Tag Archives: AI

The ideology of data by Sasha Gryjicic, @SashaG, Dentsu Aegis Network, #BigDataTO #BigData #AI #Intelligence

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • Data marketing and artificial intelligence are headed in the wrong direction
  • Marketing is the pursuit of convincing someone they need something, marketing is a commercial outcome to propel the broader economy forward, marketing uses media and communications to convince, largely based on human language
  • Data is a digital expression of something in the world, organized and stored in many ways. We are finally getting the external world to use a single language but we can’t read this language. Humans don’t read binary code or extrapolations of code. 
  • Data violates the notion of scarcity and data is almost always out of both time and space context for necessity. Data is necessarily incomplete and it is not that thing itself. Data has inherent biases, is super messy, and contradictory
  • We use data to optimize things that have already happened, or we generalize what we learn from data to engineer more of those outcomes, e.g., when managing an online store, we optimize data to get optimal business outcomes but this doesn’t help us learn why or what drives the decisions
  • Intelligence is the ability to gather, category, organize inputs, store, reflect, and respond to them. For humans, intelligence is innate, structured, organized, and process oriented. We have a fixed capacity of intelligence and are creative with it. It is not the result of external stimulus.
  • Language is the best way for humans to get access to our intelligence. It’s the language we use when we think. We talk to ourselves more than we talk to others. 
  • The AI we’re building is like automated statistics. We brute force relationships and create a black box of intelligence. We don’t understand why a computer makes certain decisions because we cannot hold enough variables in our mind to understand. Are algorithms intelligence or optimization? We are drifting further from understanding what intelligence really is. It’s not AI at all.
  • We’re accelerating the fatigue of positive reinforcement. We’re following bad after bad. We’re heading away from language which is the only way to understand ourselves. 
  • Intelligence seems to include morality, the ability to store and reflect and take decisions based on reflections.
  • We need to back away from disorganized data. We need to pause and relfect on what we see in the data to understand ourselves better. We need to dive into our own intelligence better. Reflecting on something is more important that acting on something.

Future of the smart home by Emily Taylor and Manish Nargas, IDC Canada, #BigDataTO #SmartHome #ConnectedHome #AI

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • By 2020, every home will have 40 connected devices – TV, appliances, health, assistance, security 
  • Wearables help consumers track and log their activities such as wellness goals, athletic training, weight loss monitoring, medication reminders, gamification of activities. 1 in 5 Canadians currently own a device as a wristband or a watch and 70% of those owners have no plans to upgrade or replace. 60% of consumers are not interested in wearables at all. Designs will be less obvious, have improved battery life, and use new materials like smart fabrics. Medical devices will have better reliability and validity and this will help the healthcare sector and be relevant for insurance companies
  • Security devices – smoke alarms, motion sensors, doorbells, security systems, remote home monitoring. These devices offer peace of mind. It’s no longer about emergency services but monitoring to see if the kids are home, a window is opened, the jewelry box is still there, perhaps even see if it’s a friend or foe at your front door. 
  • Home automation – these devices will help us reduce energy usage, increase safety including devices such as thermostats, light switches, outlets, appliances. IKEA has launched a smart home lighting system with wire-free lighting at a lower cost than their competitor. They will bring this technology into every piece of furniture and curtains [window blankets 🙂 ]
  • Personal health devices – These devices will result in increased awareness of monitoring. Health monitoring will take place from the home not a hospital and will result in fewer trips to the doctor and hospital. Connected clothing will help with this. Gym equipment brands now sync with health monitoring devices so you can monitor treadmill and walking together and get more consistent results. 
  • Intelligent assistants/bots – more natural way to interact with machines, removes the complexity of interconnections, vocalizes thought and activity, uses real time machine learning. Low adoption rates in Canada but many bots aren’t available in Canada. Connecting a speaker to the internet isn’t revolutionary but it can improve personalization. 60% of Canadians don’t care about bots but bots are here to stay. It is Alexa and soon will be your butler. It will be ubiquitous.
  • There are gaps. Many devices are siloed right now. They have limited conversations with other smart home devices. The market is too focused on DIY right now as people want to solve specific problems not do the entire home in one shot. There is little support across the solutions. 
  • Do you need a smart-fork that monitors how quickly you eat? Do you need this fork to connect to your lights and smoke alarm?

When will we drive autonomous vehicles, by Kashmir Zahid, Ericsson Digital Services (Great talk) #BigDataTO #BigData #AI #Automation

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • 1996 GM introduced Onstar. It had a weak interface, few features, and was mainly designed to offer roadside assistance.
  • 2010 saw in-car navigation but it still wasn’t user friendly nor easy to operate while you were driving.
  • 2012 Tesla built an all electric car and people could finally see the possibilities of vehicles with electricity and connectivity. Now that vehicles had so much digital, manufacturers could no longer stay in the shadows and let dealerships handle all the consumer interactions.
  • 2014 Apple CarPlay and android auto were introduced. Connectivity was embedded in the car from the time it was installed in the factory as opposed to being added by the consumer after the fact. 
  • 2015 remote diagnostics are now available, repairs can now be recommended by the vehicle rather than going to the dealership or following the manual. 
  • 2015 Tesla creates autopilot, a self guiding car but the user is still expected to take physical control when needed. 
  • 2017, the Google car is no longer a science project, it is a reality. 

At CES, three trends were noted

1. cars will be integrated into your life and communicate with your personal device, e.g., your home will be ready to receive you when you arrive, the temperature is set appropriately, the lights are turned on, the garage door is opened, and the turkey is ready to be taken out of the oven

2. Automation will create a natural experience of talking to your car, Alexa is winning here [although it just accidentally bought Whole Foods so I don’t know about the quality at this point]

3. Car to car communication – this will allow vehicles to see and talk to each other, so they can maintain speed and safety among other cars on the road

  • Now that everything talks to everything, our user experiences will be completely transformed. 
  • By 2020, 90% of cars will be connected
  • 4 trends in the industry

1. Cars must be connected, software defined car

2. Electrification, ITS, infrastructure

3. Automation, connected automated mobility

4. New business models, multi industry ecosystems

  • This is the largest change in transportation since Ford’s model T
  • Soon, we will have everything we need to travel but we won’t own the car. [Think of music, we no longer own the music we buy and we could lose it instantly if Apple decides to shut something down]
  • Insurance will depend on how you drive, your telemetrics. And later on, insurance won’t be necessary as human drivers won’t be responsible for safety. 
  • Emergency assistance providers will be affected as cars will have embedded systems that alert first responders instantly to ask if you are safe. 
  • Government providers will need to reconsider what legislation is needed to take care of drivers and roads. 
  • 13 out of 14 of the big vehicle manufactures plan to make an autonomous vehicle in the next couple of years
  • Google, Apple, Intel, Microsoft and Amazon have focus and investment in self driving car projects. Telecom operators like AT&T, verizon, Vodafone see the potential of new revenue in self driving car. Uber, Lyft, DIDI and many other startups are trying to disrupt the traditional car ownership model. 
  • The passenger economy will be worth $7 trillion by 2050. 
  • We are about to see consumer mobility as a service – one stop shop for transportation for everyone who doesn’t own a car [this is amazing for people who don’t know how to drive, are too old to drive, too young to drive, not well enough to drive] 
  • This will save over half a million lives due to safety from fewer accidents. And, it will free up your time since you don’t have to physically drive.
  • We are two years away from letting people sleep in a Tesla on long road trips where the car has not made the trip before – Elon Musk
  • Challenges

1. Public safety – people need to trust the machine to work while they sleep. 

2. Data privacy and security – who has, uses, and sells my data. It’s not transparent right now. 

3. Rules and Regulations – Who is liable for an accident? Who owns the vehicle that caused the accident?

  • Connected cars will open multiple innovative services. 
  • They will improve the efficiency and security of new value added services for both consumers and enterprises. 

Highlights from Day 1 of the #BigDataTO Conference #BigData #AI

I’ll admit I didn’t have high hopes. How good could a free conference about big data and artificial intelligence be? Especially if the upgrade tickets, which I so frugally declined, were only $75? Well, I was pleasantly surprised.

Let’s deal with the negatives first. The morning registration line was long and it took some people 30 minutes o get through it. The exhibition hall was small with not nearly as many vendors as I am used to seeing at conferences. There was no free wifi in the main hall (um, admission was free so why do we deserve free wifi too?). Sometimes the sessions were so packed, there wasn’t even room to stand. And, some speakers didn’t even show up because, well, airplanes.

However, those negatives were completely washed aside with the positives. Some of the talks were quite good. Some of the speakers were quite good. The topics were quite good. They gave out free conference programs. And did I say free? Some free things are worth what you paid for them. This one was worth a lot more. I highly advise you to go and it’s definitely on my 2018 conference schedule as time well spent.

So, here are a few tidbits of knowledge from a bunch of different speakers that intrigued me today.

  • Data science is often handled at the tail-end of a project. We only take the time to learn what happened after the fact and when it’s too late to do anything about the current situation. We need to do a better job of using our data for the future – for segmentation, targeting, to understand what our customers want, to uncover blind spots.
  • Good data scientists care where the data came from, who created it, what it represents. They don’t just take the data and run it through stats programs and spit out reports. It’s not just about statistics and reporting. Data quality must come first.
  • The real money is not in having the data but rather in knowing what questions to ask. Literally everyone has data but only the companies that hire the smart brains to ask the right questions will succeed with big data.
  • You might think using artificial intelligence is very impersonal. On the contrary. It’s impossible for a human being to be personal with hundreds and thousands of people but AI allows you to be far MORE personal  with thousands or millions of people.
  • Computers and artificial intelligence need to learn the senses – for instance, they need to learn to see the types of moles on skin that will become cancer, learn to hear which wheels on a train are cracked and about to cause a train wreck.
  • Algorithms are what make computer see and listen and as such algorithms are the future. Soon, companies will brag about their algorithms not their data.
  • We need to let computers do the pattern recognition so that humans can do the strategizing and reasoning
  • If you want to work with big data but can’t afford it, have no fears. So much software is free and open source. You can do anything you want with free tools so don’t let dollars hold you back from doing or learning.
  • The danger with artificial intelligence is training it with bad, untrustworthy, biased data. We’ve all seen the reports of AI perpetuating racism because the training data contained racist data. You must choose good datasets that are clean and genuinely unbiased and only then will you find success.
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