Tag Archives: Implicit

Questionning mobile methods and contradictory data #MRIA2017 

Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in toronto. Any  errors or bad jokes are my own.

Bridging the Survey vs. Sales Data Disconnect

Mariangelica Rodriguez, Consumer Insights Manager, PepsiCo Beverages Canada, William Pink, Chairman, Kantar Millward Brown – Marketing Science Council

  • The difference between what people say and do can be large, especially when you match opinions to home scan data
  • This type of data can get hidden because marketers don’t know how to deal with it
  • Is something in the system broken? 
  • Is there a better and different approach to monitor brand performance. What signals should be measured in the short term? Is an ongoing tracker survey necessary? How do you evolve from a survey mindset to a connected data intelligence mindset?
  • Businesses want speed to insight, connected data, less asking and more observing, migration from descriptive to prescriptive, more accurate and granular understanding
  • Need faster decision making, quarterly used to be frequent but now we need days or minutes
  • Data should never be treated in a vacuum disregarding all other pieces of data
  • Consider setting up alerts for when data moves outside a defined margin
  • We may live in a survey first world but its surround first and survey second – use search and social data for signals of campaign impact and brand strength
  • Use intuitive associations, speed of response tests to understand how people feel about brands ad services, tells a completely different story than surveys [I LOVE implicit data because people can’t and don’t want to tell you the truth]

Swipe Right > T2B: How Incorporating User Design from Tinder and Uber Can Improve Mobile Research

Kevin Hare, Vice President, Dig Insights Inc.

  • Mobile devices have matured – swipes, menu stacks, pinch to zoom. Consumers have a new set of behaviours to indicate preferences and make decisions.
  • 19% of surveys are mobile optimized, 55% have bad design that leads ot poor survey experience  [it is SHOCKING that we choose to do this.]
  1. Tinder is a dating app with simple interface – swipe left or right. You can swipe right or left on products too. Or on features, brands, services. Intuitive interest is a quick swipe right.  Considered interest means you read the description first. Intuitive rejection means a quick swipe left. Considered rejection means you read it then reject it. Process is intuitive. Survey questions often correlate which means you’re asking too many questions. This method helps that problem. Can replicate box scores with this data. Can also do network maps and correspondent maps.
  2. Chatbots. Way to access information, make decisions, and communicate. Beginning of a new form of digital access. People spend most of their time on just five downloaded apps. Conversation is a natural user interface. Not much too learn. AI tools aren’t perfect but they are exploding. 80% of people like the experience which is 4 times more than survey numbers.
  3. Google maps.  Your phone defaults to tracking you.  Google can make much of this information available to you via APIs.  Use it to track purchases. Pick the date you went shopping, identify how you paid. Then go to google maps and choose the location you went to.  Helps with recall, you can check the map to see where you were that day. Engaging map deliverables for your clients.
  4. Ratings. Feedback loops from simple five start rating system returns many metrics on how to improve service.  Use a system like this at end of survey. Give a star rating. Give a few easy prompts for what did you like or dislike. This is how uber does it, also hotel ratings. Step 1, choose overal satisfaction. Step 2, choose the satisfied features. Step 3, choose the dissatisfied features.

Bridging the Marketing & Research Chasm

Neil Rennert, Marketing Research and Consumer Insights Manager, Canada Dry Mott’s, Juliann Ng, Vice President Consulting, GfK

  • Ask a question three ways – from the client perspective (e.g., to get a bonus), from the business perspective, from the research perspective. 
  • “A more beautiful question” book to consider reading
  • We’re sort of trained to just answer the question, don’t challenge the question. The questions you asked are shaped by your experiences. 
  • Try asking ‘why’ a few more times, not just once or twice. 
  • Think about opening and closing. Close an open ended question and you’ll get a brand new perspective. You could get contradictory answers. 

Should market researchers measure the conscious or unconscious mind? #MRX #NewMR

Measuring the unconscious through implicit techniques is in-vogue right now, and I’ll admit that I’ve been a huge fan of them for a couple decades, ever since I got to use a tachistoscope in university. Implicit techniques are based on the premise that people’s feelings, opinions, and attitudes are often not accessible to basic awareness. You’re probably most familiar with this in terms of people not recognizing or admitting that they are sexist, racist, homophobic, or xenophobic. Or, at least, the extent to which they are —ist or —ic.

Oh yes, I HAD to choose an iceberg image. The world needs to see another 83 trillion of them before we pick a new image. 🙂

Implicit techniques often entail having people do word or image comparisons at super-high speeds. For instance, you might ask people to assign one set of 100 words (e.g., adventurous, bewildered, debonair, heroic, birthday balloons, seaside, pyramids) to a couple of brands in under a minute. A choice must be made for every single word. The reasoning behind this technique is that decisions are made too quickly for logical thought to occur. Rather, gut feelings, the unconscious mind, the reptilian brain, are the only processes being accessed.

But what about this scenario?

I KNOW I am sexist, racist, homophobic, and xenophobic. I was raised in that culture and it is embedded in me. Growing up, I saw sexism and racism all over the media and, today, I see homophobia and xenophobia all over media. At this point in my life, it would be massively hard to make that part of me disappear. Fortunately, what I can do, and what I have done, is to recognize that part of me so damn fast that it has miniscule effects on my actions. I know these biases exist in every socialized human being (ah, the innocence of babies who haven’t yet been taught to be biased!) and I actively tell myself that those feelings are wrong. I’ve actively moved the treatment of those thoughts and feelings from the unconscious to the conscious.

Which brings me to my main point. It doesn’t make sense to always and only measure the unconscious. Why? Because my actions will demonstrate a completely different story than my unconscious brain will reveal. Implicit testing may suggest that I wouldn’t be amenable to a person, brand, service, or company, but then, low and behold, there I am endorsing, using, and buying it. My biased brain is contradicting the scientifically developed prediction algorithm that says I will not open my wallet.

I hope you’ll take a couple of lessons from this.

  • Never forgo implicit techniques for explicit techniques. Both are always mandatory or you will have gaps in your understandings and treatments. You need to know what biases and conscious decisions relate to your brand.
  • Accept that human beings, including you, have negative biases. And that’s not a bad thing. The only bad thing is being unable to recognize and being unwilling to accept those biases.

Marktforschung.de showcase: quick summaries of 5 talks from German research companies #IIeX 

Live notetaking at #IIeX in amsterdam. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Realtime research in the digital age by Holger Geibler, YouGov

  • What do people think about research – political polls, representativeness, big data, how slow research is
  • What is real time research – can be from NOW to one week to complete, real time is related to historical timelines
  • We need to be where the respondent is, need to ask less, engage more, connect more – keep surveys under 16 minutes and avoid dropouts, remember than mobile surveys take 10 to 20% longer to complete
  • Let clients access data in real-time but tell them its preliminary, train clients and consultants to use a dashboard, have dashboards that switch between weighted and unweighted data

Reaching millennials via mobile apps and getting superior survey data through gamification by Jonathan Kurfess, Appinio

  • People want to share opinions even if you don’t want to hear it or don’t agree with it
  • #MRX is struggling to adapt to millennial user behaviour – longer questions are good for researchers but not for respondents
  • Money is not a sufficient incentive
  • An app that allows people to interact with each other, compare opinions, create polls and gather opinions is very engaging
  • Ensure questionnaires are mobile optimized

Germans got humor? Only if it’s efficient by Oliver Switzer, September Strategy and Foreshung

  • Do purchasers have emotions about steel? Of course they do. Emotion is involved with everything. Emotion isn’t just anger or disgust.
  • Germans like to be funny not just measure efficiency. Being funner is teh container, the vehicle.
  • Evolution made humans emotional, we used to be emotional about safety and now we’re emotional about product packaging
  • Our consciousness is there just to get orders from our subconscious
  • You can apply KPIs to emotions
  • Our brains is very activated when we see brand names we recognize versus made up brands
  • Our heart beats at different rates for different emotions, fear, trust, anger, skepticism, stress, relelvant, attraction, closeness [ask to see the charts, quite cool]
  • You can feel trust and skeptisism at the same time
  • [never occured to me to treat emotions as KPIs]

Implicit influence explained: how to define and measure the unconscious effects of words and images by Jonathan Mall, Neuro-Flash

  • People who though a zoo is safe even though a gorilla was supposed to have escaped assumed zoo handled the situation properly, these people read a certain type of newspaper
  • Priming means setting you up to feel something, lead to a preference, lead to a purchase
  • We could connect a gorilla to chocolate in a commercials, people who like one will like the other
  • You can’t simply look at one aspect of an ad, you need conscious and unconscious effects
  • people will say something looks good but their unconscious might be noticing the pretty lady on the side, if there is too much attention in the wrong place, then you have an issue
  • The four Ps: primal, priming, preference, purchase

Understanding emotion decision drivers using brain scans by Kai Muller, The Neuromarketing Labs

  • People don’t think how they feel, and they don’t say what they think and they don’t do what they way
  • We can map disgust in the brain as well as other emotions
  • Funny ads engage the heart and the min
  • Annoying ads evoke negative emotions and high attention
  • Positive and negative mentions can impact sales an this is measureable 
  • Were able to match the results of the ad concept with the finished ad

This year’s overused image was the iceberg, two of which appeared in this track. And the second iceberg speaker chuckled over it as his slide appeared. Sorry Homer’s brain, you’re last year. 🙂

 

The Brains Behind Better Marketing: Using Neuroscience to diagnose and optimize marketing efforts, By Michael Smith, Nielsen Consumer Neuroscience

Live note taking at the November 10, 2016 webinar. Any errors are my own.

  • Consumer neuroscience is relative new, over the last decade
  • Think then feel, weighs pros and cons of product benefits and through rational optimization and then you think about some products being more valuable. This is completely backwards. Maybe we use emotions as a first gauge prior to coming to thinking decisions.
  • This is not new, Kahneman wrote about system 1 and system 2 which are thinking fast and thinking slow. Fast is intuition, automatic, and emotional. Slow is emotional, deliberate, and logical. Hare and turtle.
  • System 1 starts before system 2 is even on board.
  • Traditional consumer insights are market data, POS, panel, explicit data, focus groups and questionnaires. We also need implicit, non-conscious, and physiological reactions to get a more complete view of the consumer.
  • Tools include EEG, core biometrics, facial coding, eye tracking, self report
  • EEG – 32 sensors collect data 500 times per second to capture activity across the brain, can measure response to marketing materials
  • Biometrics – galvanic skin response/sweat, sensors on fingertips, heartrate
  • Facial expressions to show surprise, confusion, joy, sadness, cameras also show where eyes are looking at an ad or commercial
  • EEG trace has a lot of granularity, change it into a profile of activity over time, aggregate data over many people, can see high and low points, which scenes are high or low engaging [wish he’d talk about people not consumers]
  • Can measure memory activation, attention processing, and emotional motivation
  • Have 80 years of research on this so we know what is getting into memory, degree to which people are engaged in the communication, and intentional attention and processing
  • Biometrics give us momentary engagement, degree of arousal from the ad, emotional highpoint, does it grow over time or finish on a strong point, do they tune out before your branding occurs
  • Facial coding and expressed emotions, if there is no emotion the ad won’t be successful, impacts success of delivery, some ads are designed to create a specific emotion
  • People are drawn to the center of a stimulus and they naturally attend to faces, people want to look at people, but you might want people to look at your 1-800 number or your logo
  • Neuroscience tools are predictive of sales – neuro combined is the best, followed by EEG, biometrics, surveys, and lastly facial coding [of course, the best tool is always a combination of tools]
  • Case study – public service advertising – Cheerleader PSA, ad to encourage dad’s to be involved in their kid’s lives – Woman is upset about a crazy man dancing outside her window but then you see he is cheering with his daughter

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvNHCRFL17k

  • People liked the ad, 79% top 2 box
  • EEG and biometrics scored it high, lots of engagement, attention, engagement
  • There are peaks and valleys at various parts of the 30 second ad, at the lady scowling, seeing the cute little girl
  • Biometric trace shows a slow build, had a positive call to action
  • Put EEG, biometrics and facial coding together on one chart, kind of neat, negative expressed emotion at the beginning but becomes very positive at the end

eeg facial coding biometrics

  • Heatmap shows ‘attention vampires’ – people are looking at irrelevant things over the logo and phone number, it’s nice to look at the little girl but you need people to see your brand, maybe put the call in number to where people are looking and reduce the distractions when you show the important info
  • Neuro measures the non-conscious, ensures emotional connections exist, provides granular diagnostics
  • If you have norms, do you still need neuro? quant alone is only part of the answer
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