Tag Archives: qualitative

Unilever research start-up showcase #IIeX #MRX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in Amsterdam. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

The showcase is a collection of small companies used by Unilever.

Get smart: Community your research with Twice the Impact at half the cost by Paul Field, TouchCast

  • What is touchcasting
  • [Speaker is now projecting himsel onto his slides using a green screen]
  • Its the next best thing to being in a room with someone, use this to communicate with employees around the world
  • [he’s choosing video from his screen and has removed himself from the big screen]
  • Use for training, meetings, presentations
  • Can use different backgrounds, put yourself in google maps, use a TelePrompTer on the screen, and this draws teh speakers eyes to the right place on the ipad
  • Can use multiple camera angles by using an ipad and some iphones
  • Can adjust the lighting yourself on the screen, can use filters like Instagram, can put titles on the screen
  • Automatically creates multiple clips and then you can edit out your stumbles or miscues
  • Unilever uses this because it lets you place content inside a presentation, video apps, documents, spreadsheets, polls, surveys, live social content, webpages, multiple videos can be shown at once
  • Can be viewed on any device, tablet, phone, computer, you just need a modern browser
  • It’s a container for long form content

Qualitative research at quantitative scale by Tugce Bulut, Streetbees

  • What do people say, see, and do when you aren’t there
  • Do you go deep and small in scale and lack statistical accuracy? Many start small and qual and then go large and quant
  • Don use surveys or panels, they use an app that anyone can download [isn’t that just a new kind of panel?]
  • Request people to video a task the next time they do it – the laundry, the cooking
  • You can google pictures on google but it wont be quite what you want, won’t be specific to your question
  • They don’t put people in a room, a focus group, and interview. They have them engage during the usual task whether in a cafe or at home
  • Ask people to log everything time they do something, a quick photo of the food or the situation, what emotion, what drivers, chat choices, snacks and meals are blurring
  • Verify people with technology from native language speakers in the country, photos and videos are verified as real [by a researcher type of person not by traditional validation]
  • Transcribe, translate, observations via machine learning
  • You can recontact people based on their contributions
  • They graduate people after two years and then people can’t provide consumer opinion anymore, they become retail experts [this is an excellent idea. Traditional panels should take note.]

Cracking the code: researching, understanding, and engaging consumers at the base of the pyramid by Melanie Edwards, Mobile Metrix

  • Majority of the planet is low income, they lack the basics in quality of water, food, housing, education, many deal with safety issues that researchers cannot overcome
  • You can train young people within the communities to use handheld devices to do interviews, high quality data and they get information, products and services in return
  • Unilever got huge surge in brand awareness, revamped their marketing messages, restructured distribution; communities increased their use in hand washing and increase in water treatment frequency
  • In another project, they were able to correct the govts illness incidence rate which was four times higher than thought; realized they needed to use different words to describe the product because people didn’t understand the word
  • This model creates work in unemployed areas, facilitates one on one conversation to create change
  • Have done research in the USA as well, poor area where one third are obese, 14% have diabetes, and one third live under poverty line, highest morbidly rate in the area = we have emerging markets in our own backyard
  • Could we increase their use of vegetables, where do they buy groceries
  • Keeping research within the community increases response rates and engagement – locals talk to locals, builds trust and credibility, fosters opennes and deeper insights
  • Creates a customer feedback loop, gives access to essential quality products and doorstep education [we need to build this into all the work we do, research for the greater good not just the greater buck]

Driving insights into ideas: creative leadership and the way of Elvis by Chris Barez-Brown, Upping your Elvis

  • Find a partner and tell them something you are deeply passionate about [live demo after a brief sing. Now give that person a big hug.Yeah, don’t do this if you have a short shirt on. :)]
  • “Who is Elvis” around here – who here is a brand, a maverick, breaks the rules [ha! Interesting concept!]
  • We all have a bit of Elvis in us and business need this Elvis 
  • Help to drive a culture change, to deliver more ideas and partner better to make change happen
  • You can’t think yourself to get ten out of ten, you need to take a creative leap
  • You need to be more confident, bring passion, bring more of yourself
  • Find the people who can impact colleagues on a day to day level
  • People will always try to make you be more professional, be more of what other people want you to be, socialize to norms, emulate the leaders, lose touch with your unique and specialness
  • Where do you have your best ideas [when i go for afternoon walks to take a break from work]
  • Best ideas come when we realize or when we have fun
  • People are good with the thinking part but less so the feeling part, people often do 80 percent thinking and twenty percent feeling for personal decisions but it’s more fifty fifty for business decisions
  • Do you do the same thing every single day? That’s not insightful, need to adjust as appropriate
  • [now instructed to make the best paper airplane you’ve ever made, people ripping out paper now}
  • Would you change your design the next time? [everyone says yes] We just make it real and do it everyday and thenwe apply   what we learned to the next time.

  • We spend much of our lives on auto-pilot, same route to work every day, same dish at the restaurant every time, same side of the bed every time, we are creatures of habit and auto-pilot kicks in, not attuned to the uniqueness of the situation
  • Need to learn how to wake up, need to have a clear intention for it

Co-creation : active participation predicts future needs by Alex Arrigo, MindSumo

  • Participation within TV shows is very different – family feud slogan is survey says and people try to predict answers of a random crowd, participates one way, it’s transactional, nothing matches among episodes, people give out nouns
  • Whose line it is anyways – contestants interact with each other, create experience real time, topics may return in later parts of the show, its songs and action as and dance
  • Hard to co-create with a mob, communities are good for a insights, but active creatives are even better
  • Active creators are hard to identify
  • Participation depends on the channel, the time, and need to be aware of this when you use it for predictive purposes
  • Worlds first fully automated restaurant “Eatsa” everything is done by robots and self service, people took a survey and got a free lunch there, focus group of food and preferences, vegan or gluten intolerant, got invited back numerous times and were talking about dining expectations and technology not just type of food you like
  • Needs are verbs
  • Participation is a spectrum, mobs or community or active creations
  • Co-creation looks tot he future – needs are verbs, projects needs through participation
  • You’re already two thirds complete – existing community and research is foundation, engage creators next, fin a project, understand what works
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Social media and qualitative – Respect the word! #MRIA16 #NewMR 

Ask first, listen later by Lori Reiser

  • Traditional research often starts with the business, product iterations, product marketing, product fine tuning
  • We should put people first so you hear about unmet needs and pain points
  • Case studies
  • Health insurance firm – young adults getting their first insurance plan, and new retirees moving away from employer benefits; had predefined assumptions but those were based on the six people in the room, fears of these people were financial and health and being bored not really insurance, how did they define good health and how could that be protected, did focus groups and bulletin boards, retirees weren’t worried about getting sick but rather that their parents would get sick, younger people were more worried about stress as their health issue
  • Meat company – what did consumers need in terms of communication needs, saved qualitative for the end of the research, started with a survey of staff members and inspection organizations, realized they needed to formalize their email address to clients so that it didn’t come from Annie Pettit but rather from the company, realized that Mennonite members didn’t have email addresses [pay attention to that anyone who says they do probability sampling via RDD]
  • Pharmacist – surveyed pharmacists as well as focus groups and the focus groups were after the fact, what does patient centered care mean, many barriers in terms of how pharmacists communicate with people given what doctors and other people want them to be able to say
  • You can’t ask broad questions unless you go qualitative, open ends on a survey arne’t going to cut it; give your users permission to participat in the idea making, find the trendsetters and listen to them, use skilled moderation

Classified: Research that integrates to innovate by Mark Wood

  • Technology has given us an identify crisis, people challenge are traditional beliefs, anyone can do DIY research, other people are jumping into our sandbox with new types of data
  • Tactics to get our mojo back
  • Understand consumer dynamics in a more connected world
  • Leverage expertise in a data curation to improve SML capabilities, Think both/and between traditional survey and SM, Help companies navigate path to purchase, use data to help action
  • Have to work with clients better and bring in other pieces of data so we can inform them better
  • Bringing MR expertise into social media listening
  • We need to take SM data to the full extent just not report facts and figures
  • Must get access to this data first and then we can sample and structure and clean it
  • SM provides an authentic voice of the consumer, has rich detail; surveys enhance social media structure to categorize themes and related back to real initiatives 
  • Use social and survey together to inform each other
  • Need to identify lots of buzz with lots of impact, not just lots of buzz
  • Use buzz impact matrix to understand which conversations have high buzz, high impact, and then dive deeper into those issues
  • Identify all the touch points that need to be assessed, identify which have the highest reach, but there are big differences in claimed versus reality
  • Need to move from measurement to action [the problem of the century!]
  • Opportunities are greater than ever for MR to have an impact

Analysis, design, and sampling methods #PAPOR #MRX 

Live blogged at #PAPOR in San Francisco. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Enhancing the use of Qualitative Research to Understand Public Opinion, Paul J. Lavrakas, Independent Consultant; Margaret R. Roller, Roller Research

  • thinks research has become to quantitative because qual is typically not as rigorous but this should and can change
  • public opinion in not a number generated from polls, polls are imperfect and limited
  • aapor has lost sight of this [you’re a brave person to say this! very glad to hear it at a conference]
  • we need more balance, we aren’t a survey research organization, we are a public opinion organization, our conference programs are extremely biased quantitative
  • there should be criteria to judge the trustworthyness of research – was it fit for purpose
  • credible, transferable, dependability, confirmability
  • all qual resaerch should be credible, analyzable, transparent, useful
  • credible – sample repreentation and data collection
  • do qual researchers seriously consider non-response bias?
  • credibility – scope deals with coverage design and nonresponse, data gathering – information obtained, researcher effects, participant effects
  • analyzability – intercoder reliability, transcription quaity
  • transparency – thick descriptions of details in final documents

Comparisons of Fully Balanced, Minimally Balanced, and Unbalanced Rating Scales, Mingnan Liu, Sarah Cho, and Noble Kuriakose, SurveyMonkey

  • there are many ways to ask the same question
  • is it a good time or a bad time? – fully balanced
  • is it a good time or not? – minimally balanced
  • do you or do you not think it is getting better?
  • are things headed in the right direction?
  • [my preference – avoid introducing any balancing in the question, only put it in the answer. For instance: What do you think about buying  a house? Good time, Bad time]
  • results – effect sizes are very small, no differences between the groups
  • in many different questions tested, there was no difference in the formats

Conflicting Thoughts: The Effect of Information on Support for an Increase in the Federal Minimum Wage Level, Joshua Cooper & Alejandra Gimenez, Brigham Young University, First Place Student Paper Competition Winner

  • Used paper surveys for the experiment, 13000 respondents, 25 forms
  • Would you favor or oppose raising the minimum wage.
  • Some were told how many people would increase their income, some were told how many jobs would be lost, some were told both
  • Negative info opposed a wage increase, positive info in favor of wage increase, people who were told both opposed a wage increase
  • independents were more likely to say don’t know
  • negatively strongly outweighs the good across all types of respondents regardless of gnder, income, religion, partyID
  • jobs matter, more than anything

Cultural revelations #ESOMAR #MRX 

Leveraging qualitative for indiginous innovations: flavour innovations  by Irene Joshy

  • How do i adapt the flavours of the local palette? can i copy paste? is the flavour appealing and authentic? how do i position the brand or variant? need to deconstruct and reconstruct a product
  • India has two major brands in the category – lays which is global and kurkure
  • pepsi wanted a flavour map of indea, map the flavours and create flavour groups that work across india as well as strong regional flavours
  • identify the semiotics, embedded and emergent codes of the flavours in the context of snacking
  • wanted a shortlist to test out
  • india has 32 regions, 125 dishes, 75 snacks – how do we decontruct this qualitatively
  • every dish has a role – staples, accompaniement
  • started by mapping flavours
  • started with recipes and ingredients, created and mapped clusters – cook books and online receipts, chefs, home cooks, looked for ‘lost in time’ recipes, used snowballing to find grandmothers known in their areas as great cooks and created recipes from their cooking
  • got a list of ingredients and links of strength among every ingredient, created clusters of flavours
  • client didn’t know what to do with the results [seriously? you need someone to tell you? sigh]
  • clusters allowed them to figure out what went with wheat or lentil or potato or rice
  • they could choose a base and then the flavour cluster that worked with it and then experiment by adding something fom a different cluster
  • created three test products
  • look at visual , olfactory, mouth feel, throat feel, overall impression
  • gave consumers metaphors to choose from because they don’t have the words needed to describe their feelings
  • first prorotype – flavor and emotion, tactile and emotion, colour and emotion
  • is it a type of food that it playful, sensual, rebellious, celebratry, subtle, comfort
  • the study was viewed as a map for the next five years
  • [very interesting talk, i’d recommend finding the paper]

  
   
Irish cities uncovered by Guy Perrem and Sheila Cunningham

  • huge battle for market share in the been category [really? i’ve not seen a single root beer since i got here!]
  • ireland is 4.5 million, dublin is 1.2 million, is it really four main cities or just one city
  • city dwellers have more income
  • city is freedom and opportunity, each city has its own nuance
  • tested several different heineken brands – Tiger, Sol, Desperados, heineken
  • Cork, dublin, galways, belfast were tested
  • had to avoid the stereotype, had to ask about culture without talking about culture, had to let personal experiences emerge naturally, had to have practical use when the research was done
  • mediography – inventory of social engagement, bricks and mortor, entertainment
  • talked to trend creators – influences, experts, food, fashion, music, art, opportunities for thir party involvement
  • cultural brailing – essays on throughs and feeling on culture ingredients, required to take a broad perspective not just going to get a beer
  • digital ethnography – looked at people in action, in interactions, in real time through out the city
  • creative consumer workshops – went through all the content they collected, and asked people create ideas for brands and events, marketing could watch this happen
  • Dublin – cosmopolitcal, diversity, opportunity
  • Galway – laid back, wildness, embracing
  • belfast – freedom, optimism, fragility
  • cork – pride, traditional, banter
  • Truth 1 – dublin is humble about its place in the world, loves to see itself as connected and a contemporty of other cities of interest. led to a music plaform – brought the cities of the world to dublin. “heineken sound atlas” Brooklyn an dtokyo have been featured
  • Truth 2- belfast is a freedom and where some places were once closed off, jailhouse and courthouse underground connection was of huge interest but unavailable. They created an event in this area. Drove word of mouth.
  • Truth 3 – want to be familiar in dublin but also show off new discoveries. “Open your dublin” which meant to go discover your city. Dine in the dark was dinner in a crypt of a cathedral they thought they already knew.
  • Truth 4 – feel dublin is creative but it needs support to really see that. you can sponsor an event as long as you respect the location. Sponsored the Tiger Fringe Festival with daring creatives.
  • brands grew by 50% or more
  • moved from mass marketing to localized decision making

Empathy, VOC, MROCs, and digital qual presentation summaries #IIeX

Live blogged from IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.


The surprising power of empathy to foster consumer engagement by Sion Agami and Steve August   

  • innovation is normally thought of as new tech, new methods, new products. in reality, that’s only the final output of innovation. innovation is really a cumulative work of bringing something to bear.
  • the key to understanding people is empathy [GENUINE empathy, not company mandated empathy]
  • understanding is a stigmatized condition – consumers may feel ashamed or embarrassed or scared to buy a product
  • 1 in 3 adult women experience incontinence and it increase to 1 in 2 for the older group
  • digital qual allows you to get in the moment – when do you have women discuss things privately versus together in a group – both have important uses
  • women experienced the five stages of grief as they expected their own incontinence, they wouldnt go out unless they knew where all the bathrooms were so they were always planning, couldn’t be spontaneous, worried other people would notice they were wearing something, some women kept two of each outfit so they could change and no one would notice, overplanning kills the magic
  • is digital appropriate for the older community? absolutely. they use the technology to learn about this, they use mobile apps to find bathrooms, find the best bathrooms
  • people didn’t feel like it was a survey, they felt like a community, somewhere they could talk to other people who knew what they were going through, it felt like therapy to some
  • women want a functional design that allows them to reclaim femininity, it can’t feel like a diaper
  • digital qual’s ultimate deliverable is empathy

Capturing the voice of the customer in a multichannel world by Holly DeMuro 

  • is voice of the consumer part of market research? [is that a rhetorical question?]
  • consider quick wins vs sustainable growth, need to improve the organization at a higher level
  • if you don’t act on the research, it’s a fail

Closer, Deeper, and Better Insights by Rebecca West 

  • mobile has surpassed desktop in search
  • how do consumers navigate apps and websites with their mobile devices
  • taking a picture of someone using a phone isn’t helpful, image is too small, instead need to capture online activity in real time
  • a usability platform can display the mobile device screen on your computer so you can watch

Co-ownership of insights: mapping the consumer journey for Breyers ice cream by Niels Schillewaert and Daniel Blatt 

  • Todays discussion is about ice cream [WHERE ARE THE SAMPLES!?]
  • People do NOT need this product but it brings about happiness
  • You could do a shop along or ethnography or eye tracking but what is the right approach for this study
  • people are only a shopper for a very small portion of the day, the rest of the time they are human
  • research is often a one way presentation, wanted to increase the shelf life of the results with audio visual
  • invited Breyers loyals to blind research and revealed midway, 3 weeks long
  • people become really involved with the online community and asked about each others kids
  • responders were thankful to be a part of it, felt like their whole family participated in it too
  • 20% less drop out, somewhat due to product category, 2800 pictures, 40 videos, hard to achieve in a focus group, $75 dollar incentive and they had to save their ice cream receipts
  • rational benefit to ice cream is that it makes you feel good but you still don’t need it
  • learned about the entire family not just the shopper

If math is hard, you can always do qualitative research #MRX 

Yup, I heard that from a speaker on stage at the recent AAPOR conference. You see, because if you’re smart, then you’re probably doing quantitative research. Because quant is for smart people and qual is for dumb people. Because qual requires no skills, or at least the skills are basic enough for non-mathematical people to muddle through. Because qual isn’t really a valid type of research. Because nonprobability research is worthless (yup, I heard that too).

Perhaps I’ve taken the statement out of context or misrepresented the speaker. Perhaps. But that’s no excuse. Qual and quant both require smart people to be carefully trained in their respective methods. Each research method is appropriate and essential given the right research objective. 

The marketing research industry has improved greatly in this pointless debate of whose method is better and right. (Neither) Now it’s time for the polling industry to do the same. 

Interviewing for the Edit by Michael Carlon, Hall & Partners and Joe Indusi, RESEARCH2VIDEO #CRC2014 #MRX

CRC_brochure2013Live blogging from the Corporate Researchers Conference in Chicago. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Interviewing for the Edit by Michael Carlon, Hall & PartnersJoe Indusi, RESEARCH2VIDEO

  • why is high quality video important – people always remember the videos more so than reports
  • PATIENCE is your friend. we’re trained to probe and fill the silence, we’re uncomfortable with silence. when someone asks WHY all the time, it interrupts the sound bite. HIt the mute button. 3 second rule. think of soundbites during the interview – wait 3 seconds. this lets the editor cut the clip and it leaves room for the person to keep talking. the first answer is usually the answer they think you want to hear but if you wait 3 seconds then they come up with the real answer.
  • Stay out of the LIGHT.  The poltergeist rule. Let the responder have the light. Don’t film in front of windows or it looks like you’re in the witness protection program. You can only use footage if you can see the face of the person talking. It’s important to show their environment, show what represents them, show where they usually sit in their favourite chair. Don’t put them against a blank wall that you could find anywhere. show their character.
  • It’s okay to beat a deadhorse – you do know what’s going on after a few questions or interviews. But then you’re looking for consistency and reliable. and it gives you multiple editing takes in cases where there was a cough or a baby crying in the background. You can ask people to repeat what they said, “we’d like to hear you say that again.” Maybe they’ll say it a little differently or not but it’s okay to ask.
  • Cutaways – don’t forget the B side. if people mention behaviours, keep track of them so you can show them during the filmed interview. it doesn’t need to be just a person talking, show little clips while they’re talking.
  • Consider screening out pet owners – particularly if you know footage will be used, we don’t love your pets all the time, you can’t get footage out of a video full of barking. bring a lint brush 🙂
  • Capture establishing shots – communicate without having to say it, take footage of the neighbourhood.
  • Interview 3 to 5 consumers per segment – one will be a dud or they have dogs or cats, allows you to show multiple people saying the same thing, you can’t have a montage of one. helps sell an idea.
  • Budget for time-coded transcriptions – do this even for tight budgets, it lets you not take notes and be fully involved, it’s easier to highlight quotes on paper and then show these to the film editor
  • Insist on a video script – think about how the edits will come together, if the filmer can see the script ahead of time, then can plan ahead
  • Work with an editor who know the MRX business – anyone can buy a computer with film editing and anyone can pull clips, but there is an art to pulling clips, they know what makes a good sound bit and how to build a story of clips

How to Get Out of the Question/Answer Rut by Susan Fader, Fader & Associates #CRC2014 #MRX

tCRC_brochure2013Live blogging from the Corporate Researchers Conference in Chicago. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

How to Get Out of the Question/Answer Rut by Susan Fader, Fader & Associates

  • use story telling, use all five senses, use 3D
  • if your culture focuses on memorization, creativity is lower
  • everyone has a laundry list of question, take it so you know what people are thinking – who, what, where, when, why, how; questions they think will give them the answers they want
  • when you ask a direct question you don’t necessarily get answers – people feel defense, interrogated, preconceived notions
  • think of a controlled conversation vs free choice
  • do you always talk to heavy users? but even these people aren’t all the same. their behaviour is automatic. they aren’t thinking. it’s all subconscious. they can’t articulate because it’s submerged. must bring the subconscious to conscious.
  • try self-ethnography – have them observe themselves
  • if you have 5 kids, do you THINK about how and why you’re doing laundry? no, it’s automatic
  • need to prime the conversation – get them in the right mindset – use storytelling to do this
  • 80% of the laundry list of questions can be answered by telling a story
  • don’t say “tell me a story about potato chips” say “tell me a story about the world of snack foods” [do NOT get me started!]
  • frame the conversation broadly
  • Financial example – wanted to talk to people who spent at least $2000 in the store, used a group session to talk about loyalty rewards of the program, need to get people in the frame of mind of shopping in the store
    • think about shopping, some of you love shopping, some of you would rather get root canals
    • imagine you have to go to a store and find an outfit, what are you feeling and thinking about that situation – some people are energized, others are sweating
    • they don’t need to read what they wrote, but just tell a story about it
    • takes only ten minutes
  • pharmaceuticals – Hernia surgery
    • general surgeons do 5 to 10 surgeries on a regular basis [did not know that!]
    • they wanted to speak to hernia specialists – 8 to 10 per month – didn’t like that criteria
    • ask them which surgeries they like and dislike, where did hernia surgery fall – they didn’t like it
    • why do you like and dislike these, using a story, people didn’t realize why they gravitated to certain surgeries until they told the stories
    • took ten minutes
    • hernia surgery is non-creative, rote, just about the engineering, doesn’t speak to the creative mind, but when you demonstrate how the tools let you be creative, then surgeons liked it more
  • Orange juice
    • Bring three items from home to help you tell a story, people all brought in the same things – sports
    • but when asked to tell a story they moved from a baseball glove to “i like playing the sport” while the other brand was “i like the team playing”
  • 3D collaging and photo cards – collages are generally automatic pilot, people do what they’re expected to do
    • people didn’t think about getting a flu shot at a pharmacy instead of a doctor
    • why did people who really like diet pop drink a certain brand in full calorie version
    • HIV test – millennials had to have 5 partners over a year – “please tell us a story”  🙂
    •  3D collage of things in your home – “Why would you get a flu vaccine at a pharmacy” – dollar bills, chip bags, cough drops, soap
    • diet vs nondiet – mom created a monopoly game and told her story by playing the game – she put kids fighting on the board, chips on the board
    • someone else used toast, cards
    • in financial services, people include condoms, cars
    • put all the 3D collages on the wall for the story telling
    • people start referring to each other’s collages
    • they work as lie detectors, sometimes they gravitate towards something that wasn’t on their collage, sometimes they can articulate their reasoning
  • Photo cards – there are no people in these cards except for a baby and a witch; they include a range of scenes
    • a group of fish is school time
    • a christmas tree could be surpise of the gifts, sharp needles on the tree, disappointment at getting something you don’t want
    • use about 40 cards – can have story on the wall in 5 to 8 minutes
    • sometimes pair people together for similarities or differences
  • Use game pieces – give people lego, tell them colours mean something, they can communicate taste and smell visually
  • use touch as the springboard – use disruptors, make people come at a discovery in a different way – pick something in a black back and describe it with adjectives. now the assignment is to think of a ~new iphone accessory~ using those adjectives. forces people out of their preconceived notions

Getting to Deeper Insights Using Real Time Mobile Phone Video Chats for Qualitative Research by Rachel Geltman #CASRO #MRX

Live blogging from the #CASRO tech conference in Chicago. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

“Getting to Deeper Insights Using Real Time Mobile Phone Video Chats for Qualitative Research” by Rachel Geltman, CEO, Video Chat Network

  • starbucks case study – saw more vivid language describing the drink, before and after what they were expecting, sensory cues as they were drinking it, stronger reactions to the product versus a scale on a survey, role of a cup of coffee in a day
  • in-home experience was less visceral, more generic, professional descriptions, not the laughter and love seen in the in-store experience
  • case study with SUVs – they ensured safety of the driver first. more descriptive brand imagery, more reflections on themselves as drivers, more under the radar descriptions of tiny little things that no one really pays attention to.
  • in-home experience was more like listening to them recite a commercial they saw on TV, there is was conscious recall of things many of which could be forgotten. you can’t understand the experience of being in the vehicle
  • case study on mobile phone – it’s all about the touch, sensory experience of holding the phone, they’ve already done all the research, they know the pricing. people talk about how it feels, how it looks. people say the like to get a feel for the phone but they can’t put their hand around it because of the weight of the lock in the store [YEAH!!!!]
  • Embedded image permalinkin-home – they had to probe to see if people touched or picked up the phone. lots of talking about what people said or what the salesperson said. people would respond that they picked up the phone but they didn’t really talk about how the phone felt in their hands
  • in-environment testing is a powerful stimulator, more descriptive, more creative, more passionate, more insightful [GET THE WEIGHT OFF THE IN-STORE PHONE. sorry for yelling 🙂 ]
  • latent motivators like touching, sensing happens in-experience not in-home, very vivid and concrete language that a creative person would be desperate to get
  • really good for up-front developmental, exploratory research, good for ‘how should a store be designed’, what should the copy read, how should the packaging be designed

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Five steps towards consumer centric thinking – consumer collaboration and beyond by Tom deRuyck #Qual360 #QRCA

Live blogging from the Qual360 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.qual360

Five steps towards consumer centric thinking – consumer collaboration and beyond 
Tom deRuyck, Head of Consumer Consulting Boards, Insites Consulting
  • you need to talk with consumers every single day and you can do that through consumer consulting boards, 150 people every day
  • you don’t have to do everything consumer’s ask
  • you must have a strategy
  • you cannot fake it, it needs to be transparent
  • it’s not enough to learn things quickly, it’s the speed of execution that counts
  • you need to make consumers an integral part of everything you do
  • how do you create consumer centric company?
  • you need a chief consumer officer, the person in the company who knows most about the customers of the company needs to be there when decisions are being made
  • Consumer collaboration initiative – don’t tackle everything at once, start small but think big, start with one brand or one team and add more later, need to be reactive and proactive, bring down the silos of
  • Create a wall of fame with all the community accomplishments like new products they’ve created, the advertising campaigns they improved
  • Activate internal stakeholders to take relevant actions – forget online, offline, report multiple times with old ways and new ways and even in person when that’s right, inspire them, share your presentations, tell the insights but let them feel the insights through an experience, turn insights into actions
  • Inspire and empower employees at all levels – executives, management, frontline, staff, activate the movers and shakers, motivate not the sales person but the consumer directly
  • Leverage results and culture externally – talk about this in your marketing and make it tangible, tell them the product was co-created, surf the wave of enthusiasm – have community members who helped co-create tell the story
  • Research the impact – measure culture performance and communication, you need a chief consumer officer – consumer coach, people engagers, ecosystem builder, action heros

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