point, do they tune out before your branding occurs
  • Facial coding and expressed emotions, if there is no emotion the ad won’t be successful, impacts success of delivery, some ads are designed to create a specific emotion
  • People are drawn to the center of a stimulus and they naturally attend to faces, people want to look at people, but you might want people to look at your 1-800 number or your logo
  • Neuroscience tools are predictive of sales – neuro combined is the best, followed by EEG, biometrics, surveys, and lastly facial coding [of course, the best tool is always a combination of tools]
  • Case study – public service advertising – Cheerleader PSA, ad to encourage dad’s to be involved in their kid’s lives – Woman is upset about a crazy man dancing outside her window but then you see he is cheering with his daughter

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvNHCRFL17k

  • People liked the ad, 79% top 2 box
  • EEG and biometrics scored it high, lots of engagement, attention, engagement
  • There are peaks and valleys at various parts of the 30 second ad, at the lady scowling, seeing the cute little girl
  • Biometric trace shows a slow build, had a positive call to action
  • Put EEG, biometrics and facial coding together on one chart, kind of neat, negative expressed emotion at the beginning but becomes very positive at the end

eeg facial coding biometrics

  • Heatmap shows ‘attention vampires’ – people are looking at irrelevant things over the logo and phone number, it’s nice to look at the little girl but you need people to see your brand, maybe put the call in number to where people are looking and reduce the distractions when you show the important info
  • Neuro measures the non-conscious, ensures emotional connections exist, provides granular diagnostics
  • If you have norms, do you still need neuro? quant alone is only part of the answer
Advertisements

Nonconscious Impact Measurement #IIeX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own

The politics of emotion and reason by Aaron Reid

  • Some ads saw Bernie decrease his positives and Hillary decrease her negatives
  • During election years, people remember new products much less, it’s usually 60% but in those years it’s 30%; how do you touch people in those years – things like puppy monkey baby help 
  • 40 million online plays, 750 000 social actions, 6% of share of Super Bowl social ads, women less likely to like, millenial males loved it
  • How do you measure nonconscious associations – millisecond timing of swipes on a computer screen can be used
  • When implicit is added to measurements, social contagion correlations increase a lot from .3 to .6 has been seen
  • Implicit measures captures something unique
  • Predicting sales volumes of tables to cereal to soda, have seen r square go up to .9


An insights introspective: einstein’s definition of insanity and the future of consumer insight by Randy Adis and Andrew Baron

  • Problem solving requires new approaches, what should we be doing differently
  • Most companies are traditional market researchers or business contributors, only 10% are strategic insights or insights as so competitive advantage companies; we are still order takers
  • We used to have bigger teams and more funding but now smaller teams are asked to do more work
  • We used to get the time we needed and now everything is a fire
  • We used to have control over our funding but now MR reports to marketing and the CMO who determine our priorities 
  • Now we’re asked to know many kinds of research
  • Clients expect to do more data analytics, data integration, digital ad optimization, customer experience, path to purchase, digital focus groups
  • Small data is the new big data, big data train has been running for a while and we are losing touch with our consumers
  • Prediction without why means you are less likely to be able to repeat things
  • If you don’t like change, you’ll like irrelevance a lot less
  • Now we must be a scientist/sleuth, marketer who understands the problems, salesperson who can overcome inertia, champion/advocate to institutionalize something in an organization, strategist to help marketers figure out what to do with insights, brand steward
  • Humans are not fully conscious of their decisions, most often we think system 1 fast, law of least effort
  • People are accustomed to having an answer for thing seven if they don’t know the answer
  • Are you doing enough semiotics, ethnography, neuroscience (fmri, eeg), biometrics, predictive markets, implicit tests, metaphor elicitation – add a picture of a brain scan to anythign and believe ar Elmore likely to believe it


Future of advertising is the brain – why branded content’s success will be driven by neuroscience by Kevin Keane

  • 500 million people block mobile ads, 80% want to skip TV commercials, 80% mute online video
  • [my thoughts if anyone cares, if they put only one or two ads on a page I wouldn’t care. Bunches of videos flashing in my face like confetti R simply scream download an ad blocker]
  • Branded content is ready to take over
  • In 1860s wine companies sponsored theatre shows and stars
  • John Oliver went to town on native advertising recently {I’ll have to find that!}
  • Projected to grow to 25 billion in just a few years, hard to say where it is now or where it will be but it will be huge growth
  • More advertisers are turning into publishers
  • Content marketing is the only marketing left – Seth godin
  • Best branded content always provides value by understanding the user’s need and addresses those needs
  • Execution is a separate issue – can do meaningless content like Wayne’s World holding a Pepsi in front of his face or CocaCola on American Idol
  • The Achilles heel is measurement
  • Advertisers want to connect with consumers but need proof of that connection
  • Publishers need to grow audiences not alienate them and they need ad money
  • Consumers have near infinite amount of choice, competition for attention is fierce, hello facebook!
  • Enter neuroscience
  • Cools light wanted lots of brand on screen, TSN didn’t want so much bran on screen to be more authentic – what is the right way to do it
  • Best sports had the brand elements on screen, need to integrate the brand meaningfully, branded content outperformed, authentic stuff works a lot better
  • RBC did a 20 episode content where the didn’t reveal the brand until the 12th episode – double digit improvements
  • Brands were too nervous to move forward with a new paradigm without seeing neuroscience data


Strategic brand meaning management: aligning associations, metaphors and emotions for enduring brand relationships by Anders Bengtsson and Roberto Cymrot

  • We buy brands for what they mean not just waht they do
  • The worlds most successful brands manage brand meaning
  • CocaCola is moving to a single brand advertising for efficiencies, Coke Zero is ten years old and this could be risky for them to lose ads that are simply Coke Zero ads
  • Respondents need only a few minutes, can be done on mobile, pose a question like consider a person who drives this brand, select an image that describes that person, then ask people to describe the image and interpret the image
  • From it see emotions, personality traits, associations, attributes
  • Let’s them see functional attributes that trigger emotions
  • Can leverage the imagery in image clouds
  • Mercedes gets images of horse, golf clubs, mansions, a certain type of old money status, country club, classic people, established 
  • BMB gets mountain climbing, socializing, adventurous, roller coaster, a certain type of new money and a different type of person altogether – Bsuiness people, urban professional, young and successful, confidence entrepreneur 

Neuroscience and growing employee engagement with research #MRIA16 

Touch to sell: neuromarketing’s full toolkit to captivate the senses by Diana Lucaci

  • We need to bring more science into the boardroom
  • If I’d asked people what they wanted they would have said faster horses – we need to eliminate bias, eliminate response bias and social desirability
  • System 1 is when you slam on the brakes without thinking
  • We can measure using biometrics or neuroscience – facial expression, eye tracking, heart rate, skin response
  • There are consumer and medical versions of tools, like how a Fitbit is not a medical device
  • Biometrics are unidirectional – it could happen for any reason whether happy sad disgust or fear; this is why you combine with neuroscience
  • You can test physical media like postal boxes and also emails and scent and sound
  • What happens when you add scent to physical media and digital media
  • When you like what you’re looking at there’s more action in the frontal lobe
  • Cognitive load is lower for physical rather than digital
  • Unaided brand recall is better for physical
  • Physical is more persuasive and motivating 
  • Digital captures more attention based on time looking at things, but only because they’re trying to make sense of it which means it’s not as motivating or persuasive
  • Nothing compares to the instore experience, interacting with an item makes you more likely to purchase it
  • Need to make sure your storefront is noticed, eyes are drawn to faces particularly if the face is directly pointed to you, turn the face and people will look at other parts of the ad [how cool is that!]
  • Look at the CBC marketplace episode on retail tricks – how stores make you spend more
  • Decision fatigue is real
  • Sell to your tribe not to everyone
  • visual attention is automatic and quick
  • Humanize your customers and create mobile experiences that delight and add value to their lives


From survey to engagement – a journey of research and organization evaluation by Claude Andres and Amy Charles

  • Regularly get Canada’s top employer awards
  • Rely on data from employee survey to do this
  • Old program was “father knows best”, HR would tell everyone what to be happy about
  • Established a sample survey in 2006 and then redid a census survey in 2007 to include every ministry, 2009 added signifciant demographic data
  • How do you measure firefighters, swimming instructors, and policy analysts who are all employees
  • They need a common language but they need to talk to completely different kinds of people
  • Needed to work on data collection AND reporting
  • Reports used to show lots of numbers and metrics and they were boring [DATA IS NEVER BORING!  🙂 ]
  • Reports evolved into guidebooks supported by data portals
  • Broken window theory – if you break one window, lots of kids will keep doing it. Must stop it before it grows
  • Don’t make assumptions too quickly – surveys kept asking about fairness of hiring and people always said no. We think they don’t understand how boring works so let’s teach them what we do. But it turns out the more they knew the unhappier they got. But even people who got the job didn’t like the process.
  • Happy employees do not equal engaged employees
  • When the metric is the measure, you’re on a slippery slope. If you watch your speedometer so you don’t speed, you will get into an accident.
  • Can’t change compensation without getting input and informing ahead of time, people need to learn ahead of time and be given time to understand

Neuro to Big Data to Segmentation: Multi-mode wins #ESOMAR #MRX

esomarLive blogging from #ESOMAR Congress 2014 in Nice, France. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Car Clinics 3.0: Designing better cars by peering into the consumers brains by Fatima El-khatib, haystack International, Belgium, Ronny Pauwels, Toyota Motor Europe, Belgium, Wim Hamaekers, haystack International, Belgium

  • Something didn’t feel right about a car they were test driving, but they didn’t quite know what
  • How do you measure the unconscious? Combine qual quant and something new, neuromarketing
  • Customers don’t say what they do and they don’t do what they say. So why ask them everything.
  • Protypes were highly confidential so couldn’t use them. Had to use older available materials.
  • EEG captures long term engagement and relevance, based on avoidance and approach theory
  • Lab test showed computer generated images, 5 views of the exterior, 8 views of the interior, film was about 3 minutes
  • People liked the wheels of one vehicle but not much else. For the other vehicle, everything was fine and average.
  • Because of biometric results, focused on the specific positive and negative features
  • Verbal results shows little differences between the vehicles but EEG showed one vehicle had much more positive feelings. Could see the specific details that people were not able to express verbally.
  • What about asking people about the fabric and dashboard ornaments.
  • VW Polo and Hyundai ornaments performed well but Citroen and Peugeot 208 performed awful based on Galvanic Skin Response.
  • Consumers have difficulty expressing everything verbally. Overall engagement doesn’t matter, it’s all the individual elements that matter. Even the tiniest details of a car can have a huge effect.
  • Neuro is now an official tool for Toyota. They look at the same business questions from different angles. It helps to optimize the car development process.
  • Neuro is not the holy grail – multi-mode is the holy grail. You still need experimental research designs.
  • Be brave, be daring, use the new techniques and see if/which ones add value.

Communication Analytics: Effectiveness Research for Conversion Based Campaign Planning:  How to measure effects of (offline) campaigns on web visits sales and conversion by Erik Prins, Validators, Netherlands
Iris van Dam, Validators, Netherlands, Martin Leeflang, Validators, Netherlands, Sander Pot, Ticketveiling, Netherlands

  • “Moneyball” with Brad Pitt is all about big data. Baseball is all statistics. Used all the statistics to put together an unlikely team that came second place in the end. Cost per player was $250 000 when other teams paid 2.5 million per player.
  • Can we do money ball in a media campaign.
  • Can you correlate campaigns and web visitors, sales, and conversion. Of course. Can calculate cost per anything – media, shopper, clicks.
  • Know the media schedules by the minute, TV, radio, everything. Know all sales, new and old customers.
  • Import all this data into one platform. Calculate cost per mille – how much to reach one thousand people. Cost per sales, cost per shopper, cost per click.
  • Calculate how many people visited website after commercials over an entire year – It cost 0.25E to get someone to their website for one specific channel. Another channel ended up at 12E per customer.  The time of day matters, midday was so much cheaper.
  • Online is winning in Netherlands because they can measure views and clicks.
  • Outdoor advertising is activating existing customers. For new clients, you need TV and radio. Online media is more expensive
  • For Ticketveiling, the win it midday programming. Outdoor format was highway signs. Radio target was a few very specific channels.  Don’t burst all your funds at once, drip your funds is much cheaper.
  • There is less need for traditional research now, need to shift into research consulting, and clients understand this more.

New Perspectives: How a segmentation provided new ways of looking at consumers thereby unlocking sales potential by Alastair Liptrot, Simplot, Australia, Neale Cotton, The Lab Strategy & Planning, Australia, Paul Labagnara, The Lab Strategy & Planning, Australia, Peter Stuchberry, Nature Research, Australia

  • Start somewhere different if you want to end up somewhere different. Try starting at the end. How will you apply your research in the end?
  • Invest your money in a safe bank or lose it all at a casino. Or invest it in a segmentation [I much prefer the segmentation option 🙂 ]
  • Simplot is products in Australia in the freezer, to chiller, to house
  • Normally small packs, large packs, kiddie packs. Need to look beyond demographics
  • Most don’t have longevity or are only demo based, and may not complement existing tools or data.
  • Had to work with current categories and brands, as well as future brands.
  • developed four pillars – involvement – how much you love cooking 2) health 3) convenience 4) value
  • Decided on 8 segment model.
  • used Nielsen homescan – people who scan all their supermarket purchases. tagged everyone with a segment, used personality, demographics
  • Had to inspire the team to embrace the segmentation. Need to make the people feel a part of it, encourage acceptance and engagement. Had them engage from the very beginning. Include them in naming the segments so they truly understand what the segments are.  Created a game show for the marketing team to better understand the segments and how to use them.
  • Delivered 30 million in revenue for a $250000 investment
  • The project would have gone on the shelf if they hadn’t though about how they would use it in the end

Mind, Mood, Music, and Marketing by A.K. Pradeep (Great talk!) #CMACX #MRX

Live blogging from the MRIA/CMA #CMACX customer experience conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Opening Keynote: Mind, Mood, Music, And Marketing

Dr. A.K. Pradeep
Chairman, Nielsen NeuroFocus

CMA

  • He starts with just four slides. [so what has he got up his sleeve?]
  • Worst environment for the human brain is the retail store. Why is it so harsh for the brain? 100 million bits of information rush towards the brain, consciously we can process 40 bits. Brain uses 25% of body’s oxygen and it gets really tired trying to process all this information. The web store is no different.
  • The rule of 3 – 3 image groups and you’re done, too tired. ever been to a website that had only 3 image groups? never.
  • Turn off your preconceived notions of how retail stores ought to be. Forget what marketing school taught you.
  • “The most amazing creature on the planet – me”  [funny dude 🙂 ]
  • Attention – emotion – memory – are measured directly in the brain
  • Brain is programmed to seek novelty – even as we listen to this talk – is this new? is this new? is this new?
  • Any confusing experience will not be liked. Must be understandable.
  • Information – do i have enough information to decide. “category busting metric” – eg megapixels for cameras, for computers it’s gigahertz, nobody knows what it is but we know we need it, for cola it’s zero calories, what is it for YOUR product, if you don’t have one, your brain will create one called “Price.”
  • Interaction – in an apple store, can you play with every product and every piece of software? yes! In Best Buy, most products are locked up, you can’t interact with them. In your product category, is there any interaction you can give your consumer? Interaction is critical especially for female shoppers. Women shop, men buy. Women are experience seekers. Men are transaction seekers. Purchase journey is cliche and boring. [DAMN RIGHT. and it’s wrong.] This journey does not exist.
  • Entertainment – Entertain me in the aisle. Does this audience want to see pictures of brains? We want information but we want to be shamelessly entertained. It’s ok. Am I entertaining the consumer at the point of purchase online. Southwest airlines tells you a joke. Apple Store employees all look like funny geeks. Don’t be wrapped up your boring self. You’re not saving the planet. You’re selling stuff.
  • Education – Brains crave one new fact.  Did you know the brain uses 25% of the brains energy? It is a reward mechanism, dopamine.  Little facts are dopamine squirters.  This is why people share stupid facts all day on social media.
  • Simplicity – This is the most complicated concept. Rule of 3 applies here too. Before, during, after. Past, present, future. Always divide things into threes. 3 types of gatorade, 3 types of skin cleanser. Create subbrands that dovetail and fit in with consumer experience. Images on the left, words on the right. Left visual field is processed by right brain and vice versa. If you don’t put images on the proper side, the brain has to take an extra step and shift it over to the correct side and this takes more brain energy. Babies look at faces 400 times, want to engage with your face. Why do ads show people looking out into the distance? It makes us take an extra step in the brain for processing. Pet food makers put puppies and owners on the food bag. BUT, humans have to touch animals, want to touch the damn dog! This is frustrating for the brain. Female brains read everything, men just look at the pictures. Women use 20 000 words a day, men 7000 words including grunts and groans. [He’s being funny. again. 🙂 ]  Men need visual. Women need words.
  • Satisfaction – “Hand feel”  Homunculus – every part of the body has a part in the brain. Your palms and your lips take up 60% of your brain power. Coke tastest better from a bottle than a can. The shape of the bottle creates sensations in your palms much more than the generic shape of a can. Can I taste a cookie through the package? Can you make my brain fire before I experience your product? [scratch and sniff cookie package!  🙂 ]  Do you peel the label off of bottles? You are creating stimulation for your brain. I.e., if people are peeling packages while you’re talking, you are BORING!  Customer experience is painting a masterpiece. You can’t just paint a gorgeous face, every step counts.
  • Self-Worth – Sales people always say you look amazing when you try on new clothes. We know they’re lying. But we like it. We want it even though it’s not true.  Every time your consumer has an experience with you, how have you made them feel better about themselves? What about when they ask you at the checkout counter by asking “Would you like to donate $1 to save a child”? No, they lowered your self esteem because now you feel horrible about not donating. Payment=Pain. There is brain proof of this. The only things that mitigates this is an act of charity at the point of payment. A coupon that says a donation will be made if you use this, mitigates the pain of payment.  Even if it’s only 10 cents. “Thank you for buying all this beer, we will now donate 10 cents on your behalf.” We miss out on linking acts of charity to create a superlative consumer experience. Including a charitable act in the payment process reduces the pain, boosts self-esteem. Put a mirror at your new products. People will look in it, be happy with themselves, creates halo effect of products around it. If you argue with your significant other, argue in front of the mirror. You can’t be mad in front of a mirror. Put mirrors in your complaint center. Get the best performance review ever by putting a mirror behind you while your boss talks to you. Make people happy by increasing the weight of the package and make it shiny – heavy is more valuable. Put CDs in a big box with a heavy manual. Wear shiny clothes.
  • Community – People want to belong.
  • You can’t pick one of these and expect to get all of them. You can’t do some mediocre. It is not an a la cart menu.
  • We solved a 2000 year old puzzle. What are the precise emotions evoked by music? Specific music by category by brand by time of day in the aisle or by ad creates neurological context.
  • Music is the non-conscious part of the brain 95% of decision making is non-conscious. Medical study – one group chose music to listen to, the other group had no music during the surgery. Recovery rates were higher for those who heard the music. Interesting – both groups of people were anesthetized during the surgery and therefore didn’t hear the music – unknown mechanisms are processing the music during non-conscious periods. This is specialized by culture, geography. We can layout what emotions are elicited second by second.
  • What if consumers hear music in the aisle that elicits the emotion the brand wants? Right now, no one knows how to pick a good song, or the good part of the song.
  • “Call tune” – I’m running late so when I call home to tell them, there’s music in the background to calm them down and keep them from getting angry. How about using the right calming music when people are on hold?
  • [Great speaker! If you need a key-note, look no further!]

 

Other Posts

Neuroscience Scalable Marketing Solutions by Charles Spence #ACEI_CO #InvestigAction2013 #MRX

… Live blogging from the Colombian Association for Marketing and Public Opinion Research in Bogota, Colombia, any errors are my own, any comments in [] are my own…

ACEI Bogoto Colombia

Para leer esto en español, por favor, copie pegarlo en Google. Una mala traducción es mejor que ninguna traducción.  http://translate.google.com

  • successful new products appeal on both rational and emotional levels to as many senses as possible
  • how do you engage a tv in more than audio visual senses?  about opening the box has an olfactory experience as well, perhaps consider a branded smell [what the!?]
  • McGurk effect – visual illusion where looking at a person talking makes your brain interpret what you hear, you think you see them saying a certain sound but you don’t
  • the music you hear in a store affects the products you purchase – french music creates french wine purchases, ditto for german music and german wine. but people refuse to believe the music had any influence on their choice.
  • what do marketers do if the consumer doesn’t know why they make their decisions?
  • changing the fragrance of a shampoo makes people think the shampoo works better
  • where is the “buy” button in the brain?
  • fMRI is popular because it is colourful, lying in a scanner while a deafeningly loud machine watches you drink a beverage is not real  [HA HA!]
  • physiological measures becoming more popular – microexpressions, skin response, heart rate, pupil dilation, eye movements – these are challenging for real world applications
  • a manly shape to a bottle implies the product is strong, eg a squarish bottle versus one that is thinner at the middle
  • for every $2 increase in the price of a bottle of wine, the weight of the bottle increases by 8 grams, price doesn’t tell you which wine is better but which wine has a heavier bottle; even stronger for a tube of lipstick
  • perhaps make your packaging feel heavier even if you’re losing less packaging
  • the sound of chips crunching defines how we think they taste, how fresh we think they are – P&G wanted to know how they should change the sound of their chips
  • pens click when you open them, touching fabric creates a sound, spraying something creates a sound, some things should feel AND sound soft
  • restaurants can include the sounds and smells and sights relevant to the product, one restaurant even provides a headset for you to listen to while you eat and people perceive this food to taste better
  • a brain seeing a red drink or a blue drink decides on the flavour, the sweetness, and this differs by culture. A blue drink might make you think raspberry, mint, or mouthwash.
  • if you put chips in the wrong package, people are either confused or taste the flavour that it says on the bag
  • is it the plate or is it the food? the size and colour of the plate changes your experience of the food.
  • test the perceptions of different food colours by using augmented reality headsets that change the appearance of the colour for you
  • eye monitoring tells you where people look at a package – at the words, the pictures, the price?
  • putting your brand name on the narrow section of a bottle of shampoo means people are more likely to see the name – people always look at the narrow section first
  • new trend sweeping the UK is synaesthetic marketing – people who unconsciously associate a color or shape with a number or letter [Olive Sacks writes about this, really neat case studies]
  • most people do associate shapes and speech sounds – round shapes are soft letters, sharp shapes are angular letters. use these round and angular letters to describe your product.

BP Shopper Insights Neurometric Case Study #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats! This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

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2:15 – Engaging Fuel Consumers at the Street & the Pump: BP

Pay-at-the-pump gasoline pump in Indiana, Unit...

Image via Wikipedia

Shopper Insights Neurometric Case Study
EmSense and BP

  • 10000 British Petroleum gas stations and over 2 million consumers every day [BP is a great social media data quality case study – BP=blood pressure, basis points, brad pitt]
  • How do consumers interact with the gas station and visual elements. focus of what people do not what people say. [actions always speak louder than words]
  • What do people notice when they’re looking at gas stations as they drive down the street?
  • Recruited people once they arrived at the gas station so they could monitor the entire pumping experience. Needed equipment that function under varying degrees of naturalsunlight, uncontrolled lighting. Had to be able to move around.
  • Interested in cognition and emotion – easy/difficult/thinking vs like/hate [finally some methodology!]
  • Recruited several hundred people over 2 weeks. Took 20 minutes to complete each person’s gas pumping experience. Had to choose representative pumps because all the pumps are different.
  • Where do they while they pump? Right at the pump. Not at other cars. Not at the signage across the way. Pumps are quite tall and signs on top of the pump are out of site and people don’t look there. They look immediately around the price section of the pump.
  • Now a Drive-In study where you can’t hook people up with equipment. Apparently lawyers don’t like that. 🙂
  • What do drivers notice on approach? They showed videos of people approaching gas stations. Once they pass the station, people don’t think about that station anymore. Canopy tops are noted. Amenities are noticed. Price is noted. “Light approaches” are  missed [I don’t know what that is.]
  • Had people drive in to the station.  Did they noticeanything? The more cluttered pump caused confusion. The less busy pump was more enjoyable. Consumer ratings confirmed those results. Consumers want a clean station.
  • [Love how the new methods validate existing methods and identify parts where we thought wrong. See? One method does not fit all. And, one method’s results should not transfer identically.]

Ginsberg: Neuro-Based Research, Intel #MRA_AC #MRX

Intel Corporation

Image via Wikipedia

Session summary of the Marketing Research Association 2011 annual conference. These are my interpretations of the session. They were written during the session and posted immediately afterwards. Any inaccuracies and silliness are my own.


General Session: What They’re Thinking, But Can’t Say: Moving to Deeper Insights With Neuro-Based Research
David Ginsberg, Intel

  • We have a desire to appear rational, we focus on facts and numbers, we develop 20 point plans. Why doesn’t the audience see things as we do? Science tells us that’s not how people think, that’s now how they make decisions.
  • Intel wanted to become champions of the MIND of the consumer, not the voice. Move from rational to the emotional.
  • “We have learned more about the brain in the last 5 years than all of human history combined.” Charlie Rose
  • Traditional – Conscious brain is CEO, conscious brain keeps irrational in check, conscious brain knows why it did that
  • New learnings – Unconscious is responsible for most decisions, unconscious is not rational, conscious brain enters story afterwards (this is not new at all unless new means since the 1800s) Do you KNOW why you really truly love your spouse? Do you have access to this information? Maybe not.
  • 5% of brain’s processing is conscious which means 95% is non-conscious. Why do we focus on the 5% so much? We take in 11 million bits of information per minute but our brain processes only 40 bits per minute. Yes, 40.  Cocktail party, hum of people talking, but then you hear your name in another conversation and you instantly recognize it even though you weren’t paying attention to it.
  • What has neuroscience replaced? Nothing. It’s all additive. 20% of budget is on neuroscience approaches.
  • The process is this: Sense data in world, store patterns as memories, determine if it is expected and reinforce that memory, if it’s unexpected it tries to connect it to memories it does expect, (A convertible is a car with no hat), if it can’t connect it may just discard the memory,  after a couple times it may make its way into memory, brain decides if it needs to take an action,
  • Brain seeks to economize conscious computing, takes a lot of power, offload as much as possible to unconscious, inherent biases like loss aversion (need to win a lot more than we lose), limits on conscious processing power means the decision has to be structured to reduce the computational load
  • How did experts versus regular people rate jam?  People matched with the experts when they just ordered them by liking. But when people had to explain WHY they liked them, the decisions were completely different. Brain wiring was messed up.
  • People prefer things on the right side of a table, at the end of the list.  People have great answers for choosing that. In a test of 4 kinds of pantyhose, people had a preference even though the 4 options were identical in all ways. People are not equipped to answer the questions we ask them.
  • Can use cognitive psychology, neurological based, facial coding research methods for product research, branding research, and ad testing.
  • People say they want speed performance out of Intel chip. But if that was true, we wouldn’t need a marketing department. Actually, people say they want the pretty red laptop not “Intel inside”. They used trained psychotherapists to work with people. They got into real deep emotions about what performance means to people, it was like conducting real psychotherapy sessions.
  • They tested five brand positioning statements with asking a single question. They introduced no bias by prompting people. They asked people to match words to the position and new words that they had never thought of before appeared. They loved not having to ask a question. Often, you can’t give the real answer.
  • (insert yellow slide with green text, and yellow slide with yellow text here)   J
  • Not everything has been validated yet (I don’t need validation. Tons of psychology research backs this stuff up.)
  • Don’t be encumbered by history. Go off and do something wonderful. Robert Noyce.

I’m a Lion in the Market Research Zoo #MRX

It’s a zoo in the market research world! Everyone has their own way of dealing with all the changes in our fair industry. So which animal best reflects who you are?

Dinosaurs – You started out doing paper surveys 30 years ago and you’re still doing them. You don’t have a computer, you don’t know what Facebook is, and the only blog you’ve ever read was the little red book with the quickly pickable lock under your daughter’s bed. Did someone print this out for you?

Ostriches – You have your head deeply buried in the sand. You’ve been doing survey research since you started working in the industry and you know there are lots of new methods and options out there. But, it’s scary and you don’t want to hear about it. Ever. Go away.

Sloths – You’ve heard what’s out there and have an idea of what is ahead for market researchers. But you’ve got other things to think about, like is the banana in your lunch totally bruised. You’ll stick with online surveys until someone shoves something else in front of you that you can’t get around. Unlike the laundry piled around your bed.

Turtles – You are slow and steady. You see all the cool things that have become available to market researchers in the last few years and are gradually making your way there. It’s a slow and steady walk but you need to make sure it’s the right move. Wow. You sounds kinda boring.

Lions – You’ve seen your target, realized you need it to fill out your diet, and have moved in for the kill. You devour new methods and opportunities without any fear. You sometimes cause fear in other and your lucky number is 37.

Nuthatches – You fly haphazardly all over the place from one new thing to another. Gaming! Online surveys! Co-creation! Mobile surveys! Social media research! Neuroscience! You’ve seen it! You’ve done it! You’re an expert in everything! But really an expert in nothing.

So which one are you?

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