Tag Archives: IIeX

What clients really think of your marketing #IMD16 #IIeX 

Live notetaking at #IMD16 in chicago. Any errors are my own.

Marketing for MR: What we’ve learned from GRIT, Our clients, and our own marketing by Lauren Tilden and Lukas Pospichal

  • GreenBook mission is to connect researchers regardless of the size of the business
  • What does GRIT tell us – GreenBook research industry trends, it’s for researchers, tell us where we are and where we are going, not being used to inform marketing for research company
  • How do clients choose suppliers? [he shows a hurried tiny bar chart and laughs 🙂 ]
  • Stated importance on GRIT says that relationships matter first, price is last
  • Radio landscape map analysis chart – clustered different criteria for selecting suppliers, quality, experience, consultative skills
  • For small budgets, price is important. But as you move to higher budget its more about quality and consultativeness
  • Top 5 sources – seminars or conferences, industry websites, face to face events, webinars
  • Clients don’t want to be sold to the second you meet them, get to know them first
  • Find out what the company does first before you meet them 
  • Clients say – I want my research to change the decisions of my marketing executives
  • Help your clients promote, distribute and present your research internally
  • Develop templates, resources, processes for them, help them jointly deliver the results to other teams
  • Good marketers have a plan, good marketers go easy on the sell, the second you start a. sales pitch on your webinar people drop out, good marketers have leaders who provide resources and staff, good marketers go where their clients are, not necessarily market research conferences, good marketers experiment
  • Provide value and use it as a lead generation tool,
  • Messaging should focus on a specific person, use real words, eliminate needless words, think about what you want people to do
  • Tuesdays and Fridays at 9am work the best for them, figure out what times work best for your clients
  • Use words like you, you’re, your, create a sense of urgency with words like last chance, or hint to a gift or something free
  • Effective webinars are hot buttons or broadly interesting to many people
  • Teach people something don’t sell, unless the webinar is advertised as a product demo or similar
  • Be unique, or uniquely good
  • Market the market research industry , don’t focus on the features of your company but rather on the benefits
  • Yes or No how


Panel: how to talk to me – what clients really think of your marketing by Matt Marcus, Ayesha Powell, Michael Wechselberger, Erin Attere, and Stacey Symonds

  • They get vendor recommendations from colleagues internally, check greenbook or quirks, or see who did a good piece of research, conference talks are a good place to find new ideas, watching webinars because there is not travel, vendors can recommend someone they trust maybe the person they lean on when they cant take a job
  • Partner is someone they go back to again and again, give a five year contract without thinking twice, they will keep a spot open while waiting for a partner; a one time project is a vendor
  • How does a vendor get to partner status, requires trust, lots of responsibility, by the tie vetting is completely done its almost like they are partners by then
  • Like webinars with case studies, with companies they know and recognize, don’t really look for blogs and not fishing for content
  • Emails without a hard sell are more compelling, want to hear about competitors
  • Know what youre really good at, be aware of the clients business problems or ask them outright and describe your options for responding to it
  • Bring a methodologist with you to a capabilities present, take the phone away because the client is more important than your phone

Marketing successfully as a research company #IMD16 #IIeX 

Live note taking at #IMD16 in chicago. Any errors are my own.

Panel: Strategies of successful research agencies, Gillian Carter, Ross McLeanr, and Arusha Sthanunsathan moderated by Lukas Pospichal

  • Clients don’t know what they’re buying until they are fully on board
  • Use client’s excitement to book speaking engagements, win win for them to shine among peers and the research company can share their expertise through the lense of a client
  • Overcommunication helps to avoid problems, overshare until you’re told not to
  • Daniel Kahneman – experience is measured by most intense positive, negatives, and the end, and these are averaged for an event, measure these points well
  • Use the advantages available to you, whether you are small or large, stand up for what you believe in, smaller companies can react more quickly
  • Best clients will often let you talk about them in sales meetings even if they don’t want you doing so at conferences
  • Leverage client pride in your projects, find all the spaces where their work deserves to be showcased and help them become more publicly recognized, and hey mind doing a case study for us?
  • Work hard to make your clients look smart to their superiors


The future of social markeing by Priscilla McKinney, Little Bird Marketing

  • She gets big respect for being able to say the alphabet backwards really fast
  • Should my company be a pokestop? Is this for business, what is my strategy? What is the right question to ask?
  • You should be asking how do i do this.
  • 200 million numbers are on the do not call list and 44% of direct mail is never opened [me and me]
  • People aren’t watching commercials either so should we move commercials over to where people are watching now?
  • The vehicle/channel is being discarded, consumer behavior is changing
  • People watching changing behavior will win, if you uncover meaning in your own behavior you will win, create epic content and you will win
  • Companies have changed from big media buys to social media buys but they haven’t changed what they’re offering
  • People won’t tolerate impersonal messages anymore
  • Consumers will no long tolerate companies that inconvenience you, “batteries not included” is no longer acceptable
  • Make sure you can get to your own data,  you need meaning of this data
  • We don’t help our clients understand the outside world enough, we focus too much on inside data
  • Your goal isn’t more facebook engagement, your goal is more clients. Potential clients need to find your facebook page, click on your fb CTA, and proceed down the sales funnel
  • ABC – Always be closing, ABH – Always be helpful, is your service helping to make their day better
  • You need to put your top people on content marketing, it’s not a job for interns [oh my, the worst blog posts come from people who are trying to fill word counts not create opinions]
  • We let social media take us wherever it wants to go but you must have a strategy

Branding you: Sales tips for market researchers by Dan Rangel, Survox

  • Join a few meetup groups, and maybe start your own, then you’re in a leadership role
  • Consider putting your photo on your business cards
  • Althways think about WHY should this person do business with me
  • Show them the money, talk about ROI
  • It’s not about you, always listen. 
  • Weekly project plans are important for the larger projects, let client see where the status is, what they will need to do, what you still need to do
  • Nurture the human bond.  Go to a baseball game, lots of fun, lots of talking time, and builds a good relationship

Putting email to work for you, #IIeX, #IMD16 

Live notetakeing at the #IMD16 conference in chicago. Any errors are my own.

No more eblasts: reimagining email for the modern subscriber by Monica Montesa, Aweber

  • Email is not dead, it’s evolved into bigger and better
  • Email shouldn’t be measured by how many subscribers you have
  • Email is not just about making a sale
  • IT’s time to embrace the human on the other end of the email
  • Personalized email get a higher click though, 40% higher
  • Not allowed to use the word eblast, feels one way and self serving, makes content seem like it’s for no one in particular
  • Email is for more than just company news
  • People prefer email communications over social media, but you must deliver value
  • Broadcast email is a one time notice, maybe time sensitive, maybe promotions or discounts, share blog content, maybe include some user generated content like client stories
  • Emails don’t have to be a sales pitch every time, newsletter can remind that you are a thought leader
  • Consider auto-responders, welcome series that triggers for people who just signed up, include evergreen content with no time deadlines, include introduction to you and company, an ebook, contact information, an educational course
  • A course doesn’t need to be a huge thing, maybe five emails positioned together
  • Aim for quality not quantity for an email list
  • List building tactics – set proper expectations, make sure signup form describes the content they will receive, engaging call to action, avoid boring words, offer an incentive to signup like an ebook or checklist or a free consultation
  • Meet your audience where they are, promote your list on your social channels so you can control who sees it, consider ads to drive traffic to the signups
  • Ebooks give a lot of value, Balance value with promotion
  • Consideration – introduce your product as a solution
  • Conversion – convince audience to sign up, don’t be shy about the sale, share testimonials, discounts and consultations work here

Putting your email marketing to work: generating and prequalifying leads at scale, by Ana Jacobsen, Drip from Leadpages

  • Are you happy with your op-in rate?
  • List growth is critical to business growth
  • Is the opt-in on your website hidden? Do people have to hunt for it?
  • Do you ONLY collect emails for your newsletter? 
  • It needs be on the homepage along with something valuable
  • Welcome mat is very important, tell people why to opt-in, spotify uses it to generate users growth, uber takes over the first page for it
  • SumoMe is free and recommended
  • Pop-up or widget is also effective, can be irritating but done well can engage folks. Pinterest does this. L’Oreal does it also but they don’t say sign up for our list, they say sign up for free samples
  • Landing page must stand alone and convince them to convert, no nav bars, no footer, no chat box, just design to get conversion – CARFAX, Oprah website – if there is only one button on the page it will get clicked
  • Least obtrusive is the top bar on the website – HelloBar is free, works well on WordPress
  • But an invite on blog posts, you know they have prequalified themselves as most interested, maybe even match the blog message to the invite message – DrIpForm 
  • How many white papers are on your hard drive, Ryan Dice is a great marketer, recommend following him, but how any of these white papers have you actually read, are people actually engaging with them?
  • The case for campaigns – follow up every white paper download and see if people liked it, wanted to commend on it, or questions, follow up for a 4 week time period
  • Subscribers should not get generic followups, interested visitors will fill out lots of data, can push people towards the right email followup
  • Emails can link to your calendar where they can choose a time to speak with you, reminders stop for them but not for other people

Contented: Learn to love the art of creating relevant stuff by Susan Griffin, Brainjuicer

  • Need to consider what you want to say and what clients want to hear
  • Creating and sharing an asset that is helpful and informative, content has to tell your story, what makes your company te best resource
  • Snail mail now email, travel books are now travel websites
  • Need to apply your principles to your clients and yourselves 
  • Fluency – distinct assets used to recognize a brand act as a toolkit to build market share
  • Fame – how readily a brand coe to mind predicts market share
  • Have many touch pains – website, case studies, white papers, get individual items that work together
  • Mark Earls, Herdmeister, a thought leader around social, we dont do anything by ourselves, light little fires and one of them start a big fire
  • You can say you do conjoint and segmentation but you’re basically telling clients you sell wrenches and screwdrivers, you need to say you understand their needs, those tools aren’t distinctive
  • Don’t be narcissistic brand, use product names that people recognize
  • Marketoonist is great at this, cartoons are $35 and they are powerful story tellers
  • If you’re going to do social media, do it seriously, don’t be the person with 8 followers and 3 tweets
  • Figure out how to blog regularly even if it’s just a tiny share
  • Relevant content comes in different sizes – a tweet, a white paper
  • Recycling is good, you can share old articles again, repurpose the content
  • Don’t scare up personalization, get the name right or don’t use the name at all, make sure first and last names aren’t flipped
  • Content needs to grab people, don’t be bait and switch, be bait and catch
  • A How-To gives readers a quick thing to read of just 5 actionable points that is relevant to a problem

7 steps to the perfect marketing plan by Steve Henke, Harpeth Marketing

Live notetaking at the IMD16 conference in Chicago. Any errors are my own.

  • Don’t go home and begin the content, go home and start planning first
  • Some people in this room don’t have a marketing plan for this year
  • Developed a marketing and sales period which is a 7 step process
  • Start by doing your homework, understand business environment, decide on your strategies which set the tone for the rest, build awareness, generate leader, nurture those lead, create first time clients, create repeat clients
  • Homework tips – 3Cs, company, client, competitors – financial analysis and understand where your revenue is coming from, do a SWOT analysis, do post-project surveys for client satisfaction, projects are the reason they keep coming back to you
  • Pareto principle 20/80 rule works, who are your 20% of clients and what is the commonality, size geographic industry, where are the consistencies, do a year end survey, why did they hire you, what is unique compared to competitors, do they use other companies and why
  • Visit competitors website a few times per year, their services and employees, try some secret shopping
  • 2Is – industry.= what trends will impact the business, new technology, new players
  • A – audit, find somebody outside firm to do a marketing and sales audience, have them review plans, reports, proposals, website, get feedback from someone who doesn’t stare at it everyday
  • Strategy tips – most important part of plan, right strategy will have some success even if tactics aren’t great
  • Know who your ideal buyer is, ideal company you want to sell to, define them clearly to create your plan
  • Points of differentialion, how do you want to be perceived, everybody can’t be great and have great employees, that’s the cost of business
  • Are there opportunities, should you pay attention to big data, at least be aware and consider it, are there problems in the industry or my company that need fixing and will get you far ahead, sometimes education can fix a lot
  • Two kinds of clients – new clients and repeat clients, allocate funds to marketing to both types
  • Work on SMART goals, you can’t just set a goal and expect it to happen, you need to outline activities that help you achieve those goals
  • Growth grid – current vs new products and current clients vs new clients. Core business is current clients and current products. 
  • Awareness – website is the core of your marketing, well written, attractive; go social via linkedin twitter facebook google plus
  • Email marketing – get people to know who you are, stay top of mind, email does this, PPC/SEO/advertising
  • Network and exhibiting need to be added too, people to people environment is also necessary
  • Don’t have a LinkedIn page, have a linkedin presence
  • He’s not a believer in cold calls but do what works for you, if you do a good job, you only have to follow up on leads
  • Good content builds awareness and generates sales leads, give some away through blogs, but ebooks and white paper downloads are emailable leads
  • Webchat on your website costs 20$ a month, can have somebody ready to to chart at any time, lets you see when someone is visitin gand you can jump in right away, don’t expect huge return on it
  • Network and exhibiting are the best, his notebook is the best, he writes down everyname of who he spoke to and what they spoke about, he always writes notes down, even what someone’s hobbies are
  • Linkedin is a quality play, he turns down many invitation, only accepts people that there is a chance with, you can export to email list [careful, in canada this could get your in ltrouble]
  • We often do a bad job of working a booth
  • Get contacts to introduce you to people, their boss and colleagues, and stay in touch with those people, if your one contact leaves then you’re not in trouble
  • Nurture people until they are ready to buy
  • Email is to connect people with content, not to sell. Give them something of value, a blog post.
  • Participate in linkedin groups, that’s where your clients and prospects are
  • Lead nurturing – don’t take everything digital or remote, pick up the phone, go to conferences early and meet with clients
  • Share content by email – i say this email and though you’d like it. Cheers. A really short email. Set up google alerts to find this content.
  • First purchase is the hardest purchase. Please ignore the people you’ve worked with forever and take a chance on me. Need to mitigate this fear. 
  • Have a point of differentiation. Have a proof sources and case studies, clients and logos, white papers. LEt them see they aren’t your first client. Let them see your are knowledgeble enough to write about it. DO you have a first client deal?
  • First time clients – capabilities presentations and proposals are way to long and me focused.  They already know what you do and you don’t need to tell them. YOu don’t need to say how awesome you are. You need to tell them what you can do for them. What’s in it for them. Throw a one page summary of your company at the end of the proposal. 
  • Stay in touch with clients by email, share content, be active, participate in their conversations. Stay top of mind.
  • Project followup – be a client advocate who talks to clients separate from the direct client relationship. Be the problem solver
  • Send a handwritten thank you note. Don’t save the gift basket for the holiday season.

Neuroscience gets the stage (and so does an #AllMalePanel) #IIeX 

Live note-taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. ANy error or bad jokes are my own.

Inspiring vendors to go the distance for exceptional insights by Debbie Balch and Rairo Davila

  • Act as partners not vendors
  • Asked vendors for examples of their work to judge the quality of it, asked for references
  • Clear on setting up objectives and expectations of the research
  • Client showed the vendor examples of reports that worked well in his company
  • You might need to kiss a hundred frogs before you find your prince, trust is necessary but not easy
  • You need to guide the supplier, touch base regularly maybe once a week, not just to track status of project but also to express questions or explain something that has changed in the company
  • Both parties need to be willing to try new and innovative techniques to seek the truth
  • Be flexible and willing to shift
  • [moral of the story – be a nice person]

The brain science of buying by Susan Weinschenk

  • People buy when they feel confident of thir decision [well sometimes]
  • They may not ACTUALLY be confident but they feel they are ready to make the decision
  • It is an unconscious process that can result in a single neuron firing, you cannot be aware of a single neuron firing
  • You just need to make people confident enough to make that one neuron Fire
  • Sometimes you just need one person to say “good decision” to make that neuron fire
  • Dopamine is released when people anticipate, not when they get the reward, the feel good chemical
  • Dopamine makes you seek information, more dopamine is released when the reward is less predictable, we react a lot to unpredictability
  • Remember when the process to buy an iPhone was unpredictable and you had to get on a list that allowed you fill out a form which allowed you to get a phone which allowed you to get a phone, and you didn’t know when any of these things would happen or allow you to get a phone
  • Don’t be afraid to make people wait
  • Most decisions ar Meade unconsciously, 95% of thinking and decisions are unconscious
  • Researchers could predict what choice people would make 10 seconds before the person was award of having made a decisions – using an fMRI
  • People can make up an give you reasons but it probably isn’t the real reason
  • Don’t really on what people say
  • Most buying decisions involve emotions and feelings, not just logic and reasoning
  • If you can’t feel emotions then you can’t make decisions,  when people feel loyal to a brand they have a feeling to the brand, feeling is a precursor to making a decision [I like Ray’s definitions of loyalty – when logic says to do anything else but you do that]
  • People make either a goal directed value based buying decision or they buy from habit, not both
  • Don’t give people all the value information if they are asking a habit decision because people can’t do both at the same time


The real role of emotions in marketing by Caryl Weber

  • We need to reach consumers emotionally
  • The rise of “sadvertising” – brands want to are us cry
  • “A snack for anyone who is seeking experiences” great empty tag line 🙂
  • We are not thinking machines, we are feeling machines that think
  • Emotions guide us unconsciously
  • Why do you buy tide, mom uses it, friend uses it, like the colour, you’re guided to a habit forming purchase
  • Showing people pictures of something will make them more likely to choose something later on related to those pictures, even when it’s stages away in terms of something like Puma to cats to dogs
  • Go beyond words when you position a brand, embrace the messiness of abstract feelings and emotions, music, characters, images can be a brand statement or strategy document
  • How you say it may matter more than what you say – the lighting, the colours, language used, tonality – meta communication 
  • Feeling of an ad lasts longer than a rational message
  • Can build these feelings into the features of the packaging 
  • Emotions guide us unconsciously, brands are vast messy networks in the mind, meta communication is more important than you think


GreenBook research industry trends panel on the future of insights: Kevin Lonnie, Mark Simon, Cillin Manaois, Steve Phillips, Niels Schillewaert, Aaron Reid, Dave Carruthers

  • #AllMalePanel

Bravery in market research takes many forms 

For the second time in two weeks I am humbled to accept an award.

This evening, the Research Liberation Front awarded me with a Ginny Valentine Badge of Courage for calling the industry to account. I guess what this means is that from now on, I am no longer encouraged but rather required to name names when conferences don’t create gender parity on stage. 

It is too late to say you didn’t realize it wasn’t balanced. Too late to say you tried. Too late to say women didn’t submit. 

When people don’t see themselves on stage, they feel like they are not part of the community. If your conference doesn’t go above and beyond to create parity on stage, ask yourself if you truly care about it, if you truly want to see it at the next conference. If you can’t do it today, then why would women/minorities want to submit to your next conference. 

CREATE the change we want to see. 

And ladies, HOLD UP YOUR END OF THE BARGAIN. Submit to conferences, say YES when you are offered a spot, push your female colleagues to submit and speak. 

[Insert inspirational music here] Together, we CAN do this.

Nonconscious Impact Measurement #IIeX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own

The politics of emotion and reason by Aaron Reid

  • Some ads saw Bernie decrease his positives and Hillary decrease her negatives
  • During election years, people remember new products much less, it’s usually 60% but in those years it’s 30%; how do you touch people in those years – things like puppy monkey baby help 
  • 40 million online plays, 750 000 social actions, 6% of share of Super Bowl social ads, women less likely to like, millenial males loved it
  • How do you measure nonconscious associations – millisecond timing of swipes on a computer screen can be used
  • When implicit is added to measurements, social contagion correlations increase a lot from .3 to .6 has been seen
  • Implicit measures captures something unique
  • Predicting sales volumes of tables to cereal to soda, have seen r square go up to .9


An insights introspective: einstein’s definition of insanity and the future of consumer insight by Randy Adis and Andrew Baron

  • Problem solving requires new approaches, what should we be doing differently
  • Most companies are traditional market researchers or business contributors, only 10% are strategic insights or insights as so competitive advantage companies; we are still order takers
  • We used to have bigger teams and more funding but now smaller teams are asked to do more work
  • We used to get the time we needed and now everything is a fire
  • We used to have control over our funding but now MR reports to marketing and the CMO who determine our priorities 
  • Now we’re asked to know many kinds of research
  • Clients expect to do more data analytics, data integration, digital ad optimization, customer experience, path to purchase, digital focus groups
  • Small data is the new big data, big data train has been running for a while and we are losing touch with our consumers
  • Prediction without why means you are less likely to be able to repeat things
  • If you don’t like change, you’ll like irrelevance a lot less
  • Now we must be a scientist/sleuth, marketer who understands the problems, salesperson who can overcome inertia, champion/advocate to institutionalize something in an organization, strategist to help marketers figure out what to do with insights, brand steward
  • Humans are not fully conscious of their decisions, most often we think system 1 fast, law of least effort
  • People are accustomed to having an answer for thing seven if they don’t know the answer
  • Are you doing enough semiotics, ethnography, neuroscience (fmri, eeg), biometrics, predictive markets, implicit tests, metaphor elicitation – add a picture of a brain scan to anythign and believe ar Elmore likely to believe it


Future of advertising is the brain – why branded content’s success will be driven by neuroscience by Kevin Keane

  • 500 million people block mobile ads, 80% want to skip TV commercials, 80% mute online video
  • [my thoughts if anyone cares, if they put only one or two ads on a page I wouldn’t care. Bunches of videos flashing in my face like confetti R simply scream download an ad blocker]
  • Branded content is ready to take over
  • In 1860s wine companies sponsored theatre shows and stars
  • John Oliver went to town on native advertising recently {I’ll have to find that!}
  • Projected to grow to 25 billion in just a few years, hard to say where it is now or where it will be but it will be huge growth
  • More advertisers are turning into publishers
  • Content marketing is the only marketing left – Seth godin
  • Best branded content always provides value by understanding the user’s need and addresses those needs
  • Execution is a separate issue – can do meaningless content like Wayne’s World holding a Pepsi in front of his face or CocaCola on American Idol
  • The Achilles heel is measurement
  • Advertisers want to connect with consumers but need proof of that connection
  • Publishers need to grow audiences not alienate them and they need ad money
  • Consumers have near infinite amount of choice, competition for attention is fierce, hello facebook!
  • Enter neuroscience
  • Cools light wanted lots of brand on screen, TSN didn’t want so much bran on screen to be more authentic – what is the right way to do it
  • Best sports had the brand elements on screen, need to integrate the brand meaningfully, branded content outperformed, authentic stuff works a lot better
  • RBC did a 20 episode content where the didn’t reveal the brand until the 12th episode – double digit improvements
  • Brands were too nervous to move forward with a new paradigm without seeing neuroscience data


Strategic brand meaning management: aligning associations, metaphors and emotions for enduring brand relationships by Anders Bengtsson and Roberto Cymrot

  • We buy brands for what they mean not just waht they do
  • The worlds most successful brands manage brand meaning
  • CocaCola is moving to a single brand advertising for efficiencies, Coke Zero is ten years old and this could be risky for them to lose ads that are simply Coke Zero ads
  • Respondents need only a few minutes, can be done on mobile, pose a question like consider a person who drives this brand, select an image that describes that person, then ask people to describe the image and interpret the image
  • From it see emotions, personality traits, associations, attributes
  • Let’s them see functional attributes that trigger emotions
  • Can leverage the imagery in image clouds
  • Mercedes gets images of horse, golf clubs, mansions, a certain type of old money status, country club, classic people, established 
  • BMB gets mountain climbing, socializing, adventurous, roller coaster, a certain type of new money and a different type of person altogether – Bsuiness people, urban professional, young and successful, confidence entrepreneur 

Workshops: Video insights and Second City for humour in storytelling

Live note taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Workshop: Empowering people with video insight by Dave Carruthers 

  • People remember stories not statistics
  • Video is important because edit gives unrivalled depth, replace open ends with video, get 50% more content with video
  • text boxes are becoming less and less effective, “it was great”. “I liked it”
  • Video gets us closer to the moment of truth, adds authenticity, video brings consumers to life with emotion
  • Video is at the heart of everything we do, Facebook, Instagram, snapchat, this is how people want to do thing snow
  • Challenge is doing video at scale, but we are solving this problem
  • Early video research was difficult, cumbersome, time consuming, need to watch and code all this video
  • Got 350 videos this morning in just a few hours, asked people to rank Hillary and Donald on numerous issues, how can you build a report in 20 minutes, that’s what we’re going to do
  • [now we go into three workgroups to turn hundreds of videos into reports. The room is FULL so introverts are safe if they stick to the back. 🙂 ]
  • We’ve got fifteen minutes to make a video
  • The videos have verbatim text beside them and the words are coded with the time they were said so you can extract it easily, people have manually transcribed the videos
  • Words have frequency counts so you can see what topics come up the most, can set aside topics to review
  • Can select what is relevant to you [could be very biased depending on who is selecting the topics and videos]
  • Software snips out the piece of video related to the topics you chose
  • Can add sentiment score to video, overlay captions
  • Videos are put online with passwords to avoid some privacy issues
  • [quite like this system as long as caveats around research bias are transparent]


Workshop: adaptive storytelling – know your brand, know your audience by Piero Procacci

  • Do corporate entertainment, training, facilitating, and using the tools of improve to understand brand insights
  • How to move from iprovisation to storytelling – go big then go small, wide then narrow
  • Improv is a mind body experience
  • [Here goes, everyone is asked to stand up and now we’re going to do the wave  and some screaming. ]
  • Half of people nervous about improv, easier to engage if there is unconditional support from everyone, create an environment of no judgement, show this through lots of applause
  • Volunteer on stage, huge applause for the first nervous person, we are asked to applause every single thing she does, even if it’s just saying her name, We are now applauding her every tiny word
  • She liked the applause but was still really nervous even thought everyone was clapping, she got to experience full cycle even with a tiny event , she trusted what she said was right and moved forward from there
  • Today, we assume everything we say is right, say the first thing that comes to mind, say it, then censor it so that it’s more funny the next time, build on what you already said
  • Reserve all judgement of self and others, we tend to judge ourselves first, we focus on ourselves first even though no one really else is
  • Now we’re asked to introduce ourselves to partners and chat with each other, one person in each pair is asked to raise their hand, and the other perso will begin, the risk taker gets to go second; asked to plan a party for your own birthday party, respond to every idea with “no, because”; next person takes their turn and responds to every idea with “Yes” and add something to the idea
  • Hearing no makes it hard to keep going, had to come up with more and more safe options, just want to quit, ideas are less innovative and risky, it’s a normal experience, we hear no a lot in life because it keeps us safe, we default to no when yes would benefit us more, it’s okay to say no but don’t default to no
  • Hearing yes let people be even more outrageous, couldn’t have a bad idea, took more risks, more laughter, more fun, less scary, puts us at ease
  • Brand stage event – company is in theatre, invite consumer audience, have a cast of improvisers and musicians, see connections that we wouldn’t notice otherwise, alternate discussion and iprovisation, discussion gets to emotion more quickly
  • Find a new partner now, pick a favorite story you both know, tell it to the other person in less than a minute, now the other person has to tell the story in only 30 seconds, now it has to be told in ten seconds, and now in a reasonable length single sentence, now tell the story in the “I” form, now tell the story from the point of view of a different character in the original story
  • Shortest story needs you to make a key point, more theory and images  than details, focus only on what matters, short takes more time than the longer story, (have to talk faster), have to eliminate information that is irrelevant to the audience, have to focus on the audience more than yourself, not eliminate what you think is uninteresting but what is irrelevant 
  • Telling story from another point of view generate different details, more intimate, more emotional, more vulnerable
  • Workshops help people see a new way of communicating, being more open and accepting
  • Get feedback before something is fully baked
  • Don’t take yourself so seriously, lighten up and be open to a different perspective, play gets teams more engaged, improv is about compassion and empathy, can deal with delicate issues this way, people become more willing to share because they create a safe space
  • Use humour to empathize not to entertain, play humour to help the conversation, may not be humor in the end but motivational

The future of insights #IIeX 

Live note-taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Impacting clients: Raising the bar by Andrew Cannon, Alex Hunt, Simon Chadwick, Kathy Cochran

  • There is stiff competition ahead, are we making a big enough impact, can we crack the ROI question
  • Is the c suite more interested in customer insight than they used to be?
  • Are we earning our seat at the table [or…. Are we setting that damn table!!]
  • Google this: GRBN100day. Challenge website,  put your name on a list of people who have committed to make a difference towards the research industry – value to clients, and ROI impact, enter your name and email address. [DO THIS, I signed up 🙂 ]
  • Why the emphasis on ROI, you can’t demonstrate this because ther’s too much in between my research and the real world. – wrong. 
  • Only 1 in 5 are delivering strategic value that makes a different for business outcomes
  • Must have a positive championing relationship with the C suite, without this, the research function will never be more than a contributor, will never reach strategic level, must prove your worth so they will stand up and champion you, they need to see you as a pillar not a jolly good thing
  • The more advanced the research function is, the more likely they and clients are happier, and that they are measuring ROI; if you measure ROI, you are likely a strategic partner
  • Marketers regard insights function as purely librarians,  marketers want us to be strategic consultants
  • [how do leaders lead? They continue the panel when the moderator is gone. THAT’S HOW YOU DO IT!]
  • ROI doens’t have to be in an algorithm, think small, don’t get overwhelmed, have a dashboard for tracking, start small and build
  • How many research companies are famous for driving an initiative
  • Insight folks need a strategic plan,, doesn’t need to be fifty pages, plan the next 3 to 5 years, what information do you have, what areas are you missing, where will you help drive innovatio
  • Everyone. wants to be a strategic partner, what does that really mean, you need to BE a strategic partner, if you are at a meeting BE a strategic partner, MAKE a decision, HAVE an opinion, connect the dots,, be the person. Who makes the connections and states the real implications
  • Tactical – we are inconsistent in explaining the wider business challenges, making recommendation
  • ROI word gets people’s defences up
  • Mobile is faster, cheaper, better – frame that for your business clients
  • Don’t underestimate the power of anecdotes
  • THink of the Dove brand – made millions for the Unilever brand, promote the value of what we do


Using social media intelligence to analyze category and brand performance against changing benefits by Natasha Stevens

  • [Natasha chairs the Boston chapter of the New Research Speakers Club. If you’re NEVER spoken at a conference before, please come! Http://researchspeakersclub.com]
  • Natasha is a coffee fan, she used to choose a local coffee house, now she orders her coffee while she’s on the train to work, she doesn’t wait for her coffee because it’s ready at hand when she walks in the door
  • The market place is ever changing where benefits are the currency
  • Digital has transformed the landscape of influences and opportunities
  • Brands need to stay abreast of categories and how your business will be impacted
  • What’s being said about how get the job. Done, which needs are discusse
  •  All market decisions trace back to four cornerstones – security, well being, gratification, and freedom
  • Alcon contact lens case study – most was about well being, then gratification, brands performed differently within the category;; security is a hygiene factors in this category,,  they needed to create an educational format because users were seeking advice from ophthalmologists online


The compass and the map of content marketing insights by Andres Almeida. and Peter McCue

  • The running of the wiener dogs, an absolute disaster; this is us as analytics trying to measure custom content 
  • We have metrics and measurement but we don’t know what they mean because we don’t have a compass to tell us where we should be
  • We have page views, visitors, social actions, but WHY do we look at all this
  • RElating to beer – Time spent with content plotted against social actions taken – celebrities, comedy, and sports/football stood out; Celebrities account for low social interactions, people are too embarrassed to share those things
  • Ford F-150 – rank videos by views and you can see disparity in high view and low view counts, more inspiring and informative language rose to the top, audience wants information AND inspiration
  • Eight content moment types – some perform better for certain topics
  • No one wants to be inspired by political content but they want information [good chart here but can’t read a it of it. [FONT SIZE people ]

Shopper insights for foresights #IIeX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

I didn’t do anything wrong: The inventor’s dilemma by RIck West

  • In 1989, lots of people had nokia’s which were awesome phones at the time, bricks that never broke. In 2008, smartphones started to enter the market. Why did Nokia go from 55% share to 3%? They did nothing wrong so how did they lose?
  • We don’t want to be sitting here five years from now screaming that we’re relevant
  • But I invented this and we coined this phrase!
  • Today, no one swipes their credit card on a physical charge machine. We swipe in on a Square. No bank certified that charge marchine.  Inventors of the charge machine are now out of business.
  • Five years from now, you will not be doing the same business you’re doing now without major change

Completing the consumer journey with purchase analytics by Jared Schrieber and Bridget Gilbert

  • How do people purchase alcohol for attending an event
  • Data collected from a purchase panel, people take photos of every receipt they get from every purchase everywhere
  • Groups “The Socialite” and “The Rebel” – rebel spends 20% more
  • Trigger, ready to buy, and buy – three stages of the purchase
  • Journey for millenials is straightforward – invited to some event, think about the occasion, speak to someone, mental budget, added to list, talk to friends, check the fridge section, check for sales, compare prices, buy [darn it, I tried to avoid millenial talks!]
  • Millenials are always talking to someone at some point in the journey 
  • Key differentiator with rebels is they don’t speak to people, they have ghost influencers, more likely to say they bought someone else’s favorite type of alcohol, they are thinking about friends or family or whoever will be attending the event [or is this simply self justification of a larger purchase – “it’s not for me”]
  • Socialite – liquor store, express lane, after 5pm, shop in pairs, has a baby, lower income
  • Rebels – grocery store, stock up trip, before 5pm, shops alone, has a pet, higher income 

Brands and American mythology: Narrative identify, brand identity, and the construction of the American self by Jim White

  • We are all tellers of tales, give our lives meaning and coherence 
  • We don’t construct this identity in a vacuum, it’s within our culture, the mythology of our culture, we try to align our lives with the this we’re familiar with
  • We edit and reedit our identities
  • Brand strategists need to spend  more time listening to consumer stories
  • We rarely step back and listen to customers talk about themselves
  • Six languages of redemption – atonement, emancipation, upward mobility, recovery, enlightenment, development
  • We use brands to tell ourselves stories about who we are, to try and give ourselves some reality
  • Brands can be markers in our lives, can tap into that notion of our lives
  • Understand how personal myths draw from cultural myths
  • Ask people to tell stories about themselves not about your brand
  • Find the tensions they need to resolve, can my brand help smooth those contradictions, actualize th story they want to tell

Reimagining the traditional consumer panel by Bijal Shah

  • She’s a promotions company and they have millions of purchase records in their database, they are not a data company
  • Rely on panels but there is a sever lack of scale, not enough information about the entire population
  • We try multiple data sources but often can’t link sources
  • Partner with a DMP to make your data actionable like krux, lotame, Adobe
  • Find unique data source to enhance your data assets

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