Tag Archives: artifical intelligence

Future of the smart home by Emily Taylor and Manish Nargas, IDC Canada, #BigDataTO #SmartHome #ConnectedHome #AI

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • By 2020, every home will have 40 connected devices – TV, appliances, health, assistance, security 
  • Wearables help consumers track and log their activities such as wellness goals, athletic training, weight loss monitoring, medication reminders, gamification of activities. 1 in 5 Canadians currently own a device as a wristband or a watch and 70% of those owners have no plans to upgrade or replace. 60% of consumers are not interested in wearables at all. Designs will be less obvious, have improved battery life, and use new materials like smart fabrics. Medical devices will have better reliability and validity and this will help the healthcare sector and be relevant for insurance companies
  • Security devices – smoke alarms, motion sensors, doorbells, security systems, remote home monitoring. These devices offer peace of mind. It’s no longer about emergency services but monitoring to see if the kids are home, a window is opened, the jewelry box is still there, perhaps even see if it’s a friend or foe at your front door. 
  • Home automation – these devices will help us reduce energy usage, increase safety including devices such as thermostats, light switches, outlets, appliances. IKEA has launched a smart home lighting system with wire-free lighting at a lower cost than their competitor. They will bring this technology into every piece of furniture and curtains [window blankets 🙂 ]
  • Personal health devices – These devices will result in increased awareness of monitoring. Health monitoring will take place from the home not a hospital and will result in fewer trips to the doctor and hospital. Connected clothing will help with this. Gym equipment brands now sync with health monitoring devices so you can monitor treadmill and walking together and get more consistent results. 
  • Intelligent assistants/bots – more natural way to interact with machines, removes the complexity of interconnections, vocalizes thought and activity, uses real time machine learning. Low adoption rates in Canada but many bots aren’t available in Canada. Connecting a speaker to the internet isn’t revolutionary but it can improve personalization. 60% of Canadians don’t care about bots but bots are here to stay. It is Alexa and soon will be your butler. It will be ubiquitous.
  • There are gaps. Many devices are siloed right now. They have limited conversations with other smart home devices. The market is too focused on DIY right now as people want to solve specific problems not do the entire home in one shot. There is little support across the solutions. 
  • Do you need a smart-fork that monitors how quickly you eat? Do you need this fork to connect to your lights and smoke alarm?
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When will we drive autonomous vehicles, by Kashmir Zahid, Ericsson Digital Services (Great talk) #BigDataTO #BigData #AI #Automation

Notes from the #BigDataTO conference in Toronto

  • 1996 GM introduced Onstar. It had a weak interface, few features, and was mainly designed to offer roadside assistance.
  • 2010 saw in-car navigation but it still wasn’t user friendly nor easy to operate while you were driving.
  • 2012 Tesla built an all electric car and people could finally see the possibilities of vehicles with electricity and connectivity. Now that vehicles had so much digital, manufacturers could no longer stay in the shadows and let dealerships handle all the consumer interactions.
  • 2014 Apple CarPlay and android auto were introduced. Connectivity was embedded in the car from the time it was installed in the factory as opposed to being added by the consumer after the fact. 
  • 2015 remote diagnostics are now available, repairs can now be recommended by the vehicle rather than going to the dealership or following the manual. 
  • 2015 Tesla creates autopilot, a self guiding car but the user is still expected to take physical control when needed. 
  • 2017, the Google car is no longer a science project, it is a reality. 

At CES, three trends were noted

1. cars will be integrated into your life and communicate with your personal device, e.g., your home will be ready to receive you when you arrive, the temperature is set appropriately, the lights are turned on, the garage door is opened, and the turkey is ready to be taken out of the oven

2. Automation will create a natural experience of talking to your car, Alexa is winning here [although it just accidentally bought Whole Foods so I don’t know about the quality at this point]

3. Car to car communication – this will allow vehicles to see and talk to each other, so they can maintain speed and safety among other cars on the road

  • Now that everything talks to everything, our user experiences will be completely transformed. 
  • By 2020, 90% of cars will be connected
  • 4 trends in the industry

1. Cars must be connected, software defined car

2. Electrification, ITS, infrastructure

3. Automation, connected automated mobility

4. New business models, multi industry ecosystems

  • This is the largest change in transportation since Ford’s model T
  • Soon, we will have everything we need to travel but we won’t own the car. [Think of music, we no longer own the music we buy and we could lose it instantly if Apple decides to shut something down]
  • Insurance will depend on how you drive, your telemetrics. And later on, insurance won’t be necessary as human drivers won’t be responsible for safety. 
  • Emergency assistance providers will be affected as cars will have embedded systems that alert first responders instantly to ask if you are safe. 
  • Government providers will need to reconsider what legislation is needed to take care of drivers and roads. 
  • 13 out of 14 of the big vehicle manufactures plan to make an autonomous vehicle in the next couple of years
  • Google, Apple, Intel, Microsoft and Amazon have focus and investment in self driving car projects. Telecom operators like AT&T, verizon, Vodafone see the potential of new revenue in self driving car. Uber, Lyft, DIDI and many other startups are trying to disrupt the traditional car ownership model. 
  • The passenger economy will be worth $7 trillion by 2050. 
  • We are about to see consumer mobility as a service – one stop shop for transportation for everyone who doesn’t own a car [this is amazing for people who don’t know how to drive, are too old to drive, too young to drive, not well enough to drive] 
  • This will save over half a million lives due to safety from fewer accidents. And, it will free up your time since you don’t have to physically drive.
  • We are two years away from letting people sleep in a Tesla on long road trips where the car has not made the trip before – Elon Musk
  • Challenges

1. Public safety – people need to trust the machine to work while they sleep. 

2. Data privacy and security – who has, uses, and sells my data. It’s not transparent right now. 

3. Rules and Regulations – Who is liable for an accident? Who owns the vehicle that caused the accident?

  • Connected cars will open multiple innovative services. 
  • They will improve the efficiency and security of new value added services for both consumers and enterprises. 
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