Highlights from Day 1 of the #BigDataTO Conference #BigData #AI

I’ll admit I didn’t have high hopes. How good could a free conference about big data and artificial intelligence be? Especially if the upgrade tickets, which I so frugally declined, were only $75? Well, I was pleasantly surprised.

Let’s deal with the negatives first. The morning registration line was long and it took some people 30 minutes o get through it. The exhibition hall was small with not nearly as many vendors as I am used to seeing at conferences. There was no free wifi in the main hall (um, admission was free so why do we deserve free wifi too?). Sometimes the sessions were so packed, there wasn’t even room to stand. And, some speakers didn’t even show up because, well, airplanes.

However, those negatives were completely washed aside with the positives. Some of the talks were quite good. Some of the speakers were quite good. The topics were quite good. They gave out free conference programs. And did I say free? Some free things are worth what you paid for them. This one was worth a lot more. I highly advise you to go and it’s definitely on my 2018 conference schedule as time well spent.

So, here are a few tidbits of knowledge from a bunch of different speakers that intrigued me today.

  • Data science is often handled at the tail-end of a project. We only take the time to learn what happened after the fact and when it’s too late to do anything about the current situation. We need to do a better job of using our data for the future – for segmentation, targeting, to understand what our customers want, to uncover blind spots.
  • Good data scientists care where the data came from, who created it, what it represents. They don’t just take the data and run it through stats programs and spit out reports. It’s not just about statistics and reporting. Data quality must come first.
  • The real money is not in having the data but rather in knowing what questions to ask. Literally everyone has data but only the companies that hire the smart brains to ask the right questions will succeed with big data.
  • You might think using artificial intelligence is very impersonal. On the contrary. It’s impossible for a human being to be personal with hundreds and thousands of people but AI allows you to be far MORE personal  with thousands or millions of people.
  • Computers and artificial intelligence need to learn the senses – for instance, they need to learn to see the types of moles on skin that will become cancer, learn to hear which wheels on a train are cracked and about to cause a train wreck.
  • Algorithms are what make computer see and listen and as such algorithms are the future. Soon, companies will brag about their algorithms not their data.
  • We need to let computers do the pattern recognition so that humans can do the strategizing and reasoning
  • If you want to work with big data but can’t afford it, have no fears. So much software is free and open source. You can do anything you want with free tools so don’t let dollars hold you back from doing or learning.
  • The danger with artificial intelligence is training it with bad, untrustworthy, biased data. We’ve all seen the reports of AI perpetuating racism because the training data contained racist data. You must choose good datasets that are clean and genuinely unbiased and only then will you find success.
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The next generation of market research and insights creation #IIeX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors are my own.

Panel: The Next Generation of Market Research & Insights Creation
;
Moderated by Leonard Murphy (GreenBook) with panelists Chris Enger (Periscope by McKinsey), Tamara Char (Periscope by McKinsey), & Simon Chadwick (Cambiar)

  • Periscope by McKinsey is a suite of tools for collecting learnings, analytics
  • Our entire industry is fragmented, over half of companies that source data did not exist ten years ago and they may not exist ten years form now
  • Technology is not the driver of change, client needs and circumstances are the drivers of change, they are being asked to do far more with budgets lower than they used to be, they much get creative
  • Behavioural data and analytics techniques to analyze that data is suddenly easily available and analyzable, this changes everything about being able to identify insights and work in an agile way, can get to 80/20 answers more quickly, we don’t need the 100% answer, we need to make progress on problem solving
  • Are analytics pushing the business forward, are the ‘researchers’ falling behind and failing to get seat at the table?
  • Need to elevate the quality and consistency of data so that the leadership is never getting three answers to the same question nor are employees hearing diverging answers
  • You must have a c-suite leader and hopefully the chief financial officer who has a longer tenure in a company, not the chief marketing officer
  • The CMO needs to spend time developing strategies not waiting to get data, let the machines do the heavy lifting so the team can spend their time strategizing
  • What is the role of the methodologist, understanding fit for purpose of all the tools, this is why we’re seeing so much fragmentation, 
  • In the USA, people are attracted by tools. In the EU, they are more focused on ideas and creativity, and try to be creative all through the entire process. Need to be less technologically focused in the USA. 
  • Try assigning various people on th c-suite to BE a person in a segment, have them go shopping for her, experience her, all to get them to empathize more clearly, because c-suite lives are so completely different from their segments
  • Is automation a dirty word? Machine learning templates and speeds everything up, may eliminate bias of an individual person although it will perpetuate bias that exists within the data
  • We need to present data for ten minutes and then discuss the oilers and solutions for the remaining 50 minutes

Panel: The GRIT Report & Future Impacts
; Moderated by Leonard Murphy (GreenBook) with panelists Aaron Reid, Ph.D (Sentient Decision Science), Patricia Chapin-Bayley (Toluna), Rick Kelly (Fuel Cycle) & Isaac Rogers (20|20 Research)

  • Automation is mostly used for analysis of surveys data, charting and infographics, analysis of text data, analysis of social media, sampling
  • “My clients aren’t asking me for social media data” no they aren’t, they’re asking someone else
  • Automation frees up time to expand capacity and do more, many things will soon be automated. We must adapt to this or fall by the wayside.
  • Buyers are slow to adopt automation, automation is a dirty word because they think it is DIY and it will be more work. It will actually free up resources and allow you to do more once you are trained and moving forward.
  • Do you want to be at a data collection conference in five years or at an insights conferences? Your business must adopt automation.
  • People don’t CARE if you automate, they want better research insights and thinking. You must have automation to get there.
  • Automation may not cut your budget but it allows you to move your budget into higher value endeavours.
  • What should samplers do? Advise on representativity, enforce length of interview limits, consult on questionnaire design, restrict to mobile only, forbid mobile-unfriendly. it is an absutive relationship – clients don’t want to pay for consumer friendly and respectful questionnaires.
  • There is no such thing as a non-mobile study. Every device must work and work well. You cannot run a survey without mobile respondents or you are guaranteed a nonrepresentative sample. Why is this even a conversation?
  • If you aren’t thinking mobile first, you are being stupid. We spend half of our time on our devices.  It is a data quality issue. [Cannot agree with this comment enough]
  • Educating the researcher of the future – they need critical thinking and storytelling skills. We all need to be critical thinking experts, you shouldn’t in the business without that.  We need to train the current workforce on how to do this. We’ve trained people on how to run cross-tabs but they need training on storytelling and turning insights into action.
  • Quick research doesn’t have to be quick and dirty or poor quality
  • The technology doesn’t matter, the platform doesn’t matter, we need to stop talking about the technology and focus on consultation, understanding the problem 

Future tech: Real-time feedback, video, and agile research #IIeX 

Live note taking at #IIeX in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Chaired by Marc Engel 

Service Recovery, Gurt and Paul from Feedtrail

  • [presented with 11 minutes notice so huge kudos to you!)
  • Customer feedback program that measures the experience immediately not 2 days or 2 months from now
  • Helps you ensure the appropriate person knows about the problem immediately so the issue can be resolved immediately
  • You don’t need to wait until the end of your hotel experience to give your review of the bed or the bathroom. Give your review now so they can fix things when you still need them fixed,

Email is Dead. PowerPoint is Dead. Smart Video is Now the Killer Way to Communicate Insights! By Paul Field (Touchcast) 

  • [they set up a live green screen, he’s running all his slides from his cell phone]
  • It’s easier to talk with people using video, more memorable, more expressive, more human
  • You can show videos, products, documents, polls, surveys, quizzes but also be on the screen yourself to point at things or write on the screen
  • They’ve included instagram style filters but nobody uses them. But of course people would be upset if there were no filters 🙂
  • Bit.ly/touchastlive

Empathy: The Real Killer App for Insights by Katja Cahoon (Beacon) 

  • [game to play: write down all the numbers she will say and answer the questions that are to come]
  • Most people write down the four primary colours, bed/table/chair/desk, and Einstein.  Most people choose the same set of common words due to stress and bias, stereotyped, programmed ways of thinking. It’s hard to break out of them during pressure. It happens so during brainstorming sessions too.
  • You can ask questions a different way and get completely different answers. Questions help you develop empathy.
  • Perspective taking – consider from the perspective of the consumer, do you feel you know everything, have you walked in the consumers shoes, have you worn the adult diapers yourself?
  • Don’t judge – is your team diverse or biased?
  • Recognize the emotion in others – do we truly feel what they’re feeling or are we just measuring it
  • Communicate the emotion and understanding – use cocreation 
  • Get out of the well worn thought pathways and brush aside the stereotypes

How to Drive Smarter Product Decisions with Agile Research by Thor Ernstsson (Alpha)

  • Old research is gated decision making, decisions are irreversible, consensus is required.
  • Agile research is high velocity, decisions are reversible, there is disagreement and committment
  • We aren’t building space ships, it’s basic products
  • The problem is never the idea, most people are in their jobs because they know what they are doing
  • It’s okay to launch small decisions that are wrong and reversible that you can continually improve on
  • Change your bias from planning to acting, change from being comfortably predictable to uncomfortably unpredictable, go from upfront exhaustive research to iterative experimentation
  • Be ruthlessly outcome oriented

Merck Showcase – Eye tracking, Values, and Navigating Controversy #IIeX 

Live notetaking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.
Unlocking consumer insights: Navigating controversy using behavioural sciences to change  the conversation by Lee Carter  and Lisa Courtade

  • Crises are always around us, there is no time to think, we’re always under pressure to think and act immediately
  • It’s never been more difficult to be heard. If you don’t tell the story, someone else will. And they might tell it negatively. 
  • Just because you are right does not mean people will believe you. And often, the facts just don’t matter.
  • We’re always on the defensive. Our attempts to correct the record fail. 
  • Crises are emotional and our messages should be emotional as well. We must engage people before we can persuade them.
  • Just because the message makes US feel better doesn’t mean it’s the right message
  • Impact – how personal and emotional is the impact, what are the priorities that are impacted. What is the impact of healthcare, the soda tax to me personally.
  • Values – what beliefs and fears does the issue raise, what underplaying moral foundation is at play. 
  • Language – what language and rhetoric is being and could be used to address the issue
  • Show people you understand why they are upset, show you want the same things they want, show you’re doing something about it, show there’s always room for improvement
  • This can’t take 18 days like it did for United Air, that hurt the entire airlin industry not just them
  • Messaging is rarely prepared in advance. This slows our response time which is damaging. 
  • We need to be in hero mode, not react mode.

Unlocking insight to foster innovation: a values link journey by Andy Ford and Steve Schafer, Brado Creative Insight

  • Learning interesting things is not insight – insight is fresh intimate understanding that has the power to genuinely change behaviour 
  • “I never knew I always wanted this” this is insight. You can only get to insight with empathy.
  • Need to understand values first so take the time to truly understand the consumer, interview theme to understand who they are and WHY they think what they think
  • How does KFC become a breakfast destination? [I am totally open to chicken and waffles 🙂 ]
  • There are key drivers for breakfast – “my time”. The “first bite” needs to be familiar flavours, smells, and textures, a multi sensory experience to set the tone for the rest of the day. 
  • Consumers want a craveable first bite of breakfast but it still has to be familiar. [I think these people are way more into breakfast than I am. Wow.]

Unlocking attention: how eye tracking is boldly going where no market researchers have gone before by Mike Bartels, Tobii Pro

  • Eye trackers used to be stationary and invasive. Now, they’re just a pair of glasses.
  • Why study visual attention – 50% of all neural tissue is related to vision
  • Eye tracking applies to attention in the workplace, training and skill transfer, fatigue and workload analysis, efficiently and error reduction [this is huge for air traffic control and other high stress jobs that have people’s lives on the line]
  • Use eye tracking along with augmented reality so you can test visibility of retail locations
  • You can learn how much people are actually reading messaging or just taking note of the messaging

Behavioural Science Measurement #IIeX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.  
How the classic fairy tale inspired the mobile ad strategy by Vuk Pavlovic, True Impact (Winner of Best New Speaker at #IIeX Europe)

  • What are good guys? Give to others, honest, helpful, kind, polite. What are bad guys? Uninvited, rude, inconsiderate, force their will, vain, self-serving. Which of these reflects your brand?
  • Brands need to humanize the customer and not treat them like eyeballs with a screen. The mobile environment is personal, their own social network, with their friends, in their bedroom. We need better relationships with brands that are this close to us. 
  • Ads need to be seen – attention, be relevant – receptivity, and be chosen.
  • They tested ads during games. The ads were presented only when they person actively stopped the game to get help.
  • Ads viewed during a more convenient time got more view time, more cognitive engagement
  • People ignore pop=up ads but they do pay attention to ads that play at a convenient time. These ads also perform better after the game is finished.
  • Ads viewed by choice get a 40 second view compared to 9 seconds for interrupting ads. Heatmaps show people are less likely to be looking for the X Close button
  • Annoying ads have more engagement and motivation because they are seeking the X Close button
  • Need to consider the person on the other end of the phone. Don’t force them to change the rotation of their phone. If their phone is vertical, then play the ad vertical.

How Home Depot is optimizing the shopper experience by Dan Braker (Brakethrough research) and Brendan Baby (Home Depot)

  • Inverted pyramid – customer sits at the top of the pyramid, front line associates, field support, corporate support, CEO
  • Use a blend of in store eye tracking, qualitative shop alongs, exit surveys, employee interviews and more to give nagivation behaviours, reasons for behaviours,, experience metrics, operational issues, concept screening
  • Asked shoppers on arrival at the store if they would do their shopping trip with eye tracking glasses. Measure area of interest, time in the area of interest, count of shoppers touching or holding a product, time touching or holding a product.
  • Path tracking watches the path they walked through the store, where do people spend much more or less time, is it due to interest or confusion
  • Can measure pupil dilation for engagement measures, can also measure voice pitch analysis if they talk or ask questions
  • Don’t overlook the employees in your research, they know how shoppers navigate, when shoppers need help
  • Need to use emerging and raditional approaches to maximize learnings
  • Changes to store elements should be thoroughly tested before roll out

Leveraging Artificial Intelligence to do Real-time fan research during NASCAR’s biggest race by Brooks Denton (NASCAR) and Andrew Konya (Remesh)

  • Time with friends, cooking and eating, arguments about strategy, social media, ad consumption all together equals the experience
  • Asked a set of questions throughout the race, like a live bulletin board, to collect qualitaive data. Choose a few responses that best reflect the full range of responses and match those with segments and demographics
  •  Build a distribution of opinion for each answer, create a consensus for each answer 
  • Sometimes they show the live responses to people answering the questions to increase engagement and other times they don’t show the other resposnses to maintain research rigour
  • Viewers want split screen commercials, the data proves this and now they can bring that data to the broadcast partners 

The automation of behavioural science by Aaron Reid (Sentient Decision Science)

  • Some associates are hard wired (attractive person, babies) or learned (police cars, spiders)
  • Can you differentiate fear of spiders and spiders using sweat in the hand, do you sweat more for one or the other
  • Automation is a major trend in survey design, push button question types and dashboard reporting, full study design is becoming automated, tracking analysis is automated, regression analysis can be automated [I really hope that a person monitors all of these things because humans creating data are not robots]
  • STICKY does eye tracking online not in the lab, it may not be great right now but we improve so quickly that it’s worth it to get in early
  • We need to automate the science so that cientists can wok on theory, discussion, ideas not button pushing. This gives us time to work on the importat parts. Gives you time to increase empathy for people and brands.

https://vimeo.com/207500225

VR, AR, and Future Tech with Vanguard, Isobar, and SciFutures #IIeX #MRX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors or typos are my own.

Adding innovative techniques to a researcher’s toolbox by Julie Mon, Vanguard

  • They use research companies from among our midst but also a lot of other providers who don’t call themselves researchers.
  • Research used to happen top down, and only show it to clients once the research was  polished. Now they talk to clients first, and then involve the businesseses afterwards.
  • They use IDIs, diary studies, ethnography, eye-tracking, surveys, card sorts, click tests, tree tests, but also newer techniques like design sprints, lean startup, design thinking from user experience research
  • Design thinking: empathize, analyze, synthesis, envision. They used small sample sizes, 6 per region across the country. They started broad and asked general questions about people’s lives and goals, how they organize their money. 
  • Design sprints started with research and brainstorming and in total took 2 or 3 days. They started with competitive research and then brough in ideas from design thinking stage. They came up with a prototype and built a wireframe and then tested a handwritten wireframe with clients. 
  • Collected contextual, heart breaking and heart warming stories around the research that people still talk about. 

Translating emotion science into digital experiences by Jeremy Pincus, Isobar

  • Traditional copy testing measures attitude toward the brand, purchase, recall, memories. But this is not in the moment. It’s highly rational and people in action aren’t rational.
  • Normal biometrics are facial coding but you cant see the face in VR. Google daydream helps but it’s only a simulation of a face, not their real face. Normal eye tracking won’t work. Many of these technologies hide much of your face.
  • Use heart rate, galvanic skin response and other techniques that get right at your physiology. 
  • Measure attention (heart rate, GSR), attention (facial), arousal.

Is there room for science fiction prototyping in the research industry by Ari Popper, SciFutures

  • Early tech is deceptively disappointing.
  • Superpowers – superhomes are adaptive, responsive, learning, insightful. AI will make our homes become extensions of ourselves. What real time data will we get from these homes. 
  • Superhumans – sense no visible light, radio waves, current, magnetic fields, photons, radiation
  • Supermobility – autonomous driving and implications for impulse purchases, decreasing use of convenience stores, road infrastructure, insurance
  • Robots and AI – Lowes has a robot customer service function, they speak 20 languages, can help you find anything in the store, monitor story inventory
  • B2A – business to algorithm [watch this term people!] Robots might become another form of civil struggle and rights. Will you outsource all your decision making to AI?
  • Futuristic product placement – fedex delivery robot, Taco Bell tablets, the shoe in Back to the Future
  • Prototyping in VR – model realistic environments and products and then do research to get the biometrics and emotional measures
  • Grocery store before AR, but after Augmented Reality every package will be messagedexactly to you, also the price and colours. We’ll know exactly every item that was touched or looked at or pushed aside. VR hacks the brain and transports you to a different environment.  It is improving FAST.
  • Imagine testing a new shopping experience with little kids in tow, or cleaning a bathroom twice the size of your own.
  • [Really nice talk to help you get up to speed in these new technologies.]

Get inspired at #IIeX – culture and consumption #MRX #NewMR 

Live notetaking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.
Culture: Blue coean or black swan, by Grant McCracken, Culturematic

  • Organizations exist in a state of perpetual surprise – Peter Schwartz
  • Where does disruption come from? It’s hard to detect it went it beings and it’s hard to detect danger.
  • Should we factor culture into our considerations? Of course, yes.
  • Bitters remained out of fashion for a very long time until the mixology reevolution in California. Sales spiked.
  • But data spikes all the time so how do you distinguish noise from signal?
  • We’ve seen a spike in hard soda recently [yuck. Don’t mess with my root beer!] Does this mean the end of mixology?
  • Social data is great for politics but not so great for culture. Political supporters live in their own worlds on twitter, they are completely separated.
  • On the other hand, Google trends tracked the love of goats and goat cheese and the loss of the south beach diet. You can watch markets on Amazon, google, and etsy to learn how and where a trend is changing.
  • We need to factor culture into the mix, like a weather map, show the changes in motion, make predictions about where and how fast they’re changing.

Macro Matters; Looking forward to the future context of consumption, by J. Walker Smith

  • The third age of consumption, just coming out of an age of unlimited expectations and promises, everything could be overcome. But now we are bumping up against capacity.
  • Aspirations of lifestyles are now changing. Live large, carry little. We want to live as big a life as possible but without all the badge of the past – less stuff, less upkeep, less hassle, less debt, but no decrease in enjoyment. THis is because of constraints of capacity.
  • Cognitive capacity – absorbing and processing the entire marketplace is impossible.  Fragment nation (white paper). People are trying to keep up and marketing activities have skyrocketed. We are outstripping capacity of consumers to keep up. People feel like we are stalking them online. And we are. 
  • Economic capacity – defying gravity (white paper). 
  • Resource capacity – planet cannot support more growth happening the way we’ve done it before. Global warming is a capacity we’ve lost. There are 8 other capacities and we are risking those too.
  • Third age of consumption – growth, value, competitive edge are driven by relationships, experiences, and algorithms. People don’t want the product, they want the benefit. We need to decouple products and benefits. People don’t want to connect with brands and logos. They want to connect with people. People want algorithms from marketing to find the right fit. Now we need to advertise to algorithms. 
  • After the war, people had no stuff and they wanted stuff. A couple decades after that, we switched to wanting experiences. Now we are in a social market place. The locus of value has changed. 
  • Uprising of allegiances – pundits think America is falling apart but this is false. America has never been more connected and networked than today. It looks different and has sharper elbows but there is more focus on allegiances than ever before.
  • [He is really an impassioned speaker! And, he uses notes effectively. You CAN use notes as a speaker and do an awesome talk.]

Essential Behavioral Science Lessons for a Complex Marketing World by Dan Young, Chief Behavioural Scientist, Hotspex

Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

  • System 1 and System 2 processes are different. System 1 is intuition, feeling, action. System 2 is thinking, deciding and action. Both are always active.
  • Model used to be think, do, feel.
  • Reality is feel, act, think.
  • We can give reasonable and logical answers if you ask, we believe these answers are true.
  • Learning to drive is system 2. Over time, parts of learning to drive go into system 1. Most is automatic. You do it even when you’re listening to the radio and talking to your passenger. You still made thousands of decisions over the ride, they’re done on autopilot. However, if you’re in rainstorm, you tell people to shut up and you’re back to system 2 processing.
  • Emotions drive perceptions, thinking, and behaviour.
  • If it feels right, you do it. If it doesn’t feel right, you don’t do it. It doens’t feel right so you think about it.
  • What people tell you they do doesn’t have a lot to do with what they actually do.
  • People don’t realize something is difficult because they’ve accommodated for it, and they don’t remember that it was difficult to do.
  • Know what to say versus what to convey. Talk about happy healthy babies, not saving time by using disposable diapers. It gets processed at the wrong level – diapers mean lazy mom.
  • Michelin tires – pair a babies safety with tires. “Show babies in your tires.” Tires are a safety point. Link it tothe safety of your family. The Michelin man  has big eyes like a baby’s, he’s soft and cuddly, he links to love and care which gets associated with your brand.
  • Dawn dish detergent is gentle enough to clean a baby duck. Now you halo love and caring, effectiveness onto the brand. An emotional connection of sensitivity. 
  • Coca-cola uses cute polar bears. You can’t say everything with humans but you can animate those things. Moms can’t hand a coke to their babies but a polar bear can.
  • Dove ad campaign with different sized women – real beauty is more than skin deep. It almost doubled their business. Can project yourself in an ad, all women are attractive even though they all have different shapes and sizes. Extend campaign to bottle shapes. Why did this go off the rails?  [mrs butterworths is my bottle shape. LOL!]  The bottle was system 2 but the estate was system 1. 
  • Special K is consciously known for skinny and healthy, but system 1 research says it’s actually known for social pressure and insecure, You don’t eat this cereal to feel better about yourself. They need a different strategy. They need to celebrate inner strength. Talk about you being great as you are. Become a better version of you. The new strategy is “dont just eat it, own it.”
  • Need to focus on the positive. Tap into underlying feelings in a positive and acceptable way.
  • Say and convey requires consistency, context, and change. 
  • Every brand manager wants to make a mark on their brand. But consumers want consistency. Consumers want to feel familiar, like you’re family. 
  • Lego is just bricks but now it’s all about kits. Took simple idea and stayed true to it even across games and movies. The Lego movie shows Lego characters moving like Lego people actually move. It is consistent. 
  • Is there such a thing as a blind test? Everything has context no matter how much you try to remove it. 
  • Dirty washing clean _______
  • Spoon bowl chicken ________
  • You will say soap or soup depending on which list of words you saw. Everything has unconscious experiences pushing it. 
  • The world is always changing and brands need to evolve. But you need to understand what brands stands for at conscious and unconscious level. We need to tap into explicit AND implicit measurements. 
  • Virgin records went from records to airlines becuase the label is about style and vibe. You have to understand your core equity and maintain it.
  • Oprah went from TV shows to magazines because they considered her equity. 

How to make brands and research visible #MRIA2017 

Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 annual conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes ar my own.

How to Make Research Visible
Andrea Sharkey, Senior Manager of Market Insights, CBC

  • AAA available accessible appetizing 
  • Available – can’t be on a schedule, needs to be on our terms not theirs, how can we be the Netflix of data
  • Accessible – bite-size, makes sense to the user, understandable, dashboards let people ask the questions they want and everyone gets the same access to that data, no silos of different data. Everyone works with the same set of data therefore all data matches. Executive summaries are always available.
  • Appetizing – visually appealing to clients. Most people use PowerPoint. Some of the best stories have pictures. Use a graphic designer to make everything clean and readable. Good data won’t just stand on its own.
  • Find the right tool to share your data. It doesn’t aways have to be PowerPoint. 
  • Rethink your results. Stories are told differently with dashboards. Ppt means you control the story and you dictate what people pay attention to.  People might start at the end of a story when they use a dashboard. Dashboards free your time but they might affect the understanding of the story. Maybe add some invites into the email so they know what to focus on. Produce the huge reports for people who need it and give them the dashboard. Find the right balance.
  • Be willing to evolve, willing to pivot. Solve concerns along the way 

How to Avoid the Pitfalls of Brand Positioning

Johanna Faigelman, Founding Partner and CEO, Human Branding Inc., Sarah McNab, Partner and CSO, Human Branding Inc.

  • Have you experienced having the wrong target in mind, ignored the power of an established positioning, positioned too focused on the product
  • Companies assume everyone will be very excited about their product, hard to be objective, that’s why outside suppliers help to bring objectivity
  • Everyday consumers did not perceive a need for google glass, and professionals and B2B who did have a need were not a priority. Main ebenfit was it’s handsfree format. Positioned as for the general public but they didn’t see a broad need – entertaining breastfeeding moms whose hands are full is not a large market. They should have targeted police officers who need recording while hands free, etc.
  • Target store positioned incorrectly. Canadians expected it to be the same in canada as in the USA – get a lot more for less and make sure the shelves are stocked. But target didn’t respect their positioning.  Need to know your established brand so build trust and loyalty, leverage equity.  
  • Positioning is too product focused. Why do you need an emotional benefit when the product is so good. Being too functional is more about problem solving and not brand building. Competition can replace or improve on functional beenefits leaving a brand in the dust.  You CAN talk about the performance of a sneaker to enhance athletic performance.  Adidas looked at trends of casualness as a cultural shift in order to grow the size and appeal of their brand. Leveraged the athleisure trend. Create a cult status for your brand. 
  • Anthropology is teh study of human behavior and culture, and is completely applicable to marketing research,
  • [ICEBERG ALERT!  🙂 ]
  • Set the context. What is the right target and what makes them tick. Understand the motivations. Identify the white space.
  • Understand the rational and emotional hot buttons. Do laddering based on a range of proactive statements, imagery, archetypes to pull out what is inherent in this brand.
  • Need the Premise, promise, and proof in the positioning statement.
  • Don’t stay in the space where you think the answers are. Go outside the space, push it.

Questionning mobile methods and contradictory data #MRIA2017 

Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in toronto. Any  errors or bad jokes are my own.

Bridging the Survey vs. Sales Data Disconnect

Mariangelica Rodriguez, Consumer Insights Manager, PepsiCo Beverages Canada, William Pink, Chairman, Kantar Millward Brown – Marketing Science Council

  • The difference between what people say and do can be large, especially when you match opinions to home scan data
  • This type of data can get hidden because marketers don’t know how to deal with it
  • Is something in the system broken? 
  • Is there a better and different approach to monitor brand performance. What signals should be measured in the short term? Is an ongoing tracker survey necessary? How do you evolve from a survey mindset to a connected data intelligence mindset?
  • Businesses want speed to insight, connected data, less asking and more observing, migration from descriptive to prescriptive, more accurate and granular understanding
  • Need faster decision making, quarterly used to be frequent but now we need days or minutes
  • Data should never be treated in a vacuum disregarding all other pieces of data
  • Consider setting up alerts for when data moves outside a defined margin
  • We may live in a survey first world but its surround first and survey second – use search and social data for signals of campaign impact and brand strength
  • Use intuitive associations, speed of response tests to understand how people feel about brands ad services, tells a completely different story than surveys [I LOVE implicit data because people can’t and don’t want to tell you the truth]

Swipe Right > T2B: How Incorporating User Design from Tinder and Uber Can Improve Mobile Research

Kevin Hare, Vice President, Dig Insights Inc.

  • Mobile devices have matured – swipes, menu stacks, pinch to zoom. Consumers have a new set of behaviours to indicate preferences and make decisions.
  • 19% of surveys are mobile optimized, 55% have bad design that leads ot poor survey experience  [it is SHOCKING that we choose to do this.]
  1. Tinder is a dating app with simple interface – swipe left or right. You can swipe right or left on products too. Or on features, brands, services. Intuitive interest is a quick swipe right.  Considered interest means you read the description first. Intuitive rejection means a quick swipe left. Considered rejection means you read it then reject it. Process is intuitive. Survey questions often correlate which means you’re asking too many questions. This method helps that problem. Can replicate box scores with this data. Can also do network maps and correspondent maps.
  2. Chatbots. Way to access information, make decisions, and communicate. Beginning of a new form of digital access. People spend most of their time on just five downloaded apps. Conversation is a natural user interface. Not much too learn. AI tools aren’t perfect but they are exploding. 80% of people like the experience which is 4 times more than survey numbers.
  3. Google maps.  Your phone defaults to tracking you.  Google can make much of this information available to you via APIs.  Use it to track purchases. Pick the date you went shopping, identify how you paid. Then go to google maps and choose the location you went to.  Helps with recall, you can check the map to see where you were that day. Engaging map deliverables for your clients.
  4. Ratings. Feedback loops from simple five start rating system returns many metrics on how to improve service.  Use a system like this at end of survey. Give a star rating. Give a few easy prompts for what did you like or dislike. This is how uber does it, also hotel ratings. Step 1, choose overal satisfaction. Step 2, choose the satisfied features. Step 3, choose the dissatisfied features.

Bridging the Marketing & Research Chasm

Neil Rennert, Marketing Research and Consumer Insights Manager, Canada Dry Mott’s, Juliann Ng, Vice President Consulting, GfK

  • Ask a question three ways – from the client perspective (e.g., to get a bonus), from the business perspective, from the research perspective. 
  • “A more beautiful question” book to consider reading
  • We’re sort of trained to just answer the question, don’t challenge the question. The questions you asked are shaped by your experiences. 
  • Try asking ‘why’ a few more times, not just once or twice. 
  • Think about opening and closing. Close an open ended question and you’ll get a brand new perspective. You could get contradictory answers. 
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