Tag Archives: segmentation

From Bumbling Dad to Human Being: How advertisers are finally giving dads their due

This post originally appeared on the Sklar Wilton & Associates blog.

As a kid, my dad played catch with me every day after work in the summer, took me to swimming lessons every weekend in the winter, made me wiener soup for lunch when my mom spent a day doing her own thing, and spent hours with me picking elective classes in highschool (history, because I was going to be the next Indiana Jones). I personally can’t relate to the bumbling dads portrayed in ads I watched growing up.

To a far greater extent five and ten years ago, men have been portrayed as incompetent fathers who couldn’t properly feed a child or do simple cleaning tasks around the home. That historical model in the marketing space used to match some segments in real life such that it made no sense to extend parental leave to dads – it was presumed that dads couldn’t take care of the kids and the home anyways. It made no sense to strive for equality in the workplace when there seemed to be none in the home. As the saying going, you cannot do what you cannot see.

However, a study released by Statistics Canada shows that men’s roles in the family have changed starkly over the last forty years, particularly in terms of how many dads are stay-at-home dads. Compared to 1976 when stay-at-home-dads were 1 in 70 of all stay-at-home parent families, today that number is 1 in 10. If you consider households where the mom is employed, nearly 11% of dads today are the caregivers compared to only 1.4% forty years ago (see chart). It’s a consistent trend across all of Canada. If they ever truly were bumbling dads, dads today are regular human beings doing regular child-rearing and home case activities. Dads are changing diapers, buying groceries, cooking meals, cleaning toilets, and are viable audiences and target groups for pretty much every product category. These are all real spaces for companies to grow their business simply by reaching out to their current audience, not just their historical audience.

Advertising leaders in the United Kingdom also have a hard time relating to the stereotype of the bumbling dad and they have decided to do something about it. The Advertising Standards Authority released a report exploring harm arising from media gender stereotypes that “relate to body image, objectification, sexualisation, gender characteristics and roles, and mocking people for not conforming to gender stereotypes.” The organization intends to create new standards for ads that incorporate stereotypical behaviours. For instance, ads that might not meet the new standards include those that:

  • Depict family members creating a mess while a woman has the sole responsibility for cleaning it up.
  • Suggest that an activity is inappropriate for a girl because it is stereotypically associated with boys or vice versa.
  • Feature a man trying and failing to undertake simple parental or household tasks

In another initiative, Unilever, UN Women, Mars, and Alibaba have bound together in the ‘Unstereotype Alliance’ to do their part to stop stereotypical portrayals of gender in advertising. In their research , Unilever’s chief marketing and communications Officer Keith Weed notes that progressive ads are 25% more effective and deliver “better branded impact.”

It’s been truly heartwarming to see brands plan for this change and make huge strides in response to the evolution of gender roles. Over the last couple of years, brands have begun to make great efforts to ensure their ads are more representative of the current population, They are focusing more on the way things really are today as opposed to taking the easy way out by using the stereotypes that have existed for innumerable decades.

When it comes to gender, and dads in particular, newer ads have begun to focus on men and dads not as lazy, ignorant bystanders or handsome supermodels with ripped abs, but rather as equal partners taking on their share of responsibilities in the home, and as human beings who genuinely care about the other people in their lives. Newer ads present dads in a manner that reflect today’s reality. Dads who don’t have time to go to the gym every day because they’re taking kids to hockey practices, piano lessons, and library sessions. Dads who turn on the oven and feed the kids while mom puts her feet up after a long day behind the welding visor.

Tide has fully embraced this trend with its television commercials. For instance, in this commercial, though mom and dad are packing suitcases together, it’s the dad who is first to speak up and take action when his daughter, and then his son, needs some last minute laundry done.

This Motts Fruitsations commercial shows a dad taking on the grocery shopping duties. Not only is he caring for his baby at the same time as every mom has always does, he is fully aware of what his other children are up over the rest of the week including their karate and gymnastics classes, and sleepovers.

This Dove commercial shows many dads including their young children, both boys and girls, in a huge range of non-stereotypical activities. From dancing with them in front of the TV, gleefully terrifying them in a plane or race car, pushing their wheelchair through a skateboard park, or saving them from crashing after a fall, these dads share joy and passion with their young ones regardless of whether ‘girls do that’ or ‘boys do that.’

And, if you need something to wipe away the tears and put some fun into your soul, enjoy this last commercial from Ikea. The young boy is clearly disappointed when he tells his dad that mom cooked macaroni all week. And of course, dad saves the day with a beautifully prepared meal. You’ll just have to watch the rest of the ad to see the conclusion!

I quite love these new portrayals of dads in the media. It’s a great reminder that stereotypes don’t always reflect current trends. Sometimes you need to really push beyond tradition to reach the broader set of your consumers. If you’d like cast aside stereotypes and find out who your consumers of today are, we’d love to help you. Please get in touch!

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This post was written in my role as a consultant for Sklar Wilton & Associates. SW&A has worked for more than 30 years with some of Canada’s most iconic brands to help them grow their brand, shape corporate culture, build successful innovation, define portfolio strategies, and maximize research ROI. They offer strategic advice, business facilitation, research management, qualitative/quantitative research, and analytics. SW&A was recognized as a Great Workplace for Women in 2018, and the Best Workplace in Canada for Small Companies in 2017 by the Great Place To Work® Institute. Inquire about their services here.

 

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The evolution of insights: practicing what we preach: 6 summaries #IIeX #MRX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in amsterdam. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Power of human intelligence in the new era – man and the machine by Simon Edward and Seda Tokcan, (IBM)

  • Our personal lives have blurred, it’s an always on world, a do it yourself mentality prevails
  • Expertise still drives world progress, but what is the role of expertise
  • There are barriers associated with building expertise in the new digital era
  • Even simple analytics are not straightforward 
  • Human cognitive capacity is inadequate compared to what is required in today’s digital world
  • Advances are ushering in a new era of computing, no more punchcards, no more simply programming, now we’re in cognitive systems era
  • To error is human but to really mess things up requires a computer, now computers can learn and build expertise
  • What is so unique about human intelligence, ability to create a novel idea, ability to differentiate between causality and correlation, ability to combine intuitions with intelligence, ability to ask questions
  • The essence of being human is asking questions, not answering questions
  • Technology boosts the expertise of intelligence professionals – enhance, scale and accelerate expertise
  • computer system confirmed 99% of medical diagnosis but added diagnosis precision to 30% of them
  • Think of technology as an enabler, let it cut through the ego and bias of humans

Automation: Robot vs Researcher by Paul Albert (Zappistore) and Tony Costello (RB)

  • WHat used to take 6 months is now being done in hours and TV marketing budgets have gone up
  • Research budgets are continuing to decline for three years in a row
  • In fifteen years, half of Fortune 500 companies have disappeared
  • Data and digital requires more research to fuel profit, Netflix and uber have grown immensely but TASI and blockbuster are dying
  • We need lower cost and more speed but we also need validated methodologies
  • Do you delay until the method os fully validated or launch Asap
  • Business that don’t adopt technology are destined to fail, bravery is need to adopt new approaches
  • Now they can test many more ads for more brands and chose more effective ads

System 1 Driven Brand Insights by CHristian Ohm (Magda) and Karthik Posnanski (BrainJuicer)

  • Mazda has rebounded because of the product line, youngest
  • They moved from lower premium and generic to more premium and distinctive, premium experience not high price
  • Have a strong product perception but a weak brand image perception, most brands don’t
  • Fragmentation leads to a weak brand, in message or tone, sounds like a different brand in different markets
  • Took a co-creation approach, more people than marketing need to understand the brand – call Center, dealer, sales person
  • People knew the brands and could talk about them but there isn’t a lot of emotion but some people just love driving and are passionate about it, they want to deliver on this experience
  • Spirit of Hiroshima – challenger attitude, never give up, we can do it
  • Emotional connection is achieved when care and driver are in perfect harmony
  • Created a brand book to share with everyone
  • Tracking needs to be fast and actionable, cover emotions, simple and engaging, modular and flexible, adapt latest MR thinking, forward focused and predictive, strategic and tactical, more qualitative [excellent advice for research in general]
  • Considered fame, feeling, and fluency for brand growth

The nature of consumer emotion by Aaron Reid

  • Visceral factors theory – Lowenstein, falling asleep at the wheel – extreme deviation from a desired equilibrium point
  • It was a bold man who first ate an oyster – well, maybe a crazy person or simply a very hungry person
  • System 1 ans system 2 interact, it can’t be one or the other
  • The proportion of emotion model combines emotion and reason in a single predictive algorithm, we are more accurate in predictions if we use both
  • You can’t measure racism explicitly, emotion interacts with reason
  • We see eye tracking and emotion tracking of the Budweiser immigration ad, can see attention in the right places and emotion being positive or negative at the right moments
  • Adding implicit facial coding and implicit impact of ads greatly increases ability to predict virality of an ad
  • Need to quantify the emotions from pride, gratitude, and anxiety

Unilever’ innovation in action by Vijay Raj (unilever), @vijayiraj

  • They engaged with startups so they could increase the work with half the cost, half the time and better quality
  • Have worked with 800 startups in recent years – the Shark Tank, piloted 200, recruited 30 for research and the new way of doing business
  • Want to move away from asking to observing, people forget, they give estimates (not because they’re lying)
  • Used google glass technology and advanced video analytics
  • Move from asking to sensing, though people struggle to articulate emotions, FMRI, emotion coding, facial coding, they use facial coding on every ad
  • Why should we ask at all? Asking reveals needs, combine what people search for on google with what people say on social media to replace traditional research
  • Move from studying consumers to building relationships with people
  • The technology enables them to string together a more powerful story
  • Let’s move to “i have the answer what is your question’
  • The pyramid of tomorrow: Input powered by tech, output enabled by tech, outcome delivered by people
  • Make the leap from insights to ideas
  • They pay their vendors bonuses if they do a job well [fabulous idea, will you do this?]

Integrating new data sources to improve the value of your segmentation research by Hilary DeCamp (LRW)

  • Can you buy an ad for a segment?
  • Geolocation, attitudinal profiles, likely voters
  • Need to use machine learning and targeting to buy thousands of direct targeted ads
  • Microsegmentation has its use but you still need to use classic segmentation for higher level needs
  • Alternative lenses for segmentation – demographics are targetable in media, behaviors for usage styles of path to purchase, attitudes for believes about category or self, needs for key buying factors, occasion based for needs that vary by occasion
  • Right now demographics and behavior segmentation are highly used
  • Challenges with segmenting – surveys are too long and phones are too small, we don’t know what we don’t know, self report behavioural data is not very accurate or precise, targeting segments is hard to do in advertising
  • Can profile based on quantative data but people are bad with numbers, qualitative research brings richness and texture, plus can add real world behaviours like actual online activities or models propensities
  • Audiences are identified and you can message them differently by segment
  • The new tools are making classic segmentation more actionable than ever before

Jobs to be Done: A Roadmap for Customer-Centered Innovation by Stephen Wunker, New Markets Advisors

Live note-taking at the November 10, 2016, webinar. Any errors are my own.

  • People aren’t just buying products or services, they are trying to get things done, many ways to get these things done
  • How can we sell more ice cream? No calories, better distribution. Now think about you personally the last time you had ice cream, why did you have it? Completely different answers, nice way to end the evening, bribe the kids, want to cool down after a run, playgrounds, coffee, cigarettes, beer are the competition. It’s not an ice-cream company and the competition is much broader.
  • Can do job quicker and faster because you’re more targeted on what needs to be done
  • Need to know why consumers prioritize certain jobs and why they buy the things they buy
  • When: understand target markets fully and meet the needs of multiple stakeholders
  • How: address root causes and specific use cases
  • Why: broad solution space base don both functional and emotional insights
  • Discover the jobs, what do stakeholders want to accomplish, what are the pain points and current approaches but don’t start there are you will miss the why
  • Identify the success criteria and investigate the obstacles, go into detailed planning
  • Assess the value and beat the competition, do NOT start by trying to beat the competition
  • Credit card company – are you in the ‘gold card’ segment? Not very sophisticated. Add demographics which isn’t much better. Maybe go further with ten life-stage segments (college students, couple with baby) but this is not all that predictive for a gold credit card. Company really wanted to attract high spenders – business travelers, small business owners who put business charges on personal cards, these are very different people. Not everyone is seeking more even though that’s what we’re trying to give them. Business travelers might want instead preferential events so they can connect with their family at home.
  • Toothpaste – satisfies a very specific job. Is Wisp the worst toothbrush? It’s hardly a toothbrush at all. But it’s a huge category success. Has a very clear view of the customer. People who travel during the day and it’s hard to brush your teeth when you’re away, don’t want to carry a wet toothbrush. You don’t need a dental hygiene cleaning, you need to make sure there’s no broccoli in your teeth. Can’t be bulky. Have to be okay with throwing it away. [Darn, they almost had me until I heard it’s disposable]
  • Décor Aid redefined the norm by focusing on hundreds or low thousands of dollars clients, not hundreds of thousands. Value of freshening a living room before a party. Give you a newly interesting den. No obvious competition other than DIY and maybe it looking like DIY.
  • Go from big to narrow, get more targeted over time.
  • Case study – prepared food company expanding product portfolio. Functional job – budget, nourish, reduce time on menial tasks, eat healthy. Emotional job – unwind, bond, try new things, variety, demonstrate caring, express creativity. Makes more sense to start with the emotional jobs in this case – “feed yourself” isn’t very useful. Success criteria – tasty, filling, healthy, easy, fresh, variety. Obstacles – lack of energy, lack of ideas, distractions, cravings, timing. There are industry benchmarks and you have to be prepared to break those so you can stand alone a bit. Myth – couples want quick meals is more correctly couples want easy meals.
  • Jobs To Be Done goes different than needs or features. It’s only one piece of understanding the market. Don’t compete on features.
  • Map the entire process of customer behaviour and keep digging to get a root causes. Be a kindergartner and keep asking why why why. Create a hierarchy of stakeholder jobs and priorities. Satisfy both functional and emotional jobs.
  • Get out of the conference room and talk to actual people. people have a hard time telling you these kinds of things on a questionnaire. You can quantify context and experience, you can ask about frequencies. And then qualitative gives you the full experience
  • Two segments is probably too simplistic and too many is unreasonable. Direct mail gives you more options for more segments. 4 to 7 is probably a good balance to exploit richness of the world but not getting over detailed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research effectiveness award finalists #ESOMAR #MRX 

Live blogged at Esomar in Dublin. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Driving success through big data segmentation

  • Australia affected by the global financial crisis, growth rate almost stopped, increase in unemployment, reduced household wealth
  • GE consumers were trying to pay off their debt balances, also high losses
  • needed to identify the new norm, how did consumers feel after this crisis, can we build a segmentation
  • success factors were driving cultural transformation, fine tune value proposition
  • needed to engage senior stake holders, involve agency partners at every step
  • did an audit of GE’s customer data
  • two samples, 3000 people around australia, 5000 people from GE database, link the two together
  • what is the new norm?
  • australians felt destabalized, the signs weren’t good, felt vulnerable, pessimistic, uncertain about the future
  • they wanted control over whatever they could, they could control their spending, new norm was to live within your means
  • needed a unique GE segmentation that lived on the GE database
  • don’t sit back once the research is underway
  • used videos, handbooks, training packs, reference desk stands
  • everyone knows the target segments and understands them
  • they saw actual change as a result – different people could talk to each other and understand each other
  • net promoter score went up 5 points [cue all the NPS isn’t enough arguments]
  • saw improved sales measures, increases in sales, this led to them training the entire company on segmentation
  • essential to have senior management endorsement
  • essential to have committment to change, high quality research agencies, education, communication, make outcomes tangible by putting numbers on the outcomes

Reinventing convenience store food

  • [huge fan of the 7/11 slurpee! woot!]
  • 620 stores in australia, all franchised, 1.5 billion annually, 6 customers per second
  • how to become a destination for food on the go
  • it wasn’t in decline, but they did make it grow
  • did a knowledge audit with many stakeholders
  • did a qual phase with real people, took them on a bus to various stores
  • also did a quant phase with 1000 people
  • 3 key things: shoppers trust quality and freshness, customers prefer no service, customers see it as fast food
  • hot food still rated high on trust but not as high as chips and candy
  • but people didn’t think the store was fun or attractive, looked bland, no sense of discovery
  • nailed efficiency but not the experience [yup, if I wanted to talk to restaurant staff, I’d go to hungry jack]
  • people want to be left alone in the store – anonymity, no judgement, freedom, naughty fun, gives them control and flexibility with flavours and additives
  • on a survey, they ranked with burger king, subway, kfc, hungry jack as a fast food store – they both offer real meals – i.e., a meal is a chocolate bar, chips and a pop [LOL yeah, i get it 🙂 ]
  • each meal has different marketing needs, needed to build craving for lesser known products
  • growing in appeal and affinity in this category finally
  • [This is my choice as the winner, hope you win!]

Using survey data to target customers and increase ROI through digital media

  • conversion model to identify consumers willing to spend more on your brand
  • survey of 10 000 travelers of 7 brands of holiday inn brands, about 2200 open to staying at holiday inn in the future
  • [quite the sales pitch here. you can ALWAYS discuss a product without making it a sales pitch 😦 ]
  • scaled 2200 travels into 15 million travels with a look alike model of internet behaviour
  • four outside companies played a role in creating ads, tagging and measuring the campaign, purchasing the audience
  • 500% increase in bookings
  • [didn’t get to see a model 😦 ]

Neuro to Big Data to Segmentation: Multi-mode wins #ESOMAR #MRX

esomarLive blogging from #ESOMAR Congress 2014 in Nice, France. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Car Clinics 3.0: Designing better cars by peering into the consumers brains by Fatima El-khatib, haystack International, Belgium, Ronny Pauwels, Toyota Motor Europe, Belgium, Wim Hamaekers, haystack International, Belgium

  • Something didn’t feel right about a car they were test driving, but they didn’t quite know what
  • How do you measure the unconscious? Combine qual quant and something new, neuromarketing
  • Customers don’t say what they do and they don’t do what they say. So why ask them everything.
  • Protypes were highly confidential so couldn’t use them. Had to use older available materials.
  • EEG captures long term engagement and relevance, based on avoidance and approach theory
  • Lab test showed computer generated images, 5 views of the exterior, 8 views of the interior, film was about 3 minutes
  • People liked the wheels of one vehicle but not much else. For the other vehicle, everything was fine and average.
  • Because of biometric results, focused on the specific positive and negative features
  • Verbal results shows little differences between the vehicles but EEG showed one vehicle had much more positive feelings. Could see the specific details that people were not able to express verbally.
  • What about asking people about the fabric and dashboard ornaments.
  • VW Polo and Hyundai ornaments performed well but Citroen and Peugeot 208 performed awful based on Galvanic Skin Response.
  • Consumers have difficulty expressing everything verbally. Overall engagement doesn’t matter, it’s all the individual elements that matter. Even the tiniest details of a car can have a huge effect.
  • Neuro is now an official tool for Toyota. They look at the same business questions from different angles. It helps to optimize the car development process.
  • Neuro is not the holy grail – multi-mode is the holy grail. You still need experimental research designs.
  • Be brave, be daring, use the new techniques and see if/which ones add value.

Communication Analytics: Effectiveness Research for Conversion Based Campaign Planning:  How to measure effects of (offline) campaigns on web visits sales and conversion by Erik Prins, Validators, Netherlands
Iris van Dam, Validators, Netherlands, Martin Leeflang, Validators, Netherlands, Sander Pot, Ticketveiling, Netherlands

  • “Moneyball” with Brad Pitt is all about big data. Baseball is all statistics. Used all the statistics to put together an unlikely team that came second place in the end. Cost per player was $250 000 when other teams paid 2.5 million per player.
  • Can we do money ball in a media campaign.
  • Can you correlate campaigns and web visitors, sales, and conversion. Of course. Can calculate cost per anything – media, shopper, clicks.
  • Know the media schedules by the minute, TV, radio, everything. Know all sales, new and old customers.
  • Import all this data into one platform. Calculate cost per mille – how much to reach one thousand people. Cost per sales, cost per shopper, cost per click.
  • Calculate how many people visited website after commercials over an entire year – It cost 0.25E to get someone to their website for one specific channel. Another channel ended up at 12E per customer.  The time of day matters, midday was so much cheaper.
  • Online is winning in Netherlands because they can measure views and clicks.
  • Outdoor advertising is activating existing customers. For new clients, you need TV and radio. Online media is more expensive
  • For Ticketveiling, the win it midday programming. Outdoor format was highway signs. Radio target was a few very specific channels.  Don’t burst all your funds at once, drip your funds is much cheaper.
  • There is less need for traditional research now, need to shift into research consulting, and clients understand this more.

New Perspectives: How a segmentation provided new ways of looking at consumers thereby unlocking sales potential by Alastair Liptrot, Simplot, Australia, Neale Cotton, The Lab Strategy & Planning, Australia, Paul Labagnara, The Lab Strategy & Planning, Australia, Peter Stuchberry, Nature Research, Australia

  • Start somewhere different if you want to end up somewhere different. Try starting at the end. How will you apply your research in the end?
  • Invest your money in a safe bank or lose it all at a casino. Or invest it in a segmentation [I much prefer the segmentation option 🙂 ]
  • Simplot is products in Australia in the freezer, to chiller, to house
  • Normally small packs, large packs, kiddie packs. Need to look beyond demographics
  • Most don’t have longevity or are only demo based, and may not complement existing tools or data.
  • Had to work with current categories and brands, as well as future brands.
  • developed four pillars – involvement – how much you love cooking 2) health 3) convenience 4) value
  • Decided on 8 segment model.
  • used Nielsen homescan – people who scan all their supermarket purchases. tagged everyone with a segment, used personality, demographics
  • Had to inspire the team to embrace the segmentation. Need to make the people feel a part of it, encourage acceptance and engagement. Had them engage from the very beginning. Include them in naming the segments so they truly understand what the segments are.  Created a game show for the marketing team to better understand the segments and how to use them.
  • Delivered 30 million in revenue for a $250000 investment
  • The project would have gone on the shelf if they hadn’t though about how they would use it in the end

Perfecting Social Media Segmentation: Margie Strickland #CASRO #MRX

casrobanner
… Live blogging from beautiful San Francisco…

 

Perfecting Over-Done Social Media Segmentation

By Margie Strickland, Vice President, Measurement Science, Symphony Advanced Media

  • Is advertising more effective if you target social media influencers
  • There is no standard on what influence is though, are they influences in only one place, do they consumer other media the same as other people
  • People installed an app that listened to the surroundings for 20 seconds every minute to match up what TV you were watching
  • The talker is the influencer but the listener should not be overlooked as they may be sleeping giants. This app is helpful for listening to the listeners
  • Evaluate reach, how often you post, reactions to those posts
  • Social movers have lots of comments, not a lot of messages but those gets lots of comments; fewest people are here; TV viewing behaviour was different; share brand posts frequently, share friends posts; clearly different from the other three groups [would have like to know HOW they are different in terms of what they watch on TV – sport shows? reality shows? news shows?]
  • Actively liked have lots of likes and lots of messages and lots of conversations; most people are here
  • Reservers have lots of friends; third largest group
  • Listeners are low on everything, just lurking, look at friends photos; second largest group

Better way to Use Segmentation by YUM!, TNS, and Taco Bell #TMRE #MRX

Live blogs by @LoveStats! This is a session summary from The

The classic Taco Bell logo used from 1985 to 1...

Image via Wikipedia

Market Research Event by IIR in Orlando, Florida, November 2011. It was posted mere minutes after completion of the talk. Any inaccuracies are my own. Any humorous side remarks are also my own. Feel free to leave comments and critiques.

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8:00 – A Better Way to Use Segmentation for Strategic Product

Planning & to Drive Innovation
Debra Kassarjian, Director, Customer Experience, YUM Brands
John Essegian, EVP Client Service, TNS

  • Wanted to develop a new menu architecture. It was time for an update. Where were the innovation opportunities.
    HARNESS THE POWER!  [Buzzword bingo 🙂 ]
  • Need to get the information and how to activate it
  • Great segmentation integrates brand, consumer,competitive landscape to  identify gaps; holistic; living document
  • It is NOT target user groups in isolation; a tracker with brand ratings; put it on the shelf
  • Most common downfalls – only identified segments, not linked to opportunities, not at product level; can’t communicate them, lack of organizational structure to bring to life
  • 2001 – no innovation, test market was 50/50 successful, no up-front insights, too much spent on product testing
  • Needed more comprehensive approach to developing new products; melting cheese on everything doesn’t cut it 🙂  [although that does work for me]
  • Started with 2 hours indepth interviews and projective techniques, make people talk about QSR in a way they never have [now @Zebrabites is listening]
  • Take qual work into quant work
  • Used cluster analysis, factor analysis, no magic there [shocking, most people like to think their analysis is unique when it really isn’t 🙂 ]
  • Thought they had “big” covered but they didn’t; restructured so they had a pillar focusing on this area; they had focused on flavours not world of big and meaty and humungous
  • They went barhopping and restaurant visiting with menand their friends
  • Developed 4 to 5 years of pipeline out of this one area
  • Why go to Taco Bell? Sit and stay, waiting for paycheck, on the go, only the best meat, hungry man, fresh and tasty; these create a lot of profile information – demographics, visit motivators
  • Plotted 56 of their menu items to see role and where there are gaps
  • “Live life large” Big fun, big events, big food
  • Led to Triple Steak, 5 buck box, L chalupa, volcano menu, fully loaded nachs; Their ads focus on how huge the food is.
  • [I think everyone wants Taco Bell for lunch after seeing a series of ads focusing on “Big”]
  • They realized they didn’t move fast enough on some of stages – snackwrap, quality. They still need to do beverages, breakfasts, hispanic needs
  • Success rate in 2010 was 80%, consumer based ideas, 90% success at height of program [Now THAT is increased ROI!]
  • Then she moved to Pizza Hut where the situation was the same. 50% success rate at beginning and they had to start all over

Richards and Bland: Audience Segmentation, American Cancer Society #MRA_AC #MRX

American Cancer Society

Image via Wikipedia

Session summary of the Marketing Research Association 2011 annual conference. These are my interpretations of the session. They were written during the session and posted immediately afterwards. Any inaccuracies and silliness are my own.


Using Audience Segmentation for Event Growth
Melanie Richards, Ph.D., American Cancer Society, Inc.
Alex Bland, American Cancer Society, Inc.

  • American Cancer Society – Official sponsor of birthdays
  • Help people stay well, communicate information, find cures though own research and funding research, help people fight back through advocacy and empowering volunteers –> do this through events, Relay for Life, Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, DetermiNation
  • DetermiNation – prepare athletes for endurance events, as they train they raise money to fight cancer
  • Problem – Needed to identify right audience for program, motivations, demographics, psychographics, behaviours for people interested/supporting endurance event. Not trying to convince new people.
  • Approach – create a set of persona groups.
    Segmentation was used. E.g., Best Buy sets up stores differently depending on the geolocation, some have cell phones at the front, some have movies at the front
  • Started with a survey – past and future participation, motivations, awareness, 1500 completes. Used clustering and Bayesian algorithm. (Ha! Crazy hard math)
  • Created 5 personas, must be culturally inclusive, segments are generalized ideas not exact descriptions. (Would have liked to see the personas. 😦  )
  • (Latercomer Dan Womack took the obstructed seat behind the column. We all laughed at him.)
  • Decided to target 3 personas all of which were high income folks who generate more donations. Developed 1 communication that spoke to aspects of all 3.
  • First develop creative materials and ad testing. Then they tested tthe creative on the three personas. Started with bulletin board focus groups. Moved to online focus group. Then did flash polls. (See multi-method style here)
  • Winning ad is similar to: If you can run you can run further; If you can train you can train harder; If you do you can fight cancer
  • Wanted to use the data for more than just the creative. Apply personas back to original constituent database to communicate to them better and develop better event experience.
  • Lessons learned: Discuss important variables ahead of time. Choose variables that matter to you. Learn the next steps that will make the results immediately actionable. (Oh yeah!)
  • It’s never going to be perfect (We need to hear that a lot more.)
  • (Have you sponsored an ACS athlete today?)

What’s Your Twitter Segment?

On several occasions now, I’ve come across a comment like, “Everyone on Twitter is smarter/funnier/more dedicated/better than I am.” I even saw a tweet from someone who said something like, “I go to Store ABC because the people on Twitter make me feel dumb.”

Well, if you stop and think about it, the only people you CHOOSE to follow (ignoring courtesy follows) on Twitter are the people you either:

  1. admire,
  2. want to learn from,
  3. want to laugh from,
  4. have similar interests, or
  5. have some commonality with you that prevents you from turning off the follow.

Also think about this, do you follow people who bore you, have a stupid sense of humour, say stupid things? I doubt it. You tune those people out as fast as you can. This means you end up with a finely tuned group of people who make you happy, people who choose the best of their witty remarks, the best of their smart remarks, and the best of all the random junk that’s passing through their brain. It’s a very personalized self-determined segmentation. In my case, it means I follow:

  1. researchers,
  2. gardeners,
  3. birders,
  4. bakers,
  5. online icons, and
  6. a bit of random silliness.

Those are my segments. In the end, these leaves you with a very skewed representation of who is on Twitter. You’re only seeing what you want to see, and it’s dang hard to see what you can’t see. Again, in my case, it seems like everyone on Twitter loves research and works in a professional setting. So, forget that nonsense about how much better or worse people on Twitter are and enjoy what it offers you.

And if you’re interested, here’s what my Twitter interest profile looks like, thanks to Wordle. (Hi Tom!)

twitgroups

 

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  • Consumer Segmentation Gone Wrong

    Don’t get me wrong. I know why they do it. Company’s want to make sure that when someone visits their website, the site is as relevant as possible. They want to ensure that what you see on their website is what you’ll see in the store. But, things have gone just a bit too far for me. For instance, Home Depot won’t even let me look at their website unless I tell them my zip code. Are they not aware that zip codes are PII (personally identifiable information)? They don’t even give you an option to see a generic site. Your only option is to lie, something I’m completely against given I am an expert in survey data quality. So basically, when I shop around, I don’t end up buying at Home Depot.
    HDsegment

    Here’s another example. Cheerios won’t let me look at their site unless I tell them my age and how old my children are. Sure, I could just choose one of the four sites that I think would be most interesting, but dang it, I just want to see their website. Where’s the generic site for people who want to maintain some sense of privacy, the site where people know their demos aren’t being tracked? Nowhere that I see.
    cheersegment
    Segmentation is a great tool. It lets you understand people better and provide better services. But please, don’t segment me out of your store. Unless you don’t want my money.

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