Tag Archives: Politics

How America experiences Clinton & Trump, by Ryan Baum, @FocusVisionInfo #NewMR

Live note taking from the October 27, 2016 webinar. Any errors are my own.

  • Emotions evolved through natural selection and so are recognizable in humans regardless of language and culture
  • Pioneers
    • Paul Ekman, top psychologist noted by American Psychological Association and Time magazine, six basic emotions – anger, happiness, surprise, disgust, sadness, and fear
    • Robert Plutchik: Own emotion model added two more emotions to Ekman’s model – joy, trust, fear, surprise, sadness, anticipation, anger, and disgust. Plutchik’s model incorporates color so that rage is red, grief is blue, loathing is purple, colors we are familiar with
  • Valence: how positive or negative people feel about something. Neutral emotions are surprise or anticipation which can be positive or negative depending on the emotion, a good surprise or a bad surprise
  • What emotions do people feel towards the candidates? What intensity, what valence? And why do people feel this way?
  • GenPop USA of 2000 people who have seen or heard many things about both Clinton and Trump
  • Intent was not to predict but rather to understand voting behaviors so they included people who did and did not intend to vote
  • Audience invited to answer a survey: http://www.focusvision.com/Election2016 (oops! For USA people only so it looks like I want to vote but I refuse to J  )
  • People feel negative about both candidates, People feel the negative emotions at a higher intensity than the positive emotions, Independent voters feel equally negative about both candidates
  • Trump holds a monopoly on the surprise emotion
  • People feel more negative about trump in all regions, all ages and young people in particular, and all income groups
  • Based on open end verbatims they evaluated why those emotions were held for each candidate
    • Why does Hillary make people feel joy? Qualified, first female, good intentions, aligns with political views, best candidate
    • Why does Trump make people feel joy: Outspoken, new ideas, represents change, best candidate, aligns with political views, successful businessman, problem solver
    • Why does Hillary make people feelanger: dishonest, privileged, different political views, pro-choice on abortion
    • Why does Trump make people feel angry: bigot, egotistical, unfit, bad intentions, ignorant, bully, dishonest
    • Why does Hillary make people feel anticipation: winning, first female president, future accomplishment
    • Why does Trump make people feel anticipation: change, winning, what will he say or do next, actions as president
    • Why does Hillary make people feel fear: distrust, unfit, uncertainty, personal agenda, safety of our nation, no change from Obama, loose freedom, gun rights
    • Why does Trump make people feel fear: reckless, unfit, bigot, damage relationships, hateful agenda
    • Why does Hillary make people feel surprise: made it this far, first female president
    • Why does Trump make people feel surprise: outlandish remarks, made it this far, unpredictable, changes his mind
    • Why does Hillary make people feel sadness: dishonest, don’t want her to win, will hurt country, no change, poor past decisions, wanted Bernie to win, only wins because trump is worse
    • Why does Trump make people feel sad: offensive, people support him, he might win, will hurt America, no better republican
    • Why does Hillary make people feel trust: political experience, good intentions, similar political views
    • Why does Trump make people feel trust: businessman, outspoken, not a career politician, loves American, good intentions
    • Why does Clinton make people feel distrust: privileged, pro-choice, her husband’s affair, cunning, different political views
    • Why does Trump make people feel disgust: hateful, bigot, reckless, ignorant, rude, bully, egotistical
  • Candidates are trusted within their own party
  • 88% of millennials feels anger towards trump, 61% of females feel anticipation towards Clinton
  • People who like trump says he’s outspoken but people who don’t like him say he is hateful
  • Emotions are best measured over time
  • Now live results from the questionnaire we just answered (keep in mind the audience is researchers who know how questionnaires work, not people necessarily answering honestly)

votingimage

Uses of survey and polling data collection: practical and ethical implications #PAPOR #MRX 

Live blogged at #PAPOR in San Francisco. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Are California’s Registered Independents Shy Partisans?, David Kordus, Public Policy Institute of California

  • number of independent voters has doubled in the last twenty years
  • automatic voter registration via the DMV will add new voters
  • independents are not one homogeneous group
  • on average, they really are the middle between republicans and democrats, not necessarily more moderate

Exploring the Financial Landscape Facing Veterans in Nevada: Financial Literacy, Decision-making, and Payday Loans, Justin S. Gardner & Christopher Stream, UNLV, Runner-Up Student Paper Competition Winner

  • payday lending only started in the 1990s, more of them in military areas
  • largest security clearance issues were financial, capped interest rate of payday loans
  • 375 respondents, lots of disabled veterans who can’t work
  • use as medical loans is very low, many use it to pay off student loans or other debts, paying for housing also major use
  • most learned about it from tv commercials, or friends and family. If family are encouraging them to do this, something needs to change
  • people who don’t feel prepared for emergencies are more likely to use
  • majority had salary under $50 000, likely to need another loan in the future
  • 20% had used payday, it is cyclical, once you’re in the cycle it’s difficult to break out of it
  • half people could walk there from their home, didn’t need a car

What Constitutes Informed Consent? Understanding Respondents’ Need for Transparency, Nicole Buttermore, Randall Thomas, Frances M. Barlas, & Mansour Fahimi, GfK

  • biggest threat is release of name of participant but should participants be told sponsor of the study?
  • problem is nonresponse and survey bias if people know who the sponsor is
  • 6% thought taking a survey could have a negative impact on their life – worried about data breach, who has access to data, company might be hacked, improper use of data, questions might make me feel uncomfortable
  • 95% think surveys have no or minimal risk to my mental health – about 23% have quit a survey because it made them feel uncomfortable
  • about 20% said a survey has made them feel very uncomfortable – ask abour race, income, too much personal information, can’t give the exact answer they want to, feel political surveys are slanted, surveys are boring, don’t know how to answer the question
  • respondents want to know how personal information will be used and how privacy will be protected
  • want to know how long it will take, the topic, and the points for it
  • about twenty percent want to know company doing the research and company paying for the research

Recent Changes to the Telecommunications Consumer Protection Act, Bob Davis, Davis Research

  • this is not legal advice
  • TCPA issue is regarding calls using automated telephone equipment
  • lawyers like to threaten to sue but settle
  • vicarious liability – responsibility of the superior for the acts of their subordinates, i.e., contract work, sponsor of research
  • any phone with a redial button is an autodialer – so only the old phones where you stick your finger in the hole and turn the dial is not an autodialer
  • if you can get permission, then get it
  • regularly scrub your landline system to make sure there are no cell phones in it
  • use a non-predictive dialing system
  • ask that suppliers are TCPA compliant
  • international partners dialing into the US need to follow the rules as well
  • talk with your lawyer ahead of time so you can say you have already talked to a lawyer and they don’t think you are weak

Brian Singh: Insights from the Nenshi Campaign #netgain #mrx

Infographic on how Social Media are being used...

Image via Wikipedia

What follows are some of my silly musings and key take-aways of the session.
Brian Singh, ZINC Research, Insights from Nenshi Campaign
– Who is Nenshi? No awareness nor familiarity, no money for this political candidate in Calgary
– Used multiple methods, translated social media into REAL ACTION
– They needed to “seed” advocates, point people to where you want them to look, give something for people to talk about
– Are the people you are trying to speak to even on social media?
– They needed to connect to the hyper-engaged so that those people will build the information
– (They had a research strategy with their social media research!)
– Really nice perceptual map of leadership by personability, Nenshi was higher on personal, lower on leadership, very in the middle of the other political candidates
– Found the most common searches were “is he gay” and “is he muslim” – so they created videos around these questions
– Crowdsourced material is extremely important and usually the most popular
– People love the homemade political messages, barney images, handmade voting signs, graffiti
– Need to marry social media research with political polling, you must be literate in this method

Related Links
#Netgain5 Keynote Roundup: Last Thoughts
Brian Levine: Neuroscience and Marketing Research
Brian Singh: Insights from the Nenshi Campaign
Monique Morden: Online Communities, MROCs
Ray Poynter – Overview of Online Research Trends
Tom Anderson: Web Analytics
Will Goodhand: Social Media Research and Digividuals

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