Tag Archives: Ray Poynter

Keynote presentation by Ray Poynter (Excellent!) #MRIA16 #NewMR @raypoynter

Live note taking at the #MRIA16 in Montreal. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

  • [Ray makes a lovely introduction in French. Love it!  ]
  • The large agencies and inside departments will be conducting a smaller percentage of research over time, they are being niched
  • Research WILL become faster and cheaper and in some cases it will become better; this process is accelerating
  • Research will be less about error reduction and more about impact 
  • First driver is customer centricity – do retailers REALLY want to do the right thing for customers?  Sure, but they really want to do better business is this is how to do it
  • The last competitive advantage is your customers, we have to develop ownership and possession
  • Brand loyalty is when people buy your brand against all logic
  • The Panama Canal did not cause people to stop buying bananas because the bananas didn’t take the usual long way around [more giggles 🙂 ]
  • Change is not good for everybody 
  • Big data is a big driver, it’s stealing a lot of budget and delivering relatively little
  • Market research has always been good automation – printing, scanning, auto dialling; we lost a lot of phone interviewers and people typing questionnaires 
  • Artificial intelligence will attack the creative, imaginative part of our work
  • Newspapers are using bots to write copy, journalists just tweak it
  • Democratization of insights – customers are expressing views and want to be heard and involved
  • We are a skill not an industry, “able to use the calculator, I can type” Used to be proud you couldn’t type because it expressed your status
  • Bifurcation of skill and automation – people use automation to become better workers themselves 
  • Big money is in the automated part and big fun is in the small business
  • When you bring money in, you’re no longer a cost center
  • SurveyMonkey is the biggest survey company out there, it is the democratization of insight, bypassing the ‘researcher’ to do things yourself
  • Separation of the skilled and the automated 
  • Do you need a print room? Fax room anymore? No, you can form a brand new company without any formal business needs we used to have.
  • How do we thrive on change
  • Get closer to customers – ethnographer so, anthropologists always did this
  • Quant researchers need to do this, we need to personally hang out in online communities, with real people to see what brands and products are all about
  • Integrate with the rest of the business – volunteer to work with other reas of the company [NEVER say no one asked me to]
  • Understand the language in finance and human resources, don’t improve our language on them, don’t impose our use of the word “significance” on everyone else
  • Be an automation winner – try to be the person who implements automation, the person who pilots it, there is an ongoing role for being an expert
  • If you’re in a company that doesn’t want to automate its processes, move companies
  • Be an improvement enabler – if you aren’t the best, do whatever you can to help the top 1% people be the best
  • Use market research as your edge
  • Rays insight for people joining the work force – don’t do want you love. Thousands of people will be better than you at it. Join a different industry and then you WILL be the best in that industry when people need that skill.
  • Learn a new skill every year – Ray is learning Japanese [really impressive!], it will push you to where you are uncomfortable and that’s not a bad thing, it doesn’t even matter what, but may it a class on how to be a CATI interviewer [chuckle 🙂 ]
  • Automation will affect professionals – doctors, lawyers, researchers, and it won’t be one change, Uber was disruptive but soon when there are automated cars, Uber will be out of business too
  • People don’t always want cheaper or better, templated surveys that do NOT change is very liberating and cheaper to maintain, more cost and customized surveys isn’t always what people want
  • [ray is a great speaker, every time, guaranteed. 🙂 ]

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What’s Hot and What’s Not Hot by Ray Poynter, Vision Critical University #NetGain2015 #MRX

Netgain 2015Live blogging from the Net Gain 2015 conference in Toronto, Canada. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

What’s Hot and What’s Not Hot: Ray Poynter, Director of Vision Critical University

  • Ray’s book are for sale at the back of the conference. Find him and he will sign your book! (Yes, please!)

  •  What is still hot?
  • Mobile is really big and that’s why Ray has written a book on it [buy it 🙂 ]
  • Why is CATI so big – in this room, most people do NOT answer the landline in their home. Mobile used to cost more. Not sure if the person will be driving when you call a mobile phone. Hard to geographically target mobile phones like you could RDD.
  • PEW research is top notch CATI probability surveys. It is the majority of what they do and they have just recently bumped the percentage of their calls that is mobile.
  • Online surveys – 30% are attempted by people on mobile. Some people KNOW they are doing mobile and others don’t. May be 50% in just a couple of years. But only 15% of surveys are suitable for mobile devices. Most surveys are not optimized for mobile. Not thought about wording or question types. Not even checking the data to see if mobile vs laptop data are different.
  • ray poynterIn 950 Tesco stores, they do surveys on tablets with geolocation, datestamp, etc.
  • Heineken did a beer audit in Africa. Recruited interviewers, gave them a smartphone. Phone made SURE every location was geotagged. Photos of every location. Quality of data was far superior.
  • Communities
  • Companies doing so are beginning to disappear because communities are more mainstream. Everyone has their own community.
  • DIY is enormous in society. DIY travel, DIY bank machines, Uber, AirBNB, ZappiStore.
  • DIY has spawned automation. If every idiot can write a survey, they will. So let’s make it safer.
  • SurveyMOnkey is the biggest survey platform in the world.
  • To be hot, it must be scalable and it must work – NPS doesn’t do this. 🙂
  • DIY isn’t great with efficacy. There won’t be many neuroscience for dummies books in the near future.
  • What is HOT right now
  • In the moment – Ask the breakfast survey the very second you finish your breakfast. Survey about the hotel registration before they open their hotel room door.
  • Location Based Research – Put a geofence around a starbucks so you know who walk in or out. This also attracts aggressive marketers, not just researchers. So the message on your phone could be a survey or a sales pitch – ShopKick. Do they turn on the microphone on your phone? Do they turn on your camera? Do they tell you they have done so?
  • Microsurveys – RIWI, google consumer surveys. Usually 1 to 3 questions. Google is up to 10 questions. Won’t tackle your problems that have a high dollar value associated with them.
  • Automation – Automate reports as well as research process. What do we add to this? What do we add to the trends? What canNOT be automated?
  • Always choose the simplest tool – don’t need to take a picture of every window and find software to count those pictures. [sounds stupid but really think about it]
  • What’s bubbling new and exciting
  • Text analytics – sentiment analysis is getting better for all except twitter. much better for emails and letters to companies, comments on youtube, inbound call centers, which letters are genuine sales leads or complaints or bomb threats, reaction marketing.
  • Web Messaging – Whatsapp, WeChat. People are doing less talking to everyone and more talking to individuals. In comparison, whatsapp grew WAY more quickly than facebook and twitter.  This is massively scalable. Panel companies will go this way. [They already are!]
  • ResearchBots – Processing time and moderators takes a lot of time. New things don’t work all the time and that’s why it’s bleeding edge.  Not very scalable at this point
  • NOT so hot
  • Facial coding – good with an extremely experienced trained person sitting in the same room. Via webcam isn’t quite so good. Fully automated is very clever but delivers almost nothing. Software can identify specific pictures but a human must still go and interpret all those pictures. Great for assessing people’s reactions to packages. Not a general purpose tool. Doesn’t suit most research problems.
  • Webcam Qual – You don’t want to take video from home  because you still have to brush your hair and change out of your pajamas. Webcam on the bus means everyone behind you on the bus sees the images too.
  • Social media research – We thought it would destroy MR but it’s really a niche. Most research teams have scaled back on this. Maybe using tweets only. not used so much for insights but more for reactions to advertising campaigns. Social does answer questions not asked. Social usually doesn’t answer your specific research questions.  Vendors often say “I agree it has under-delivered but my company is doing it right!”
  • Social media 2.0 – integration with marketing, integration with survey research, integration with tracking, interrogative.
  • BT Case Study – Net Easy – how easy is it to work with BT was a better measure than NPS. They looked online for people talking about ease or difficulty and responded with solutions. Achieved a 3.5million reduction in costs by doing this. 600 000 people who would have called a telephone were able to DIY from the website.
  • What about passive data, gamification, biometrics, wearables, quantified self, Internet of Things, single source, neuroscience. There is too much stuff to register the quality of everything. You can’t learn it all.
  • Gamification doesn’t solve a lot of problems but it HAS made us rethink what we’re doing it.
  • Behavioural economics is really efficacious but it is incredibly specific.
  • Passive data from phone recording everything you press and everywhere you go. Won’t see big movements here. It will be mostly qualitative.
  • Big data is beginning to move but predictiveness is limited right now.
  • Wearables – sharable is great but these people are not yet representative. Mostly qualitative and very targeted.
  • Geotracking – very tiny right now, works well in qualitative. Can draw maps of where individual people went. Mapping ebola is a different story – limitations of cell phone towers in other countries makes it impossible to map journeys in small locations.
  • Internet of things – only exists in minds and publishers right now.
  • Single source – Means tying together many data sources, it’s a power battle, a methodology battle. WHO is the single source? The telcom? A research company? Privacy battles of combining data.
  • Top 2 Things to think about.
  • Mobile – traditional, in the moment, multimedia, passive
  • Integrative and participative – 360 panels, databases, communities, social, mobile, qual, collaborative all together
  • “We will always need faxes”  “We will always need horse and buggies” ….. We will NOT always need surveys. Ray thinks no more surveys in 20 years – classic 20 or 30 minute surveys. Suspects only 33% of spend will be on surveys by 2019.
  • We need to redesign our ethics – most of our ethics were established 60 years ago mostly by men, all of them white, and most of them dead

Global Trends in Marketing Research with Murphy, Chadwick, and Poynter #MRIA14 #MRX

Live blogging from the #MRIA national conference in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.saskatoon

Panel Discussion on Global Trends in Marketing Research
Moderator: Greg Rogers, Global Director of Consumer Market Knowledge, Proctor and Gamble

 

Panelists (via Web Conferencing):
Leonard Murphy, Chief Editor & Principal Consultant at GreenBook, Simon Chadwick, Managing Partner of Cambiar, Ray Poynter, Director of Vision Critical’s University

  • Lenny:  Change is indeed happening has evidenced by trend data; seeing decline in revenues from the largest companies which means those funds are going to other places likely non-traditional places.
  • Simon: The change is technologically enabled, fewer resources but budgets have remained the same, more social media, more predictive analytics, more synthesizing happening. Trackers are being transferred to fully automated systems.
  • [kind of hard to hear, sorry for missing portions]
  • Some tools get a lot of hype and some are gaining traction
  • Three chunks related to big data – been there, done that; what’s upcoming; what the hell is big data
  • Mobile is the future, two types – forced to rethink our traditional techniques because of the device being used to access surveys, responders made this decision not the researchers; type 2 is all the great things we can do with mobile like geo and in-the-moment research
  • Measuring emotion is becoming important, CMOs are really interested in big data but correlations of big data aren’t everything, customers need emotion and empathy and we need to measure this
  • Big data is good around the edges, the margins
  • There is so much data with so much value and we probably won’t be able to solve this for another five years
  • Privacy is becoming more of an issue particularly in Europe and Canada
  • A phone can scan a face, there is an app to scan the facial expression, BeyondVerbal seems to do this
  • Big data will soon be emotion data
  • Technology is precipitating change in the industry
  • Winners will be the big agencies that buy the innovative companies
  • Ray suggests that marketing and market research will merge and we will need to figure this out
  • Two types of innovative companies – challenging, disrupting companies and then peripheral companies that are new companies from the technology side
  • we’re good at analysis but it is different than synthesis, we need to synthesize the stories [oh my goodness, premonition for my pres later today!]
  • Find something to be really good at whether it’s ethnography or something else
  • Lenny: Are you a marketing researcher or are you in the business of helping people?  Use your curiosity to fix things and answer questions. We come across as number crunching accountants.
  • Lenny recommends exporting more poutine from Canada  🙂
  • 17 million people added to middle class every year, like adding France every year
  • Canadian researchers are up there with the best in the world, and large international presence
  • Vision Critical, Hotspex, RIWI innovative companies coming out of Canada
  • Canada is more influential globally than australia
  • Read more of Ray’s thoughts here: http://newmr.org/dialling-in-to-the-mria-conference-the-shape-of-things-to-come/

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10 answers to contemporary market research questions #MRX

Are you fresh out of school? Full of book knowledge but short on practical knowledge? Then this book is for you!

Join the book launch on May 22nd here!

10 Answers to Contemporary Market Research Questions provides new entrants to market research with a first point of reference in a fast changing industry. In  market research, there are some key concepts, ideas, and pieces of knowledge that even the newest researcher (or a researcher new to a topic) should have at their fingertips.

The 10 Answers to Contemporary Market Research Questions aims to present those key items as a set of questions and answers. While its not a manual of how to conduct research, it does provide nuggets of information that will enable new (and sometimes older) researchers to orientate themselves, and avoid walking into too many of the traps that the changing world of market research can create.market research, there are some key concepts, ideas, and pieces of knowledge that even the newest researcher (or a researcher new to a topic) should have at their fingertips.

The Project Team
The book has been created through the voluntary and collaborative efforts of a team of people brought together by ESOMAR to generate this resource as part of the celebration of its 65th year. The project curators are Finn Raben, director general of esomar, Sue York, chief curator of Newmr, and Ray Poynter, Director of Vision Critical University, Vision Critical.

The contributing authors are:
Suz Allen, Sven Arn, Reg Baker, Susan Bell, Pete Cape, Alison Dexter, Dirk Huisman, Nasir Khan, Kathryn Korostoff, Phyllis Macfarlane, Omar Mahmoud, Bernie Malinoff, Katie O’Connor, Stephen Paton, Annie Pettit, Pravin Shekar, Anouk Willems and Tom Wilms.

The editors are Ray Poynter and Sue York.

Join the book launch on May 22nd here!

Ray Poynter – Overview of Online Research Trends #netgain

Image representing Conversition as depicted in...

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Author: Handbook of Online and Social Media Research
Director of The Future Place
.
First live blog of the day. What follows are some of my silly musings and key take-aways of the session.

  • Today’s timing device… an iPad! Perhaps this is today’s surprise giveaway? I wish!
  • Ray has just explained that different hand signals report different types of humor, because us Canadians don’t understand the UK sense of humour. 🙂
  • Someone just yelled out the number 55 in the middle of Ray speaking. And he gave them a free book. You tweeters know what that is about!
  • Electronic wake – the path you leave behind as you use electronic devices, phones, computers, etc
  • MROCs will go mainstream (everyone puts their head down and takes this note 🙂
  • There will be turf battles for listening research, problem is contendors are not from market research (except Conversition!)
  • There will be more niche services. Lots of money here but just small amounts for small companies.
  • Surveys will still be rubish. We know what makes a bad survey and we are still doing them, only worse. No one is really improving anything. (Ha! I agree. We still do this badly.)
  • Convenience sampling arrives. People will finally agree that research does not use probability samples. That whole confidence interval thing does not apply. “We have a great convenience sample!”
  • There will be a battle of the paradigms. Significance testing and confidence intervals is just a ritual in social sciences.
  • We will seek consistency but not validity. We know how to achieve consistency within a certain level of tolerance. Polling worries about validity and the rest market research needs to worry about that too.
  • Peak survey. There will never be more people on panels than there are right now. Everyone who wants to be on a panel is on a survey. At one point, there will never be more surveys done than at this point. (Are you scared?!)
  • Scandals similar to “patients like me” are going to show up more often in our industry. Prosecutions for falsifying evidence are happening more often. More people are sharing private surveys online, sharing how badly surveys are being done. (Will we smarten up or hide better?)
  • Qualitative will make a resurrgence. Might go up to 25% of industry in next few years. Ethnography is really getting thrown around. “ographies” will be all over the place. WHY is a qualitative question.
  • Buzz words for 2011 in Ray’s “humble” opinion (that’s how he said it!)
  • Declining: 2.0, collaboration, brain, engagement, representative, science
  • Increasing: one as in one number, infographics (NO!!!!!!!), smart as in phones, sentiment, scrapegates, ethno

Related Links
#Netgain5 Keynote Roundup: Last Thoughts
Brian Levine: Neuroscience and Marketing Research
Brian Singh: Insights from the Nenshi Campaign
Monique Morden: Online Communities, MROCs
Ray Poynter – Overview of Online Research Trends
Tom Anderson: Web Analytics
Will Goodhand: Social Media Research and Digividuals

Reminiscing the First Annual 2010 New MR Virtual Festival #MRX

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Perhaps it’s a bit presumptuous of me to call it the first annual when there is not yet any certainty that there will be a second annual, but from what I experienced, the second is yet to come. Continue reading →

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