Tag Archives: scale

Analysis, design, and sampling methods #PAPOR #MRX 

Live blogged at #PAPOR in San Francisco. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Enhancing the use of Qualitative Research to Understand Public Opinion, Paul J. Lavrakas, Independent Consultant; Margaret R. Roller, Roller Research

  • thinks research has become to quantitative because qual is typically not as rigorous but this should and can change
  • public opinion in not a number generated from polls, polls are imperfect and limited
  • aapor has lost sight of this [you’re a brave person to say this! very glad to hear it at a conference]
  • we need more balance, we aren’t a survey research organization, we are a public opinion organization, our conference programs are extremely biased quantitative
  • there should be criteria to judge the trustworthyness of research – was it fit for purpose
  • credible, transferable, dependability, confirmability
  • all qual research should be credible, analyzable, transparent, useful
  • credible – sample representation and data collection
  • do qual researchers seriously consider non-response bias?
  • credibility – scope deals with coverage design and nonresponse, data gathering – information obtained, researcher effects, participant effects
  • analyzability – intercoder reliability, transcription quaity
  • transparency – thick descriptions of details in final documents

Comparisons of Fully Balanced, Minimally Balanced, and Unbalanced Rating Scales, Mingnan Liu, Sarah Cho, and Noble Kuriakose, SurveyMonkey

  • there are many ways to ask the same question
  • is it a good time or a bad time? – fully balanced
  • is it a good time or not? – minimally balanced
  • do you or do you not think it is getting better?
  • are things headed in the right direction?
  • [my preference – avoid introducing any balancing in the question, only put it in the answer. For instance: What do you think about buying  a house? Good time, Bad time]
  • results – effect sizes are very small, no differences between the groups
  • in many different questions tested, there was no difference in the formats

Conflicting Thoughts: The Effect of Information on Support for an Increase in the Federal Minimum Wage Level, Joshua Cooper & Alejandra Gimenez, Brigham Young University, First Place Student Paper Competition Winner

  • Used paper surveys for the experiment, 13000 respondents, 25 forms
  • Would you favor or oppose raising the minimum wage.
  • Some were told how many people would increase their income, some were told how many jobs would be lost, some were told both
  • Negative info opposed a wage increase, positive info in favor of wage increase, people who were told both opposed a wage increase
  • independents were more likely to say don’t know
  • negatively strongly outweighs the good across all types of respondents regardless of gnder, income, religion, partyID
  • jobs matter, more than anything
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Direction of response scales #ESRA15 #MRX 

Live blogged at #ESRA15 in Reykjavik. Any errors or bad jokes in the notes are my own.

I discovered that all the buildings are linked indoors. Let it rain, let it rain, i don’t care how much it rains….  [Feel free to sing that as loud as you can.] Lunch was Skyr, oat cookies and some weird beet drink. Yup. I packed it myself. I always try to like yogurt and never really do. Skyr works for me. So far, coconut is my favourite. I’ve forgotten to take pictures of speakers today so let’s see if I can keep the trend going! Lots of folks in this session so @MelCourtright and I are not the only scale geeks out there . 🙂

Response scales: Effects of scale length and direction on reported political attitudes

  • instruments are not neutral, they are a form of communication
  • cross national projects use different scales for the same question so how do you compare the reuslts
  • trust in parliament is a fairly standard question for researchers and so makes a good example
  • 4 point scale is most popular but it is used up to 11 points, traditional format is very positive to very negative
  • included a don’t know in the answer options
  • transformed all scales into a 0 to 1 scale and evenly distributed all scores in between
  • means highest with 7 point scale traditional direction and lowest with 4 point and 11 point traditional direction
  • reverse direction had much fewer mean differences, essentially all the same
  • four point scales show differences in direction, 7 and 11 point show fewer differences in direction
  • [regression results shown on the screen – no one fainted or died, the speaker did not apologize or say she didn’t understand them. interesting difference compared to MRX events.]

Does satisficing drive scale direction effects

  • research shows answers shift towards the start fo the scale but this is not consistent
  • achoring and adjustment effects whereby people use the first answer option as the anchor, interpretative heuristics suggest people choose an early response to express their agreement with the questions, primacy effects due to satisficing decreases cognitive load
  • scores were more positive when the scale started positive, differences were huge across all the brands
  • the pattern is the same but the differences are noticeable
  • speeding measured as 300 milliseconds per word
  • speeders more likely to choose early answer option
  • answers are pushed to the start of the scale, limited evidnce that it is caused by satisficing

Ordering your attention: response order effects in web-based surveys

  • primacy happens more often visually and recency more often orally
  • scales have an inherence order. if you know the first answer option, you know the remainder of the options
  • sample size over 100 000, random assigned to scale order, also tested labeling, orientation, and number of response categories from 2 to 11
  • the order effect was always a primacy effect, differences were significant though small; significant more due to sample size [then why mention the results if you know they aren’t important?]
  • order effects occurred more with fully labeled scales, end labeled scales did not see response order effects
  • second study also supported the primacy effect with half of questions showing the effect
  • much stronger response seen with unipolar scales
  • vertical scales are much stronger response as well
  • largest effect seen for horizontal unipolar scale
  • need to run the same tests with grids, don’t know which response is more valid, need to know what they will be and when

Impact of repsonse scale direction on survey repsonses in web and mobile web surveys

  • why does this effect happen?
  • tested agreement scales and frequency scales
  • shorter scale decreases primacy effect
  • scale length has a signifciant moderating effect – strongly effect for 7 point scales compared to 5 point scale
  • labeling has significant moderating effects – stronger effect for fully labeled
  • question location matters – stronger effect on earlier questions
  • labeled behavioural scale shows the largest impact, end labeled attitudinal scale has the smallest effect
  • scale direction affects responses – more endorsement at start of scale
  • 7 point fully labeled frequency scale is most affected
  • we must use shorter scales and end labeling to reuce scale direction effects in web surveys

Importance of scale direction between different modes

  • term used is forward/reverse scale [as opposed to ascending/descending or positive/negative keyed]
  • in the forward version of the scale, the web creates more agreement; but face to face it’s very weak. face to face shows recency effect
  • effect is the same for general scales (all scales are agreement) and item specific scales (each scale reflects the specific question), more cognitive effort in the item specific scale so maybe less effort is invested in the response
  • item specific scale affected more by the web
  • randomizing scale matters more in online surveys


Related Posts

 

5 ways to sexy up a chart without using the 3D function #MRX

I know. It’s tempting. You want to make a splash. You want to liven up the page. And you need to do it fast. But what are you supposed to do knowing that the 3D function misrepresents data and makes you look unprofessional as a data visualizer? How can you make your chart really cool and sexy?

Have no fear, my tips are here!

1) choose a really sexy chart that best reflects the data. Line charts for changes over time, bar charts for comparisons of categories, pie charts for percentages that add to 100.
2) choose sexy colours from the primary and secondary colour wheel. Avoid fluorescent colours. Avoid using yellow on white. And keep in mind that 8% of guys are colour blind so consider a restrained use of dotted or dashed lines.
3) choose really sexy labels and titles that clearly describe and explain the contents of the chart.
4) choose sexy scales that start at zero, end just above the largest number, end have 3 or 4 cut points in between.
5) as a last resort, if you think a chart can only be sexy if it has unnecessary and extraneous components, insert several sparkly blinky unicorns and switch careers

IMG_2819.GIF

5, 7, and 9 Point Scales: Do You See The Difference? #MRX

It’s a highly debated question with quantitative data to support all sides. Are 5 point, 7 point, or 9 point scales better suited for generating quality data? Sure, the distribution of responses is slightly different in each case and your ability to conduct more complex statistical analyses can be improved. But I have a few very basic arguments all of which lead me to support scales with  fewer items.

  1. Scales with more points create differences where differences do not exist. Sure, I understand. You want to measure tiny differences. But do consumers REALLY see the difference between 5 and 6 on your 9 point scale? When it comes most ordinary products for most ordinary people, the answer is probably no. Soap is soap and butter is butter and only the brand manager sees the difference.
  2. Let’s assume, however, that people DO see the difference between 5 and 6 because people take the utmost interest in every product that ever existed. And let’s assume you’ve prepared an extremely comprehensive survey with a multitude of grids measuring a multitude of dimensions.  What’s better – 50 grid items using 5 point scales or 50 grid items using 9 point scales.  Those 9 point scales are creating nearly twice as much respondent fatigue and an entire group of people is now even less likely to answer the next survey you so carefully prepared.
  3. How does your analysis plan incorporate those extra scale points? Are you going to provide an average score and standard deviation? If that’s the case, then tell me, how is 3 out of 5 any different than 6 out of 10? I’ll tell you. It’s not. All you’ve done is given yourself a bigger number to work with. And chances are your analysis is incorporating extra error simply because of extra responder fatigue and a higher drop-out rate.

It’s quite simple. Stick with 5 point scales. You’ll generate just as many data points with lots of variability and your survey responders will thank you for it.

Thanksgiving for Research

[tweetmeme source=”lovestats” only_single=false]I am thankful for pie charts that are used to represent percentages out of 100 as opposed to numbers summing to 217.63.

I am thankful for bar charts that reflect quantities of categorical data not trends over time.

I am thankful for knowing whether a rating scale reflects an ordinal or interval scale.

I am thankful for 3.1415927 and chocolate.

I am thankful for loving the work I do and wanting to go to work, for I know that is a rare occurrence.

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