Tag Archives: technology

Voxpopme 3: Is market research slow to adopt new technologies?

Along with a group of market resevoxpopme logoarchers from around the world, I was asked to participate in Voxpopme Perspectives – an initiative wherein insights industry experts share ideas about a variety of topics via video. You can read more about it here or watch the videos here. Viewers can then reach out over Twitter or upload their own video response. I’m more of a writer so you’ll catch me blogging rather than vlogging. 🙂

Episode 3: Think about the barriers and resistance to new technology in the research industry that you’ve come across. People say that market research is slow to adopt. Is it true?

No. 100% no.

My absolute defiance to this question stems from one very important definition: what is market research? For me, market research is any scientific process (whether qualitative and quantitative!) that helps us to better understand consumers and markets. As you see, that definition says nothing about surveys or focus groups or big data or artificial intelligence. Methods and technology play no part. Companies  marketing themselves in the market research business play no part. That definition doesn’t say System 1 Research, Affectiva, or Ipsos. It also doesn’t say Google, Facebook, or Tesla.

With that in mind, the market research industry is full steam ahead. We are awash with companies at the forefront of artificial intelligence, machine learning, neural networks, virtual/augmented/modified/extreme reality. If you can name a way awesome technology, I can guarantee you that someone is using it for market research purposes. Of course, the company might have been formed three months ago in someone’s basement or maybe even two years ago. And, even though they’re doing it, the company might not even know what “market research” or “consumer research” is.

What our industry is REALLY good at is claiming that other industries are trying to barge into our territory. We’re REALLY resistant at acknowledging that market research companies exist outside of those claiming a spot on market research supplier lists. That there are many other companies doing what we thought we could claim as MINE MINE MINE.

So on that note, if you’re looking forward to a career in market research, don’t necessarily seek out a company that markets themselves as market researchers. Seek out companies that work to understand consumers and markets, whatever the name or size of the company and whatever industry or methodology they use. There are a ton of really cool companies out there doing some amazing things even though they’ve never heard of ESOMAR, MRIA, Insights Association, ARF, AMSRS, or MRS before. Once you’re there, feel free to introduce us to them. We’re lovely people!

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Voxpopme 6: How does market research maintain trust when fake news is perceived to be rife?

Along with a group of market resevoxpopme logoarchers from around the world, I was asked to participate in Voxpopme Perspectives – an initiative wherein insights industry experts share ideas about a variety of topics via video. You can read more about it here or watch the videos here. Viewers can then reach out over Twitter or upload their own video response. I’m more of a writer so you’ll catch me blogging rather than vlogging. 🙂

Episode 6: How does market research maintain trust and authority in modern times where fake news and misinformation are perceived to be rife?

There are a few things we can do.

First, despite how expertise is being discredited more and more these days, let’s be more open and transparent about our credentials. More than simply degrees and experience, let’s talk about our membership in recognized industry associations such as Insights Association, MRIA, MRS, AMSRS, and Esomar, as well as ISO certifications. Let’s do more than simply mention we’re members, and instead start our conversations with that fact. Let’s describe what it means to be a member in good standing in terms of the code of standards and ethics we abide by. Let’s put those logos on the first page of our reports, and even include with them some of the ethics and standards statements that are most relevant to the specific project. Let’s use these as reminders for our clients that we always act in their best interest, and in the best interest of the research project, even if the results don’t work out the way we had hoped.

Second, let’s be more transparent with clients. Let’s tell clients about all of the strengths and weaknesses of our research processes, about the things that changed unexpectedly along the way, even if it means disappointing them. When we can’t achieve the response rate, sample size, or cost per complete that they require, let’s tell them right from the beginning and be clear about why it can’t be done. When the results we generate are completely unexpected and don’t line up with our hypotheses or norms, let’s be open and honest about what might have happened and whether there might be a problem. Let’s worry less about not winning a job, and more about demonstrating our commitment to the integrity of results. The secondary bonus of this transparency is that we can educate less experienced buyers on how research can be positively and negatively impacted by a variety of known and unknown variables so that they will be more informed buyers in the future.

Third, let’s be better public advocates. When we see our research in the media, let’s ensure the results, conclusions, and recommendations are clearly properly represented. And when they aren’t, let’s get in touch with the media to help them understand what the issue is, including telling them why margin of error or making a certain generalization isn’t appropriate. And if they refuse to correct the misinterpretation, let’s make a public statement to right the wrong, perhaps with a note on your website sharing details about how the information should be properly interpreted. And along the way, if we learn that certain media channels regularly misinterpret results, let’s reconsider working with those channels and even the clients that work with those channels. Every one of us has a part to play in helping to ensure our research results are properly portrayed.

Thinking about research in a new way: Perspectives from six speakers #IIeX #MRX #NewMR 

Live blogged in Amsterdam at #IIeX. Any errors, bad jokes, or [comments in brackets] are my own

  
Technology in Insights – From adapting to cope to adopting to win by Vijay Raj, Unilever

  • 64% of dollars spent last year could be associated with digital
  • The Internet of things is now the Internet of MY things and YOUR things, fridges that know when you run out of milk and order it for you
  • 90% of Internet connections in China happen on the mobile phone
  • We plunked paper surveys online without changing anything, polls are now failing to predict the outcome of general elections, the world of insights needs to change
  • We need to adopt technology, not just adapt to it
  • We need to engage with startups and look for inspiration in technology 
  • Only google was able to predict how Barack Obama would win his first election [do it 20 times and then come talk to me. Anyone can be right once.]
  • Pilots are oxygen to ideas, they help develop and grow them
  • We need to be more collaborative and externally focused
  • Take advantage of gamification
  • LAST mile path mapping – maybe you make a purchase in Pinterest, it’s good to know that path to purchase, cookies don’t work in-app so how do you do this
  • EMOTIONS understanding – need a tech intervention
  • ARTIFICIAL intelligence – I have the answer, what is your question; can you simulate a product experience 
  • PERSONALIZATION
  • Acronym is LEAP – be disruptive

Fame, Feeling, and Fluency Drives Famour 5-star Marketing by John Kearon, Brainjuicer

  • Psychology has more to offer the market research industry than technology [totally agree! Tech is nothing if you don’t understand the people behind it.]
  • 50 polls last year were unable to predict the election [i’m going to guess polls that DID predict were stuffed in drawers because they were ‘wrong’]
  • We are not good at predicting our own behaviour, it’s not that people are lying
  • Current model of marketing is its a fist of a USP wrapped in velvet glove of emotion, the gloves lures customers and then we hit and persuade them to buy, it’s a persuasion model
  • System 1 is the original instinctive brain, system 2 is the rational logical brain. But the emotional brain massively outnumbers the rational brain. 
  • [insert his original Dr Seuss poem here :). ]
  • We think much less than we think we think
  • “You haven’t slept till you’ve been in a Nielsen presentation”  [oooooooo from the audience 🙂 ]
  • Profit growth is driven by fame, felling, fluency
  • Fame – we ascribe wonderful things to famous things, famous is bigger, we don’t know truth but we assume famous is bigger/better/more, predict brand share by top of mind, fame is a shortcut to making decisions
  • Feeling – the more you feel about a brand, whether positive or negative, any emotion is more valuable than no emotion, neutral is the enemy
  • Fluency – distinctive assets but don’t really have any differentiation, eg., Apple ear buds are white and everyone knows it, the Coke bottle shape, recognition spreads decision, people ascribe value to something they recognize 
  • Trump – is famous, evokes emotion, and his hair is very fluent
  • VW – you might think scandal would hurt them but prediction is 18 months after the scandal they will be doing better – more fame, more feeling even thought neutrals have moved to negative
  • [another Dr Seuss poem, you’ll have to ask for it 🙂 ]
  • Human behavior works via satisficing – we make decisions in the quickest easiest way

Market research adventures in a digital world: How Air France – KLM is using research – by Maaike van der Horn, KLM

  • 28 million passengers, 134 destinations, 67 countries
  • More digital touchpoint S are necessary to help and serve customers
  • The iceland eruption was a huge learning opportunity for them in terms of having social media touch points
  • Build, learn, try and do it all quickly, “Be cool or be gone”
  • Why should surveys be so horrible? Consider your survey as a brand experience, follow same standards as website or app – fun to use, easy to use, create something that is not a hassle and takes only three minutes
  • 95% completion rate for the survey, reliability of results has improved 
  • Innovation isn’t always about shiny new things, maybe it’s just improving things that have been wrong for years [Hello every tracker out there!]
  • When they find out that people like their app, they ask them to rate it in the App Store and that is high they work to get the highest rating in the App Store [Totally understand this but it’s a great reminder that app scores aren’t all that meaningful]
  • They do A/B testing on the app and ask people why they like certain aspects
  • Developed branded community platform, perhaps week long projects
  • Research is integral not an aside, it is a huge opportunity to deliver on your brand experience [of course, this only applies if you aren’t doing blind research, which most of us are.]
  • Was forced to be agile when conducting research, delaying things by one or two days is fine [well, we are ALL being pressured to be agile but we’re resisting. Maybe it’s time to stop resisting and be agile when the job is appropriate]

Freeing Research Through Technology by Stephen Phillips, ZappiStore

  • Google has outsourced it’s machine learning code, will likely be a huge deal in years to come
  • Sampling is important – must be done right, need the right target group, but there might be little added value including a human being
  • We need to automate as much of the research cycle as possible, where humans provide the least value, get rid of the manual elements 
  • People move away from full service because they don’t have the time to wait for it, but you can put your IP into templated technology that can be scaled and automated
  • Templated technology lets you run five projects at once, quickly
  • Turn the human away from advisor on a survey to advisor on a project
  • Analytics becomes more simple to do, can do macro analytics across 100 projects all with the same measurement points
  • High end consulting is where the people need to be, along with IP creation. This makes research more profitable.

Drain Your Shark Tank by Jeff Reynolds, LRW

  • Negative emotions drive change
  • Be willing to take risks, be willin to try new ideas
  • Invite everyone to participate, not just the senior experience people but the people who haven’t yet been contaminated with experience and process
  • Tried out shark tank idea but over time people stopped liking it because only the best ideas went there, not the halfway ideas
  • Recognize the smarts on your time, even when they are fresh out of school
  • Require big changes in mindset not big financial incentive

Live Connection to Culture by Jake Steadman, Twitter

  • [i expected him to say “hello I’m jake from State Farm :)]
  • Mobile is eating other media time
  • Used Twitter to connect with fans and opinion leaders in launch and opening weekend for new Star Wars, this is how they gave access to the stars, not the red carpet or panels
  • 1.2 billion tweets over opening weekend
  • Twitter offers unfiltered raw emotion that previously was nearly impossible to get, especially on a live basis
  • Rise of the machines – this is a challenge and opportunity, live data can help us
  • Agility – get over obsession with precision [here here! our research isn’t as precise as we think it is anyways]
  • Democratization of research – as more machines rise, more people can do research
  • Look for your soggy fries – company found a spike related to this phrase and decided to look into. It wasn’t necessarily statistically significant nor huge but directional was enough for them to recognize an issue and deal with it

Five Rapid-Fire Tech Innovation Pitches #CASRO #MRX

Live blogging from the #CASRO tech conference in Chicago. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

AscribeDean Kotchka, Chief Product Officer

  • manage unstructured text
  • better to be lucky than good, luck is when preparation meets opportunity
  • homeworkforce.net was the original name of the company – outsourcing coding work to people around the country
  • Ascribeneeded software to make coders more productive
  • originally turned down by top MR firms but the firms were interested in their software, not their services
  • the software itself caused disruption
  • process 300 million comments this year, globally
  • now can code audio, video, images
  • have automated coding models, text analytics, sentiment and constructs
  • aiming for facial coding, image similarity, auto translation, context sensitive brand identification

Cross-Tab Marketing ServicesStephan Mayer, Vice President, Operations & Client ServicesCross Tab

  • troublesome data file searches, error prone retrieval, weak or wrong linkages, short shelf live of data
  • put all historical data on one platform
  • search semantically for data, filter, create custom reports

InContext SolutionsRich Scamehorn, Chief Research Officer

  • bring virtual reality to consumers over the internet
  • could be CPG or restaurants, electronics, stadium, airport
  • attempt is to put people in the real context of real world at individual level
  • incontext solutions logoinsights into how it might be in the real world
  • [ah, airport does have people all over the place including lines]
  • starts with screening as you would for a survey or any other study, when qualify then go through virtual shopping
  • can use home computer and mouse and keyboard, give people as ‘mission’ like go buy a specific product and then they have control to walk through the environment on their own, they can pick up a product by clicking on it, full 3D viewing and zooming of product [also very cool, this I would like to try]
  • clients can mess around with the content or placement of a sign, done through drag and drop interface, build a pallet display
  • collaborate and iterate with team or retailers and test it
  • want to extend to other business decisions – decision trees, what do they do if a product isn’t there? buy a different product? go somewhere else?
  • want to integrate third party data as well

TrueSampleMark Menig, General Manager 

  • around since 2008
  • multi-panel membership is quite high
  • 11% of survey responses come from people who are on just one panel
  • 20% of survey responses come from people who are on 10 or more panels
  • machine fingerprinting can help control duplicate respondents especially when accessing multiple panels for responders
  • duplicates represent a high proportion of poor quality markers
  • now imagine the problem where one person is on multiple panels AND they use a laptop, a work computer, a mobile phone and a tablet. they can no longer be seen as one person. they are four people now.
  • TrueMatch is aimed at multi-device duplicates

VennliDan Farrell, Vice President, Customer Success and Sales

  • Vennlie – SAS application to collect and interpret insights
  • Venn diagram of customer, company, and competition
  • madlib format of statement which flows through to a survey
  • Vennlidesignate choice factors that customers used among offerings – price, quality, features, prestige, accessibility
  • survey has 4 sections – screener, rating, ownership and intent, demographics
  • client uploads their CRM list using salesforce or whatever they use, can use sampling strategy over time if need be
  • ask clients to take the same survey based on how they think their clients will respond, to identify disconnects [fabulous idea]
  • assign items to various portions of a venn diagram of customer, company, competition

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Minority Report: Collaborative Insight Synthesis and Immersive Storytelling by Mark Kershisnik #CASRO #MRX

Live blogging from the #CASRO tech conference in Chicago. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Minority Report: Collaborative Insight Synthesis and Immersive Storytelling by Mark Kershisnik, Senior Director Global Market Research & Operations, Eli Lilly and Company

  • from choppy understanding to uniform action – insights need to be really put into play, no point unless you use it
    when we have an issue of not selling – we go off and say we need this new and that new all of which costs a lot of money
  • let’s move from a bunch of people with a bunch of ideas to one uniform message
  • eli lilly is a big pharma company with a big research component, lots of tech in all phases of the research work
  • how can we speed up these insights
  • we need to massively leverage technology, we need cross functional team member engagement, we need quantitative MRX and social media analysis and clinical data
  • Ask: please develop the capability to aid the creation and capture of evolved human thought, and make it real time collaborative and virtual, and immersive would be really good too, and we only have this much money
  • do you still use white boards and cameras to share information among employees? why aren’t you using massive high res touch display systems?
  • explorer room – bring your FRIENDS into the room via technology, extensible, immersive, virtual; real time knowledge synthesis with contributor and participants knowledge; cloud connected, super computing enabled, product studio
  • English: The logo of Eli Lilly and Company.they record all the stories with customers, patients, physicians, payers, employees, you have a movie of what happens over the entire experience
  • being in a room feels like like you can hear about it, see pictures, read about it , but you have to feel the emotion and experience the impact
  • allows you to put a human face and human emotion
  • everything comes together, all data, in one place
  • The CLUE center is a window into the world, 7 to 10 projects per day, watching focus groups and IDIs around the world from this room, sometimes 30 or 40 people from every functional discipline watching
  • try to do everything in the first person, don’t want to translate it into a powerpoint slide
  • when people hear it directly from the person with the problem, it creates new perspective
  • immersion environments let people see things, it occupies their entire field of vision
  • Embedded image permalinkenjoying a live feed from the CLUE explorer room right right now  [think of all the CSI TV shows that flick the screens all over the place, yeah, like that, and more] See this Vine video
  • collectively truly understand what people are going through by allowing everyone in the production chain to truly see what’s happening and how people feel
  • saves millions in dollars in travel by so many people all around the world
  • we’ll get to play with the tech over lunch time [people are going to love that. imagine all your social media outlets on a giant screen covering the entire wall. yeah, drooling 🙂  ]
  • have converted to phonetically searchable [stunning!!!]

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