Tag Archives: TMRE

Beyond Ethnography by Paulette Kish #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats of @Conversition. This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

***                                                                                                          ***

  • The less you reflect your consumers, the more you need to build empathy
  • Dogs to empathy very well :). They have instinctual way to get to know each other. Humans don’t have that sniffing benefit. 🙂
  • Some places attract certain people like Harley Davidson, Apple, Avon. You work for them because you like them.
  • Leadership needs to understand consumer
  • When you look in the mirror, do you see your consumer “I don’t do the shopping” “I use the company store” “I don’t have time for twitter” These are empathy gaps.
  • We KNOW what they feel. We know HOW they think and what they do. We need to FEEL what they feel. We can relate to WHY they think. We need to turn knowledge into the ability to feel.
  • Research tools help but they are not sufficient

    Harley-Davidson Hummer single-cylinder motorcycle

    Image via Wikipedia

  • Cultivate empathy! [I really like this. This is a unique perspective]
  • Working in beverages, she always sipped product. She didn’t drink a pop like a consumer would. Taste is not everything.  She brought the 11 ounce bottle to a meeting and told people to drink it. They couldnt’ finish the bottle. Do what the consumer will be doing. Put it in the right behaviour. Look at satiation and wear out for beverages.
  • Empathize with people who have a different situation. Open packages with gloves on.
  • Walk in your shoppers shoes. Wear their hats.
  • Touch point inventory. Consumer sabbatical. Empathy journal.
  • Touchpoint is process of each phase of shopper journey. Inventory of touchpoints. Identify empathy gaps. Explore, prepare, consumer, restore, dispose, shop, buy, transport, returnign it, read, wathc listen, share it
  • Sabbatical -if you aren’t a shopper, go shopping. if you don’t cook, cook. If you don’t have kids, borrow some (don’t steal them). Set a tight budget, plan and shop for 5, prepare and serve all week. See where the tradeoffs are. Don’t imagine it, do it.[love this ]
  • Journal your feels, look for patterns. detail all the facts and your feelings, opinions, emotions.
  • Company culture – get more people involved, immersion retreat or extreme ethnography [EXTREME!!!!] Moving a focus group to a different room does not count
  • Engage senior leadership, project teams, move away from the office, mix job functions, debrief every day. Discuss how it impacts your business.
  • do it at least once per year, but three seasonal sessions works well.
  • Digital discover – look at online language, read it, immerse yourself, follow the links
  • Get off the couch, get beyond migrated qualitative – shadowing, day in the life, no videos, no cameras, mystery shopping, get into personal ethnography.

Beyond Ethnography: Creating a Culture
Committed to Consumer Empathy
Paulette Kish, Strategic Insights Officer, Mars Petcare

My Tobii demo, I FINALLY get to try eyetracking! #TMRE #MRX

If you follow my tweets at all, you know I’ve been itching to try out some eyetracking software. Tobii finally gave me the chance to do that at the TMRE. Below are two videos. The first is me watching the commercial, kindly filmed by the Tobii folks. The second is the result of my viewing where you can see what my eyeballs focused on as I watched the commercial. Very neat stuff!

What do people look at on store shelves? On magazine ads? On car dashboards? In the candy store? On the shelf of 18 pies…. Wait… It’s lunch time 🙂

Emotion Mining by Thomas Snyder #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats of @Conversition. This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

***                                                                                                          ***

The Neuroscience of It All
Thomas Snyder, MD PhD, Chairman and Founder,
Emotion Mining

  • Why and what to motivate people to buy our products?
  • Decision making is options, prices, promotions which is rational. Add the smartphone to that. There is clutter and noise and bias. This interferes with all decisions.
  • Clutter is the environment, including the internet. Noise is the influence. Bias is the kind of day we are having, our moods, and temperaments.
  • The market place is motivation overload. For information overload, look at the words. For motivation overload, look at the colours.
  • Our methods identify the book we bought, not the book we want to buy.
  • Self-report is the core of our methods. it is rational. It lies about true feelings.  People acquiesce, or don’t care, or hate it.
  • Subconscious mind plays a role in all decisions. We experience conflicting emotions at the same time.

A Discussion with Coca-Cola by Diane Hessan and Stan Sthanunathan (Read!) #TMRE #MRX

The Coca-Cola logo is an example of a widely-r...

Image via Wikipedia

Live blogs by @LoveStats of @Conversition. This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

***                                                                                                          ***

The 21st Century Market Researcher: A Discussion with Coca-Cola
Diane Hessan, President & CEO, Communispace
Stan Sthanunathan, Vice President, Marketing Strategy
& Insights, The Coca-Cola Company

  • The session starts with standing room only. Lines along the wall and the back of the room. You missed out! What does Stan worry about? What is his story? What’s right, what really matters for his organization.
  • Stan says he has no filter between his brain and his mouth. 🙂
  • Why MR? It wasn’t what his father wanted, he wanted him to be a doctor or an engineer. He hated engineering. He needed to correct it and he went to business school. He had an inspirational professor – organizational behavior professor and economics professor.
  • Why is Coke iconic? Community over hundred years. Everyone has a story about coke. And not just in Atlanta. 100 000 people in company and more in the bottling industry. They live and work in the community and touch people on a daily basis. It’s a drink that promotes happiness on a daily basis. 1.7 billion times a day.
  • What do they do next? Five by twenty. Five million empowered women by 2020 in Africa. Doesn’t mean computers on her desk. It means wheelbarrows, door to door selling. Some graduate to having a small truck. Either way, it puts food on the plate for women who didn’t have it before.
  • MR is best profession in world.
  • It is the most critical component before any meaningful decision. Challenge is inspiring people. Be a change agent.
    “Research quality doens’t matter” “We’re in the dark ages”
    Why is best profession in the world more boring, most youthless profession? Part of job is boring and won’t let you rise to challenges. You will never solve quality. Quality is table stakes. They don’t get us to glory.
  • Companies want insights function to cost everything. BORING. Processes don’t get glory for anyone.
  • Starting a ppt with methodology slides is probably not a good idea. We get stuck in fact filled presentations. Not fact full presentations.
  • Truth doesn’t mean facts with tons of numbers on the screen. Lots of data makes you look smart as opposed to communicating truths. You don’t need all the facts for that.Surveys aren’t dead. Ask people, they’ll give you answer. Are they telling you the truth? WHY would they tell you the truth? Surveys always have a role, a crucial role. But survey research measures the past. You don’t reach a destination by looking in the rearview mirror. How do we look ahead? Inspire people to look ahead. That is insight.
  • Insight is something that seems intuitive. BUT, did you know before I told you? Probably not. That’s insight.
    80% of budgets are rearview mirror. How do you change that? Surveys are like crack. You just can’t stop. If you can’t influence brand health in one month than why are you tracking it every month?
  • Why do we need gigantic sample sizes in every teeny country? Do you need tracking in every country, all 90 of them? If they aren’t going to be different, then focus tighter and you save money. Put that money into forward looking research.
  • 124 years ago, if we used current protocals, we would have never launched coke. Dark brown fizzy liquid with alien taste? No way. But someone had a vision and the rest is history. Create the future. Don’t just follow it.
  • Hire people who are not similar to who you already have. Not skin colour. Diversity of thinking. Anthropologists, etc. He did an interview where they talked about a girls involvement in the orchestra. She was best hire. She could tell a great story, great team player in orchestra, knows her role.
  • You don’t want people bobbing their head and agreeing with you. Then somebody is redundant. People need to disagree with reason. Doesn’t happen easily. People worry about getting fired and their promotions. It starts at the top. It’s ok to make your boss feel uncomfortable.
  • You can teach technical skills.
  • Make your rearview research look ahead. understand where people are headed as opposed to asking them.
  • What do you outsource? What do you NOT hire for? He hates process. He outsources process. Never outsource thinking. That will get you in trouble. Don’t think insular. Thinking takes time and you can’t do that if you’re worried about processing.
  • Predicting the future is based on the past, not where you want to go. Paint a picture of the future and find the road there.
  • Fundamental principles of rattling, shaking up the senior management – surprise, be proactive. What fact did you create for the day that made people’s jaw drop? Make people think about something in a new way. “Half a China” is the same as “700 million people per day” – That’s fact versus different concept.
  • Never underestimate the power of n=1.
  • Best research is where you immerse yourself personally. Ask employees. It will change the culture. Get audio and video from people on the floor. Use it. They become involved and they’ll love you for it.
  • Insight is just common sense, self-evident. AFTER it is told.
  • Changed your mind recently? Research is a journey.

 

Anthropological use of Mobile Tech by Mimi Ito #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats of @Conversition. This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

***                                                                                                          ***

An Anthropological Presentation of the Use of Mobile Tech & Digital

mobile phone text message

Image via Wikipedia

Media in Everyday Life
Mimi Ito, Professor in Residence, Department of Anthropology and Department of Informatics at the University of California, Irvine

  • When and how does diversity matter? Which young people are the influencers?
  • Friendship driven participation – most common practices, myspace, instant messaging switched to facebook and text messaging. managing status among friends, flirting, being popular.
  • Interest driven participation – kids who are marginal, seen as different, smarter, digital generation, creating youtube videos, mixing movies, not most common, it’s diversity, niche trends.
  • facebook is people you went to school with. tumblr is people you wish you went to school with.
  • online culture breaks down clearly between geeks and social centered world. [i’m on the geek side. and proud of it. 🙂 ]
  • Japan was first country to really have mobile internet. People went online because it was a way of sending text messages across platforms.
  • For youth, a mobile phone is a piece of private space.
  • Why were teen messages content free? R U Up? You rawk. Gnight. These messages are only about keeping a warm connection with someone. It’s a shared social space. Teens know you need to return a text within 20 minutes or apologize for being late.
  • Early adoption was led by guys but then it was taken over by girls, but not very different. But the forms of engagement were very different.
  • Networks moved away from the youth demographic. Moms and teachers are here now. We just saw a dip down in adoption by younger people. SM space is becoming old fogey for teenagers now.
  • Females text 30% more than males. Texting by teens if massively off the chart compared to all other age groups.
  • PC access to social networks is a bit flat but mobile access is massive
  • Pokemon arrived in the 90s. New adults now grew up with media. Second most successful franchise every (after mario). Trading cards followed. This media had more than good guy, bad guy, girl. it had hundreds of characters, ridiculously differentiated set of media. Invites collections, trading, social currency. There is flocking behavior, a common language. harder to participate, belong if you don’t have it.
  • It’s about creating content as well. strong connection with a franchise, sharing tips and cheats, sharing videos of games,
  • In the US, average player is 37, 42% are female, 45% of parents play with their kids weekly.
  • GREE is japan’s largest social network. Optimized for mobile. Centered around gameplay, avatars. Mobage is popular, Misi is losing popularity, Ameba is popular. newer sites are more mobile. Mobile is more popular because frequency of access is higher. Revenue model is based on virtual goods, subscriptions not ads.
  • In 2010, a portable console became the leading console, Nintendo DS.
  • Blacks and latinos are leading white and asian counterparts in growth/use of social media.
  • Price point of SmartSocialMobile is dropping to where majority of teens can afford it.
  • The typical teens don’t set the trends. It’s the geeks who do that. There are shared values around participating, engaging, but it is highly segmented because personalization is huge.
     

Art of Choosing By Sheena Lyenga #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats of @Conversition. This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

***                                                                                                          ***

The Art of Choosing
Sheena Iyengar, Author, The Art of Choosing

  • Why do we want choice, What affects how/what we choose, How can we get more from our choices
  • When she asks a questions, “Only raise your hand if you want to burn some calories” 🙂
  • “The narrowing down problem”; “The three by three rule”; “Pointy headed intellectual” – All refer to the jam problem – Does the model of offering so much choice work? 348 kinds of jam and they set up a tasting booth for 6 flavours of jam or 24 flavours of jam. When did people sample some jam? 24 samples.  When did people buy a jar of jam? 6 samples. 6 times more likely to buy a jar of jam if they encountered 6 jams.
  • What happens during the act of choice? Experiment – choose a chocolate from 6 or from 30. A chocolate from a selection of 30 was less delicious than one from the sample of 6 and they were more likely to choose a cash incentive rather than a chocolate incentive. More choice makes you think you’re losing out on something.
  • Choice overload reduces commitment. reduces decision quality. reduces satisfaction.
  • Causes of choice overload – cognitive limitations, remember the magical 7 + or – 2. Beyond 7, we get confused. Can’t remember much beyond 7.
  • Sometimes you like choice. That rare song, that rare CD. Experts can simplify and categorize so you are less prone to choice overload. Chess board isn’t individual pieces but lines of attack, patterns, dump irrelevant options and focus on relevant ones. Retail world is designed for experts.
  • In market for car? Focus on price, luggage space, sunroof, brings decision choice down. But we can’t do this in every area of our life. Cars don’t scale to wine or rock music.
  • Customers demand and expect more choice.
  • Manicures – would you go if they only offered 5 nail colour choices. No, you go only if they have 100 choices.Can you
    Sheena Iyengar

    Image via Wikipedia

    choose between two colours of pink that are practically identical. She brought the nail polish to her lab and her colleagues thought the colours were the same.

  • Cause #2 – differences between the options are so small we don’t know what our preferences are even though we feel that we ought to. We don’t want to randomly pick something. It’s not what I want or need. It’s supposed to say something about who we are. These choices refer to whoam I? Given who I am,what should i choose?
  • Choice is not a solitary activity. You never choose alone. Every act of choice is an act of communication. i send a message to you. I’m unique and you can related to me as an individual.
  • #3 Act of choosing is a high stakes enterprise. It needs to express our distinctiveness form everyone around us. We are obliged to be we free.
  • This is a problem for choice providers. But more choice confuses and overwhelms. you offer a better choosing experience. People want to know they chose the right one.
  • 3 techniques that work. Cut. Less is more. Don’t be afraid of cutting shelf space. It leads to increased sales. How do you know which one to cut? Don’t talk to the managers. Ask the employees. If employees don’t the differences, customers don’t either. Focus groups will tell you if consumers can tell the difference.
  • If they are different, make the different transparent. Categorize them. Make it simple. Label it. Give the details. It’s a low cost technique. We can handle more categories than choices. Magazine aisles are good example. People don’t know how many choices are in each section. More doesn’t feel like more variety. 6 categories and 2 choices (n=12) feels like more than 3 categories and 5 choices (n=30) Category names should be useful for the choosers.
  • #3 Condition for complexity. don’t throw kids into calculus unless then know the basics first. We can handle more choices if we do it one step at a time. Gradually increase the complexity.
  • Start with low decisions. First offer choice in areas where there is only 2 or 3 options to pick from. Gradually increase to where there are many options.  People are more satisfied in the end. I get to start easy, i’m easing into the category, i’m learning how to choose. I want to do it by the end.
  • Apple – 2 computers, 2 options for each. People like this.
  • Cut, categorize, condition
  • These will help decision making, competence and confidence in choice
  • Can you apply this to your work life? CEO does 139 tasks a week. Most have subchoices. 50% of decisions made in 9 minutes or less.
  • Exercise for the audience. Jot down all tasks of typical week. Start cutting. Which should be delegated, redundant, extraneous. Where is the reward for each task greater than the misery? Categorize them. Where can i contribute the most value add? Those are your main priorities. Strive for excellence here. Make sure it’s not more than three.
  • Be choosy about choosing.
     

Orlando Peabody Ducks Leaving the Fountain and Arriving at the Palace #TMRE

The Peabody hotel is known for their ducks. Duck soap, duck bathmats, duck artwork, duck everything. I kinda like it. In particular, they are known for a family of ducks that spends the day inside the hotel and then returns to a palace in the evening. The journeys to and from the fountain and palace are a daily adventure for guests, particularly those under three feet. And me. Enjoy the videos.




Vendor Freebies: Vote for your favourite! #TMRE #MRX

With over 1000 attendees and, what, I don’t know, 50 or more booths, there is certainly a lot for folks to bring home to their colleagues. Below are pictures of just SOME of the goodies that were available. Leave a comment and tell me which was your favourite, even if it’s not in the photos.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Leading Through Transformation, Anne Mulcahy #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats! This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

***                                                                                                          ***

KICKOFF KEYNOTE
3:00 PM – Leading a Transformation: The Role of Leadership & Insights
Anne Mulcahy, Former CEO, Xerox Corporation (Interviewed by Bill MacElroy)

  • Anne is involved with the Save the Children charity.
  • As a CEO what is the balance between intuition and quantitative data. Intuition is code for experience and talent. Coupled, rounded, shaped by customer data and insight. Polarization is never good. People are hampered by lack of intuition around data.  Best campaigns come with big idea that is intuitive but is shaped by research. Always impressed with IBM’s smart planet. As observer, it is a belief system about where opportunities will be.
  • Can you teach this?  It can be learned, not taught. Be a good listener, good learner, that can trump data. Sometimes, yield to the data.
  • What is role of research in discovering new things? It’s important. MR is not an insurance policy. That’s like leading the witness. Focus groups are often a validation than a challenge. [qualies just felt a pain in their chest] Don’t do overkill. Don’t say research is more than it is.
  • Technology and innovation are core. How innovative is MR? Creating customer value chain is very important. Innovation needs improvement, beyond just the MR component. Research shouldn’t be predictable answers to predicable questions. Richer role for MR in helping to provoke new ideas and opportunities. Mix the engineers and customers into “dreaming” sessions. What are your barriers to productivity?
  • Where did idea for dream sessions come?  They didn’t
    A small, much used Xerox photocopier in the li...

    Image via Wikipedia

    launch products, they escaped. 🙂 Original fax/print/scan machines didn’t sell well. Where did the design come from?  Don’t want to research the product. Want to research people. Brought in anthropologists. Research was painful but helped them intervene and solve problems. That was the beginning that pulled them out of the product spec world and into the people world.

  • Are researchers bold and forward with new ideas? We are often what our client wants us to be. Cautious client = cautious research. Client needs to value and not shoot the messenger. Dual responsibility. Create an environment where boldness is embraced and then let researchers step up to the plate.
  • We are drowning in data and starving for insights. This is the opportunity. We are driving in social media data. We need to be guided to actions. We don’t need a lot of things that were taken over by tech. We need judgment and thinking.
  • What are other data sources? Customers. This feeds experience intuition. Personal context is greater value when combined with quant. Your own people. These are your qual sources. Connect better. Listen better. Be a better receiver.  Your employees are your army. Employees can be more candid than consumers sometimes. They are an untapped source of data. And they realize how much they matter when you ask their opinions.
  • Would you ever hire a manager who didn’t believe in research? Probably not. We’ve done things this way for so many years. It’s ritual now. We need to challenge this whether research or engineering or any other area. Must respect fact base.  Challenge of methodology? for sure. Don’t hire a cynic but hire a skeptic.
  • Need leadership. It’s cultural. Reward and embrace different characteristics. Experimental. Invest in new approaches. Risk taking is hard to find.  This is how to break through. Never lose respect for quant. Don’t throw out fundamentals. Create integrated approach.
  • Do organizations like to learn? We get paid for expertise and learning is about not knowing. People need to be more comfortable with IDK answer.
  • Most valuable insight from research? Customer value from technology. Dreaming sessions. Tougher to differentiate on technology itself. I want more than hardware and if that’s it, price will be my answer. They needed to transform into a services industry. Be the best hardware or wrap tech into solutions. Moved from what they knew well to new territory.
  • Biggest dud because of research? Big ones never bombed because they were iterative. Research as insurance policy can be problematic.  You can’t say “i’m great” when the newspapers say you have problems. They went dark. No ads. Did nothing. For about two years while they cleaned up their act. people felt it was wrong at the time. Ads talking to other brands let them talk about themselves without talking about themselves.
  • How should research insulate itself from global problems to be a must have?  Research can help with prioritization. This is value creation. Good MR, quant and precision about how you use your resources. Don’t tell me to do it if i can’t act on it.
  • Is there an ROI on MR? Slippery slope. Need metrics. Good measurements. Err on the side of ROI. Research is one piece of the puzzle. Be accountable for metrics. Generate baseline measures. There isn’t a disciplined ROI.

BP Shopper Insights Neurometric Case Study #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats! This is a session summary from The Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

***                                                                                                          ***

2:15 – Engaging Fuel Consumers at the Street & the Pump: BP

Pay-at-the-pump gasoline pump in Indiana, Unit...

Image via Wikipedia

Shopper Insights Neurometric Case Study
EmSense and BP

  • 10000 British Petroleum gas stations and over 2 million consumers every day [BP is a great social media data quality case study – BP=blood pressure, basis points, brad pitt]
  • How do consumers interact with the gas station and visual elements. focus of what people do not what people say. [actions always speak louder than words]
  • What do people notice when they’re looking at gas stations as they drive down the street?
  • Recruited people once they arrived at the gas station so they could monitor the entire pumping experience. Needed equipment that function under varying degrees of naturalsunlight, uncontrolled lighting. Had to be able to move around.
  • Interested in cognition and emotion – easy/difficult/thinking vs like/hate [finally some methodology!]
  • Recruited several hundred people over 2 weeks. Took 20 minutes to complete each person’s gas pumping experience. Had to choose representative pumps because all the pumps are different.
  • Where do they while they pump? Right at the pump. Not at other cars. Not at the signage across the way. Pumps are quite tall and signs on top of the pump are out of site and people don’t look there. They look immediately around the price section of the pump.
  • Now a Drive-In study where you can’t hook people up with equipment. Apparently lawyers don’t like that. 🙂
  • What do drivers notice on approach? They showed videos of people approaching gas stations. Once they pass the station, people don’t think about that station anymore. Canopy tops are noted. Amenities are noticed. Price is noted. “Light approaches” are  missed [I don’t know what that is.]
  • Had people drive in to the station.  Did they noticeanything? The more cluttered pump caused confusion. The less busy pump was more enjoyable. Consumer ratings confirmed those results. Consumers want a clean station.
  • [Love how the new methods validate existing methods and identify parts where we thought wrong. See? One method does not fit all. And, one method’s results should not transfer identically.]
%d bloggers like this: