Tag Archives: IIeX

The next generation of market research and insights creation #IIeX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors are my own.

Panel: The Next Generation of Market Research & Insights Creation
;
Moderated by Leonard Murphy (GreenBook) with panelists Chris Enger (Periscope by McKinsey), Tamara Char (Periscope by McKinsey), & Simon Chadwick (Cambiar)

  • Periscope by McKinsey is a suite of tools for collecting learnings, analytics
  • Our entire industry is fragmented, over half of companies that source data did not exist ten years ago and they may not exist ten years form now
  • Technology is not the driver of change, client needs and circumstances are the drivers of change, they are being asked to do far more with budgets lower than they used to be, they much get creative
  • Behavioural data and analytics techniques to analyze that data is suddenly easily available and analyzable, this changes everything about being able to identify insights and work in an agile way, can get to 80/20 answers more quickly, we don’t need the 100% answer, we need to make progress on problem solving
  • Are analytics pushing the business forward, are the ‘researchers’ falling behind and failing to get seat at the table?
  • Need to elevate the quality and consistency of data so that the leadership is never getting three answers to the same question nor are employees hearing diverging answers
  • You must have a c-suite leader and hopefully the chief financial officer who has a longer tenure in a company, not the chief marketing officer
  • The CMO needs to spend time developing strategies not waiting to get data, let the machines do the heavy lifting so the team can spend their time strategizing
  • What is the role of the methodologist, understanding fit for purpose of all the tools, this is why we’re seeing so much fragmentation, 
  • In the USA, people are attracted by tools. In the EU, they are more focused on ideas and creativity, and try to be creative all through the entire process. Need to be less technologically focused in the USA. 
  • Try assigning various people on th c-suite to BE a person in a segment, have them go shopping for her, experience her, all to get them to empathize more clearly, because c-suite lives are so completely different from their segments
  • Is automation a dirty word? Machine learning templates and speeds everything up, may eliminate bias of an individual person although it will perpetuate bias that exists within the data
  • We need to present data for ten minutes and then discuss the oilers and solutions for the remaining 50 minutes

Panel: The GRIT Report & Future Impacts
; Moderated by Leonard Murphy (GreenBook) with panelists Aaron Reid, Ph.D (Sentient Decision Science), Patricia Chapin-Bayley (Toluna), Rick Kelly (Fuel Cycle) & Isaac Rogers (20|20 Research)

  • Automation is mostly used for analysis of surveys data, charting and infographics, analysis of text data, analysis of social media, sampling
  • “My clients aren’t asking me for social media data” no they aren’t, they’re asking someone else
  • Automation frees up time to expand capacity and do more, many things will soon be automated. We must adapt to this or fall by the wayside.
  • Buyers are slow to adopt automation, automation is a dirty word because they think it is DIY and it will be more work. It will actually free up resources and allow you to do more once you are trained and moving forward.
  • Do you want to be at a data collection conference in five years or at an insights conferences? Your business must adopt automation.
  • People don’t CARE if you automate, they want better research insights and thinking. You must have automation to get there.
  • Automation may not cut your budget but it allows you to move your budget into higher value endeavours.
  • What should samplers do? Advise on representativity, enforce length of interview limits, consult on questionnaire design, restrict to mobile only, forbid mobile-unfriendly. it is an absutive relationship – clients don’t want to pay for consumer friendly and respectful questionnaires.
  • There is no such thing as a non-mobile study. Every device must work and work well. You cannot run a survey without mobile respondents or you are guaranteed a nonrepresentative sample. Why is this even a conversation?
  • If you aren’t thinking mobile first, you are being stupid. We spend half of our time on our devices.  It is a data quality issue. [Cannot agree with this comment enough]
  • Educating the researcher of the future – they need critical thinking and storytelling skills. We all need to be critical thinking experts, you shouldn’t in the business without that.  We need to train the current workforce on how to do this. We’ve trained people on how to run cross-tabs but they need training on storytelling and turning insights into action.
  • Quick research doesn’t have to be quick and dirty or poor quality
  • The technology doesn’t matter, the platform doesn’t matter, we need to stop talking about the technology and focus on consultation, understanding the problem 
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Future tech: Real-time feedback, video, and agile research #IIeX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Chaired by Marc Engel 

Service Recovery, Gurt and Paul from Feedtrail

  • [presented with 11 minutes notice so huge kudos to you!)
  • Customer feedback program that measures the experience immediately not 2 days or 2 months from now
  • Helps you ensure the appropriate person knows about the problem immediately so the issue can be resolved immediately
  • You don’t need to wait until the end of your hotel experience to give your review of the bed or the bathroom. Give your review now so they can fix things when you still need them fixed,

Email is Dead. PowerPoint is Dead. Smart Video is Now the Killer Way to Communicate Insights! By Paul Field (Touchcast) 

  • [they set up a live green screen, he’s running all his slides from his cell phone]
  • It’s easier to talk with people using video, more memorable, more expressive, more human
  • You can show videos, products, documents, polls, surveys, quizzes but also be on the screen yourself to point at things or write on the screen
  • They’ve included instagram style filters but nobody uses them. But of course people would be upset if there were no filters 🙂
  • Bit.ly/touchastlive

Empathy: The Real Killer App for Insights by Katja Cahoon (Beacon) 

  • [game to play: write down all the numbers she will say and answer the questions that are to come]
  • Most people write down the four primary colours, bed/table/chair/desk, and Einstein.  Most people choose the same set of common words due to stress and bias, stereotyped, programmed ways of thinking. It’s hard to break out of them during pressure. It happens so during brainstorming sessions too.
  • You can ask questions a different way and get completely different answers. Questions help you develop empathy.
  • Perspective taking – consider from the perspective of the consumer, do you feel you know everything, have you walked in the consumers shoes, have you worn the adult diapers yourself?
  • Don’t judge – is your team diverse or biased?
  • Recognize the emotion in others – do we truly feel what they’re feeling or are we just measuring it
  • Communicate the emotion and understanding – use cocreation 
  • Get out of the well worn thought pathways and brush aside the stereotypes

How to Drive Smarter Product Decisions with Agile Research by Thor Ernstsson (Alpha)

  • Old research is gated decision making, decisions are irreversible, consensus is required.
  • Agile research is high velocity, decisions are reversible, there is disagreement and committment
  • We aren’t building space ships, it’s basic products
  • The problem is never the idea, most people are in their jobs because they know what they are doing
  • It’s okay to launch small decisions that are wrong and reversible that you can continually improve on
  • Change your bias from planning to acting, change from being comfortably predictable to uncomfortably unpredictable, go from upfront exhaustive research to iterative experimentation
  • Be ruthlessly outcome oriented

Merck Showcase – Eye tracking, Values, and Navigating Controversy #IIeX 

Live notetaking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.
Unlocking consumer insights: Navigating controversy using behavioural sciences to change  the conversation by Lee Carter  and Lisa Courtade

  • Crises are always around us, there is no time to think, we’re always under pressure to think and act immediately
  • It’s never been more difficult to be heard. If you don’t tell the story, someone else will. And they might tell it negatively. 
  • Just because you are right does not mean people will believe you. And often, the facts just don’t matter.
  • We’re always on the defensive. Our attempts to correct the record fail. 
  • Crises are emotional and our messages should be emotional as well. We must engage people before we can persuade them.
  • Just because the message makes US feel better doesn’t mean it’s the right message
  • Impact – how personal and emotional is the impact, what are the priorities that are impacted. What is the impact of healthcare, the soda tax to me personally.
  • Values – what beliefs and fears does the issue raise, what underplaying moral foundation is at play. 
  • Language – what language and rhetoric is being and could be used to address the issue
  • Show people you understand why they are upset, show you want the same things they want, show you’re doing something about it, show there’s always room for improvement
  • This can’t take 18 days like it did for United Air, that hurt the entire airlin industry not just them
  • Messaging is rarely prepared in advance. This slows our response time which is damaging. 
  • We need to be in hero mode, not react mode.

Unlocking insight to foster innovation: a values link journey by Andy Ford and Steve Schafer, Brado Creative Insight

  • Learning interesting things is not insight – insight is fresh intimate understanding that has the power to genuinely change behaviour 
  • “I never knew I always wanted this” this is insight. You can only get to insight with empathy.
  • Need to understand values first so take the time to truly understand the consumer, interview theme to understand who they are and WHY they think what they think
  • How does KFC become a breakfast destination? [I am totally open to chicken and waffles 🙂 ]
  • There are key drivers for breakfast – “my time”. The “first bite” needs to be familiar flavours, smells, and textures, a multi sensory experience to set the tone for the rest of the day. 
  • Consumers want a craveable first bite of breakfast but it still has to be familiar. [I think these people are way more into breakfast than I am. Wow.]

Unlocking attention: how eye tracking is boldly going where no market researchers have gone before by Mike Bartels, Tobii Pro

  • Eye trackers used to be stationary and invasive. Now, they’re just a pair of glasses.
  • Why study visual attention – 50% of all neural tissue is related to vision
  • Eye tracking applies to attention in the workplace, training and skill transfer, fatigue and workload analysis, efficiently and error reduction [this is huge for air traffic control and other high stress jobs that have people’s lives on the line]
  • Use eye tracking along with augmented reality so you can test visibility of retail locations
  • You can learn how much people are actually reading messaging or just taking note of the messaging

Behavioural Science Measurement #IIeX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.  
How the classic fairy tale inspired the mobile ad strategy by Vuk Pavlovic, True Impact (Winner of Best New Speaker at #IIeX Europe)

  • What are good guys? Give to others, honest, helpful, kind, polite. What are bad guys? Uninvited, rude, inconsiderate, force their will, vain, self-serving. Which of these reflects your brand?
  • Brands need to humanize the customer and not treat them like eyeballs with a screen. The mobile environment is personal, their own social network, with their friends, in their bedroom. We need better relationships with brands that are this close to us. 
  • Ads need to be seen – attention, be relevant – receptivity, and be chosen.
  • They tested ads during games. The ads were presented only when they person actively stopped the game to get help.
  • Ads viewed during a more convenient time got more view time, more cognitive engagement
  • People ignore pop=up ads but they do pay attention to ads that play at a convenient time. These ads also perform better after the game is finished.
  • Ads viewed by choice get a 40 second view compared to 9 seconds for interrupting ads. Heatmaps show people are less likely to be looking for the X Close button
  • Annoying ads have more engagement and motivation because they are seeking the X Close button
  • Need to consider the person on the other end of the phone. Don’t force them to change the rotation of their phone. If their phone is vertical, then play the ad vertical.

How Home Depot is optimizing the shopper experience by Dan Braker (Brakethrough research) and Brendan Baby (Home Depot)

  • Inverted pyramid – customer sits at the top of the pyramid, front line associates, field support, corporate support, CEO
  • Use a blend of in store eye tracking, qualitative shop alongs, exit surveys, employee interviews and more to give nagivation behaviours, reasons for behaviours,, experience metrics, operational issues, concept screening
  • Asked shoppers on arrival at the store if they would do their shopping trip with eye tracking glasses. Measure area of interest, time in the area of interest, count of shoppers touching or holding a product, time touching or holding a product.
  • Path tracking watches the path they walked through the store, where do people spend much more or less time, is it due to interest or confusion
  • Can measure pupil dilation for engagement measures, can also measure voice pitch analysis if they talk or ask questions
  • Don’t overlook the employees in your research, they know how shoppers navigate, when shoppers need help
  • Need to use emerging and raditional approaches to maximize learnings
  • Changes to store elements should be thoroughly tested before roll out

Leveraging Artificial Intelligence to do Real-time fan research during NASCAR’s biggest race by Brooks Denton (NASCAR) and Andrew Konya (Remesh)

  • Time with friends, cooking and eating, arguments about strategy, social media, ad consumption all together equals the experience
  • Asked a set of questions throughout the race, like a live bulletin board, to collect qualitaive data. Choose a few responses that best reflect the full range of responses and match those with segments and demographics
  •  Build a distribution of opinion for each answer, create a consensus for each answer 
  • Sometimes they show the live responses to people answering the questions to increase engagement and other times they don’t show the other resposnses to maintain research rigour
  • Viewers want split screen commercials, the data proves this and now they can bring that data to the broadcast partners 

The automation of behavioural science by Aaron Reid (Sentient Decision Science)

  • Some associates are hard wired (attractive person, babies) or learned (police cars, spiders)
  • Can you differentiate fear of spiders and spiders using sweat in the hand, do you sweat more for one or the other
  • Automation is a major trend in survey design, push button question types and dashboard reporting, full study design is becoming automated, tracking analysis is automated, regression analysis can be automated [I really hope that a person monitors all of these things because humans creating data are not robots]
  • STICKY does eye tracking online not in the lab, it may not be great right now but we improve so quickly that it’s worth it to get in early
  • We need to automate the science so that cientists can wok on theory, discussion, ideas not button pushing. This gives us time to work on the importat parts. Gives you time to increase empathy for people and brands.

https://vimeo.com/207500225

VR, AR, and Future Tech with Vanguard, Isobar, and SciFutures #IIeX #MRX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors or typos are my own.

Adding innovative techniques to a researcher’s toolbox by Julie Mon, Vanguard

  • They use research companies from among our midst but also a lot of other providers who don’t call themselves researchers.
  • Research used to happen top down, and only show it to clients once the research was  polished. Now they talk to clients first, and then involve the businesseses afterwards.
  • They use IDIs, diary studies, ethnography, eye-tracking, surveys, card sorts, click tests, tree tests, but also newer techniques like design sprints, lean startup, design thinking from user experience research
  • Design thinking: empathize, analyze, synthesis, envision. They used small sample sizes, 6 per region across the country. They started broad and asked general questions about people’s lives and goals, how they organize their money. 
  • Design sprints started with research and brainstorming and in total took 2 or 3 days. They started with competitive research and then brough in ideas from design thinking stage. They came up with a prototype and built a wireframe and then tested a handwritten wireframe with clients. 
  • Collected contextual, heart breaking and heart warming stories around the research that people still talk about. 

Translating emotion science into digital experiences by Jeremy Pincus, Isobar

  • Traditional copy testing measures attitude toward the brand, purchase, recall, memories. But this is not in the moment. It’s highly rational and people in action aren’t rational.
  • Normal biometrics are facial coding but you cant see the face in VR. Google daydream helps but it’s only a simulation of a face, not their real face. Normal eye tracking won’t work. Many of these technologies hide much of your face.
  • Use heart rate, galvanic skin response and other techniques that get right at your physiology. 
  • Measure attention (heart rate, GSR), attention (facial), arousal.

Is there room for science fiction prototyping in the research industry by Ari Popper, SciFutures

  • Early tech is deceptively disappointing.
  • Superpowers – superhomes are adaptive, responsive, learning, insightful. AI will make our homes become extensions of ourselves. What real time data will we get from these homes. 
  • Superhumans – sense no visible light, radio waves, current, magnetic fields, photons, radiation
  • Supermobility – autonomous driving and implications for impulse purchases, decreasing use of convenience stores, road infrastructure, insurance
  • Robots and AI – Lowes has a robot customer service function, they speak 20 languages, can help you find anything in the store, monitor story inventory
  • B2A – business to algorithm [watch this term people!] Robots might become another form of civil struggle and rights. Will you outsource all your decision making to AI?
  • Futuristic product placement – fedex delivery robot, Taco Bell tablets, the shoe in Back to the Future
  • Prototyping in VR – model realistic environments and products and then do research to get the biometrics and emotional measures
  • Grocery store before AR, but after Augmented Reality every package will be messagedexactly to you, also the price and colours. We’ll know exactly every item that was touched or looked at or pushed aside. VR hacks the brain and transports you to a different environment.  It is improving FAST.
  • Imagine testing a new shopping experience with little kids in tow, or cleaning a bathroom twice the size of your own.
  • [Really nice talk to help you get up to speed in these new technologies.]

What clients really think of your marketing #IMD16 #IIeX 

Live notetaking at #IMD16 in chicago. Any errors are my own.

Marketing for MR: What we’ve learned from GRIT, Our clients, and our own marketing by Lauren Tilden and Lukas Pospichal

  • GreenBook mission is to connect researchers regardless of the size of the business
  • What does GRIT tell us – GreenBook research industry trends, it’s for researchers, tell us where we are and where we are going, not being used to inform marketing for research company
  • How do clients choose suppliers? [he shows a hurried tiny bar chart and laughs 🙂 ]
  • Stated importance on GRIT says that relationships matter first, price is last
  • Radio landscape map analysis chart – clustered different criteria for selecting suppliers, quality, experience, consultative skills
  • For small budgets, price is important. But as you move to higher budget its more about quality and consultativeness
  • Top 5 sources – seminars or conferences, industry websites, face to face events, webinars
  • Clients don’t want to be sold to the second you meet them, get to know them first
  • Find out what the company does first before you meet them 
  • Clients say – I want my research to change the decisions of my marketing executives
  • Help your clients promote, distribute and present your research internally
  • Develop templates, resources, processes for them, help them jointly deliver the results to other teams
  • Good marketers have a plan, good marketers go easy on the sell, the second you start a. sales pitch on your webinar people drop out, good marketers have leaders who provide resources and staff, good marketers go where their clients are, not necessarily market research conferences, good marketers experiment
  • Provide value and use it as a lead generation tool,
  • Messaging should focus on a specific person, use real words, eliminate needless words, think about what you want people to do
  • Tuesdays and Fridays at 9am work the best for them, figure out what times work best for your clients
  • Use words like you, you’re, your, create a sense of urgency with words like last chance, or hint to a gift or something free
  • Effective webinars are hot buttons or broadly interesting to many people
  • Teach people something don’t sell, unless the webinar is advertised as a product demo or similar
  • Be unique, or uniquely good
  • Market the market research industry , don’t focus on the features of your company but rather on the benefits
  • Yes or No how


Panel: how to talk to me – what clients really think of your marketing by Matt Marcus, Ayesha Powell, Michael Wechselberger, Erin Attere, and Stacey Symonds

  • They get vendor recommendations from colleagues internally, check greenbook or quirks, or see who did a good piece of research, conference talks are a good place to find new ideas, watching webinars because there is not travel, vendors can recommend someone they trust maybe the person they lean on when they cant take a job
  • Partner is someone they go back to again and again, give a five year contract without thinking twice, they will keep a spot open while waiting for a partner; a one time project is a vendor
  • How does a vendor get to partner status, requires trust, lots of responsibility, by the tie vetting is completely done its almost like they are partners by then
  • Like webinars with case studies, with companies they know and recognize, don’t really look for blogs and not fishing for content
  • Emails without a hard sell are more compelling, want to hear about competitors
  • Know what youre really good at, be aware of the clients business problems or ask them outright and describe your options for responding to it
  • Bring a methodologist with you to a capabilities present, take the phone away because the client is more important than your phone

Marketing successfully as a research company #IMD16 #IIeX 

Live note taking at #IMD16 in chicago. Any errors are my own.

Panel: Strategies of successful research agencies, Gillian Carter, Ross McLeanr, and Arusha Sthanunsathan moderated by Lukas Pospichal

  • Clients don’t know what they’re buying until they are fully on board
  • Use client’s excitement to book speaking engagements, win win for them to shine among peers and the research company can share their expertise through the lense of a client
  • Overcommunication helps to avoid problems, overshare until you’re told not to
  • Daniel Kahneman – experience is measured by most intense positive, negatives, and the end, and these are averaged for an event, measure these points well
  • Use the advantages available to you, whether you are small or large, stand up for what you believe in, smaller companies can react more quickly
  • Best clients will often let you talk about them in sales meetings even if they don’t want you doing so at conferences
  • Leverage client pride in your projects, find all the spaces where their work deserves to be showcased and help them become more publicly recognized, and hey mind doing a case study for us?
  • Work hard to make your clients look smart to their superiors


The future of social markeing by Priscilla McKinney, Little Bird Marketing

  • She gets big respect for being able to say the alphabet backwards really fast
  • Should my company be a pokestop? Is this for business, what is my strategy? What is the right question to ask?
  • You should be asking how do i do this.
  • 200 million numbers are on the do not call list and 44% of direct mail is never opened [me and me]
  • People aren’t watching commercials either so should we move commercials over to where people are watching now?
  • The vehicle/channel is being discarded, consumer behavior is changing
  • People watching changing behavior will win, if you uncover meaning in your own behavior you will win, create epic content and you will win
  • Companies have changed from big media buys to social media buys but they haven’t changed what they’re offering
  • People won’t tolerate impersonal messages anymore
  • Consumers will no long tolerate companies that inconvenience you, “batteries not included” is no longer acceptable
  • Make sure you can get to your own data,  you need meaning of this data
  • We don’t help our clients understand the outside world enough, we focus too much on inside data
  • Your goal isn’t more facebook engagement, your goal is more clients. Potential clients need to find your facebook page, click on your fb CTA, and proceed down the sales funnel
  • ABC – Always be closing, ABH – Always be helpful, is your service helping to make their day better
  • You need to put your top people on content marketing, it’s not a job for interns [oh my, the worst blog posts come from people who are trying to fill word counts not create opinions]
  • We let social media take us wherever it wants to go but you must have a strategy

Branding you: Sales tips for market researchers by Dan Rangel, Survox

  • Join a few meetup groups, and maybe start your own, then you’re in a leadership role
  • Consider putting your photo on your business cards
  • Althways think about WHY should this person do business with me
  • Show them the money, talk about ROI
  • It’s not about you, always listen. 
  • Weekly project plans are important for the larger projects, let client see where the status is, what they will need to do, what you still need to do
  • Nurture the human bond.  Go to a baseball game, lots of fun, lots of talking time, and builds a good relationship

Putting email to work for you, #IIeX, #IMD16 

Live notetakeing at the #IMD16 conference in chicago. Any errors are my own.

No more eblasts: reimagining email for the modern subscriber by Monica Montesa, Aweber

  • Email is not dead, it’s evolved into bigger and better
  • Email shouldn’t be measured by how many subscribers you have
  • Email is not just about making a sale
  • IT’s time to embrace the human on the other end of the email
  • Personalized email get a higher click though, 40% higher
  • Not allowed to use the word eblast, feels one way and self serving, makes content seem like it’s for no one in particular
  • Email is for more than just company news
  • People prefer email communications over social media, but you must deliver value
  • Broadcast email is a one time notice, maybe time sensitive, maybe promotions or discounts, share blog content, maybe include some user generated content like client stories
  • Emails don’t have to be a sales pitch every time, newsletter can remind that you are a thought leader
  • Consider auto-responders, welcome series that triggers for people who just signed up, include evergreen content with no time deadlines, include introduction to you and company, an ebook, contact information, an educational course
  • A course doesn’t need to be a huge thing, maybe five emails positioned together
  • Aim for quality not quantity for an email list
  • List building tactics – set proper expectations, make sure signup form describes the content they will receive, engaging call to action, avoid boring words, offer an incentive to signup like an ebook or checklist or a free consultation
  • Meet your audience where they are, promote your list on your social channels so you can control who sees it, consider ads to drive traffic to the signups
  • Ebooks give a lot of value, Balance value with promotion
  • Consideration – introduce your product as a solution
  • Conversion – convince audience to sign up, don’t be shy about the sale, share testimonials, discounts and consultations work here

Putting your email marketing to work: generating and prequalifying leads at scale, by Ana Jacobsen, Drip from Leadpages

  • Are you happy with your op-in rate?
  • List growth is critical to business growth
  • Is the opt-in on your website hidden? Do people have to hunt for it?
  • Do you ONLY collect emails for your newsletter? 
  • It needs be on the homepage along with something valuable
  • Welcome mat is very important, tell people why to opt-in, spotify uses it to generate users growth, uber takes over the first page for it
  • SumoMe is free and recommended
  • Pop-up or widget is also effective, can be irritating but done well can engage folks. Pinterest does this. L’Oreal does it also but they don’t say sign up for our list, they say sign up for free samples
  • Landing page must stand alone and convince them to convert, no nav bars, no footer, no chat box, just design to get conversion – CARFAX, Oprah website – if there is only one button on the page it will get clicked
  • Least obtrusive is the top bar on the website – HelloBar is free, works well on WordPress
  • But an invite on blog posts, you know they have prequalified themselves as most interested, maybe even match the blog message to the invite message – DrIpForm 
  • How many white papers are on your hard drive, Ryan Dice is a great marketer, recommend following him, but how any of these white papers have you actually read, are people actually engaging with them?
  • The case for campaigns – follow up every white paper download and see if people liked it, wanted to commend on it, or questions, follow up for a 4 week time period
  • Subscribers should not get generic followups, interested visitors will fill out lots of data, can push people towards the right email followup
  • Emails can link to your calendar where they can choose a time to speak with you, reminders stop for them but not for other people

Contented: Learn to love the art of creating relevant stuff by Susan Griffin, Brainjuicer

  • Need to consider what you want to say and what clients want to hear
  • Creating and sharing an asset that is helpful and informative, content has to tell your story, what makes your company te best resource
  • Snail mail now email, travel books are now travel websites
  • Need to apply your principles to your clients and yourselves 
  • Fluency – distinct assets used to recognize a brand act as a toolkit to build market share
  • Fame – how readily a brand coe to mind predicts market share
  • Have many touch pains – website, case studies, white papers, get individual items that work together
  • Mark Earls, Herdmeister, a thought leader around social, we dont do anything by ourselves, light little fires and one of them start a big fire
  • You can say you do conjoint and segmentation but you’re basically telling clients you sell wrenches and screwdrivers, you need to say you understand their needs, those tools aren’t distinctive
  • Don’t be narcissistic brand, use product names that people recognize
  • Marketoonist is great at this, cartoons are $35 and they are powerful story tellers
  • If you’re going to do social media, do it seriously, don’t be the person with 8 followers and 3 tweets
  • Figure out how to blog regularly even if it’s just a tiny share
  • Relevant content comes in different sizes – a tweet, a white paper
  • Recycling is good, you can share old articles again, repurpose the content
  • Don’t scare up personalization, get the name right or don’t use the name at all, make sure first and last names aren’t flipped
  • Content needs to grab people, don’t be bait and switch, be bait and catch
  • A How-To gives readers a quick thing to read of just 5 actionable points that is relevant to a problem

7 steps to the perfect marketing plan by Steve Henke, Harpeth Marketing

Live notetaking at the IMD16 conference in Chicago. Any errors are my own.

  • Don’t go home and begin the content, go home and start planning first
  • Some people in this room don’t have a marketing plan for this year
  • Developed a marketing and sales period which is a 7 step process
  • Start by doing your homework, understand business environment, decide on your strategies which set the tone for the rest, build awareness, generate leader, nurture those lead, create first time clients, create repeat clients
  • Homework tips – 3Cs, company, client, competitors – financial analysis and understand where your revenue is coming from, do a SWOT analysis, do post-project surveys for client satisfaction, projects are the reason they keep coming back to you
  • Pareto principle 20/80 rule works, who are your 20% of clients and what is the commonality, size geographic industry, where are the consistencies, do a year end survey, why did they hire you, what is unique compared to competitors, do they use other companies and why
  • Visit competitors website a few times per year, their services and employees, try some secret shopping
  • 2Is – industry.= what trends will impact the business, new technology, new players
  • A – audit, find somebody outside firm to do a marketing and sales audience, have them review plans, reports, proposals, website, get feedback from someone who doesn’t stare at it everyday
  • Strategy tips – most important part of plan, right strategy will have some success even if tactics aren’t great
  • Know who your ideal buyer is, ideal company you want to sell to, define them clearly to create your plan
  • Points of differentialion, how do you want to be perceived, everybody can’t be great and have great employees, that’s the cost of business
  • Are there opportunities, should you pay attention to big data, at least be aware and consider it, are there problems in the industry or my company that need fixing and will get you far ahead, sometimes education can fix a lot
  • Two kinds of clients – new clients and repeat clients, allocate funds to marketing to both types
  • Work on SMART goals, you can’t just set a goal and expect it to happen, you need to outline activities that help you achieve those goals
  • Growth grid – current vs new products and current clients vs new clients. Core business is current clients and current products. 
  • Awareness – website is the core of your marketing, well written, attractive; go social via linkedin twitter facebook google plus
  • Email marketing – get people to know who you are, stay top of mind, email does this, PPC/SEO/advertising
  • Network and exhibiting need to be added too, people to people environment is also necessary
  • Don’t have a LinkedIn page, have a linkedin presence
  • He’s not a believer in cold calls but do what works for you, if you do a good job, you only have to follow up on leads
  • Good content builds awareness and generates sales leads, give some away through blogs, but ebooks and white paper downloads are emailable leads
  • Webchat on your website costs 20$ a month, can have somebody ready to to chart at any time, lets you see when someone is visitin gand you can jump in right away, don’t expect huge return on it
  • Network and exhibiting are the best, his notebook is the best, he writes down everyname of who he spoke to and what they spoke about, he always writes notes down, even what someone’s hobbies are
  • Linkedin is a quality play, he turns down many invitation, only accepts people that there is a chance with, you can export to email list [careful, in canada this could get your in ltrouble]
  • We often do a bad job of working a booth
  • Get contacts to introduce you to people, their boss and colleagues, and stay in touch with those people, if your one contact leaves then you’re not in trouble
  • Nurture people until they are ready to buy
  • Email is to connect people with content, not to sell. Give them something of value, a blog post.
  • Participate in linkedin groups, that’s where your clients and prospects are
  • Lead nurturing – don’t take everything digital or remote, pick up the phone, go to conferences early and meet with clients
  • Share content by email – i say this email and though you’d like it. Cheers. A really short email. Set up google alerts to find this content.
  • First purchase is the hardest purchase. Please ignore the people you’ve worked with forever and take a chance on me. Need to mitigate this fear. 
  • Have a point of differentiation. Have a proof sources and case studies, clients and logos, white papers. LEt them see they aren’t your first client. Let them see your are knowledgeble enough to write about it. DO you have a first client deal?
  • First time clients – capabilities presentations and proposals are way to long and me focused.  They already know what you do and you don’t need to tell them. YOu don’t need to say how awesome you are. You need to tell them what you can do for them. What’s in it for them. Throw a one page summary of your company at the end of the proposal. 
  • Stay in touch with clients by email, share content, be active, participate in their conversations. Stay top of mind.
  • Project followup – be a client advocate who talks to clients separate from the direct client relationship. Be the problem solver
  • Send a handwritten thank you note. Don’t save the gift basket for the holiday season.

Neuroscience gets the stage (and so does an #AllMalePanel) #IIeX 

Live note-taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. ANy error or bad jokes are my own.

Inspiring vendors to go the distance for exceptional insights by Debbie Balch and Rairo Davila

  • Act as partners not vendors
  • Asked vendors for examples of their work to judge the quality of it, asked for references
  • Clear on setting up objectives and expectations of the research
  • Client showed the vendor examples of reports that worked well in his company
  • You might need to kiss a hundred frogs before you find your prince, trust is necessary but not easy
  • You need to guide the supplier, touch base regularly maybe once a week, not just to track status of project but also to express questions or explain something that has changed in the company
  • Both parties need to be willing to try new and innovative techniques to seek the truth
  • Be flexible and willing to shift
  • [moral of the story – be a nice person]

The brain science of buying by Susan Weinschenk

  • People buy when they feel confident of thir decision [well sometimes]
  • They may not ACTUALLY be confident but they feel they are ready to make the decision
  • It is an unconscious process that can result in a single neuron firing, you cannot be aware of a single neuron firing
  • You just need to make people confident enough to make that one neuron Fire
  • Sometimes you just need one person to say “good decision” to make that neuron fire
  • Dopamine is released when people anticipate, not when they get the reward, the feel good chemical
  • Dopamine makes you seek information, more dopamine is released when the reward is less predictable, we react a lot to unpredictability
  • Remember when the process to buy an iPhone was unpredictable and you had to get on a list that allowed you fill out a form which allowed you to get a phone which allowed you to get a phone, and you didn’t know when any of these things would happen or allow you to get a phone
  • Don’t be afraid to make people wait
  • Most decisions ar Meade unconsciously, 95% of thinking and decisions are unconscious
  • Researchers could predict what choice people would make 10 seconds before the person was award of having made a decisions – using an fMRI
  • People can make up an give you reasons but it probably isn’t the real reason
  • Don’t really on what people say
  • Most buying decisions involve emotions and feelings, not just logic and reasoning
  • If you can’t feel emotions then you can’t make decisions,  when people feel loyal to a brand they have a feeling to the brand, feeling is a precursor to making a decision [I like Ray’s definitions of loyalty – when logic says to do anything else but you do that]
  • People make either a goal directed value based buying decision or they buy from habit, not both
  • Don’t give people all the value information if they are asking a habit decision because people can’t do both at the same time


The real role of emotions in marketing by Caryl Weber

  • We need to reach consumers emotionally
  • The rise of “sadvertising” – brands want to are us cry
  • “A snack for anyone who is seeking experiences” great empty tag line 🙂
  • We are not thinking machines, we are feeling machines that think
  • Emotions guide us unconsciously
  • Why do you buy tide, mom uses it, friend uses it, like the colour, you’re guided to a habit forming purchase
  • Showing people pictures of something will make them more likely to choose something later on related to those pictures, even when it’s stages away in terms of something like Puma to cats to dogs
  • Go beyond words when you position a brand, embrace the messiness of abstract feelings and emotions, music, characters, images can be a brand statement or strategy document
  • How you say it may matter more than what you say – the lighting, the colours, language used, tonality – meta communication 
  • Feeling of an ad lasts longer than a rational message
  • Can build these feelings into the features of the packaging 
  • Emotions guide us unconsciously, brands are vast messy networks in the mind, meta communication is more important than you think


GreenBook research industry trends panel on the future of insights: Kevin Lonnie, Mark Simon, Cillin Manaois, Steve Phillips, Niels Schillewaert, Aaron Reid, Dave Carruthers

  • #AllMalePanel

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