VR, AR, and Future Tech with Vanguard, Isobar, and SciFutures #IIeX #MRX 

Live note taking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors or typos are my own.

Adding innovative techniques to a researcher’s toolbox by Julie Mon, Vanguard

  • They use research companies from among our midst but also a lot of other providers who don’t call themselves researchers.
  • Research used to happen top down, and only show it to clients once the research was  polished. Now they talk to clients first, and then involve the businesseses afterwards.
  • They use IDIs, diary studies, ethnography, eye-tracking, surveys, card sorts, click tests, tree tests, but also newer techniques like design sprints, lean startup, design thinking from user experience research
  • Design thinking: empathize, analyze, synthesis, envision. They used small sample sizes, 6 per region across the country. They started broad and asked general questions about people’s lives and goals, how they organize their money. 
  • Design sprints started with research and brainstorming and in total took 2 or 3 days. They started with competitive research and then brough in ideas from design thinking stage. They came up with a prototype and built a wireframe and then tested a handwritten wireframe with clients. 
  • Collected contextual, heart breaking and heart warming stories around the research that people still talk about. 

Translating emotion science into digital experiences by Jeremy Pincus, Isobar

  • Traditional copy testing measures attitude toward the brand, purchase, recall, memories. But this is not in the moment. It’s highly rational and people in action aren’t rational.
  • Normal biometrics are facial coding but you cant see the face in VR. Google daydream helps but it’s only a simulation of a face, not their real face. Normal eye tracking won’t work. Many of these technologies hide much of your face.
  • Use heart rate, galvanic skin response and other techniques that get right at your physiology. 
  • Measure attention (heart rate, GSR), attention (facial), arousal.

Is there room for science fiction prototyping in the research industry by Ari Popper, SciFutures

  • Early tech is deceptively disappointing.
  • Superpowers – superhomes are adaptive, responsive, learning, insightful. AI will make our homes become extensions of ourselves. What real time data will we get from these homes. 
  • Superhumans – sense no visible light, radio waves, current, magnetic fields, photons, radiation
  • Supermobility – autonomous driving and implications for impulse purchases, decreasing use of convenience stores, road infrastructure, insurance
  • Robots and AI – Lowes has a robot customer service function, they speak 20 languages, can help you find anything in the store, monitor story inventory
  • B2A – business to algorithm [watch this term people!] Robots might become another form of civil struggle and rights. Will you outsource all your decision making to AI?
  • Futuristic product placement – fedex delivery robot, Taco Bell tablets, the shoe in Back to the Future
  • Prototyping in VR – model realistic environments and products and then do research to get the biometrics and emotional measures
  • Grocery store before AR, but after Augmented Reality every package will be messagedexactly to you, also the price and colours. We’ll know exactly every item that was touched or looked at or pushed aside. VR hacks the brain and transports you to a different environment.  It is improving FAST.
  • Imagine testing a new shopping experience with little kids in tow, or cleaning a bathroom twice the size of your own.
  • [Really nice talk to help you get up to speed in these new technologies.]

Get inspired at #IIeX – culture and consumption #MRX #NewMR 

Live notetaking at the #IIeX conference in Atlanta. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.
Culture: Blue coean or black swan, by Grant McCracken, Culturematic

  • Organizations exist in a state of perpetual surprise – Peter Schwartz
  • Where does disruption come from? It’s hard to detect it went it beings and it’s hard to detect danger.
  • Should we factor culture into our considerations? Of course, yes.
  • Bitters remained out of fashion for a very long time until the mixology reevolution in California. Sales spiked.
  • But data spikes all the time so how do you distinguish noise from signal?
  • We’ve seen a spike in hard soda recently [yuck. Don’t mess with my root beer!] Does this mean the end of mixology?
  • Social data is great for politics but not so great for culture. Political supporters live in their own worlds on twitter, they are completely separated.
  • On the other hand, Google trends tracked the love of goats and goat cheese and the loss of the south beach diet. You can watch markets on Amazon, google, and etsy to learn how and where a trend is changing.
  • We need to factor culture into the mix, like a weather map, show the changes in motion, make predictions about where and how fast they’re changing.

Macro Matters; Looking forward to the future context of consumption, by J. Walker Smith

  • The third age of consumption, just coming out of an age of unlimited expectations and promises, everything could be overcome. But now we are bumping up against capacity.
  • Aspirations of lifestyles are now changing. Live large, carry little. We want to live as big a life as possible but without all the badge of the past – less stuff, less upkeep, less hassle, less debt, but no decrease in enjoyment. THis is because of constraints of capacity.
  • Cognitive capacity – absorbing and processing the entire marketplace is impossible.  Fragment nation (white paper). People are trying to keep up and marketing activities have skyrocketed. We are outstripping capacity of consumers to keep up. People feel like we are stalking them online. And we are. 
  • Economic capacity – defying gravity (white paper). 
  • Resource capacity – planet cannot support more growth happening the way we’ve done it before. Global warming is a capacity we’ve lost. There are 8 other capacities and we are risking those too.
  • Third age of consumption – growth, value, competitive edge are driven by relationships, experiences, and algorithms. People don’t want the product, they want the benefit. We need to decouple products and benefits. People don’t want to connect with brands and logos. They want to connect with people. People want algorithms from marketing to find the right fit. Now we need to advertise to algorithms. 
  • After the war, people had no stuff and they wanted stuff. A couple decades after that, we switched to wanting experiences. Now we are in a social market place. The locus of value has changed. 
  • Uprising of allegiances – pundits think America is falling apart but this is false. America has never been more connected and networked than today. It looks different and has sharper elbows but there is more focus on allegiances than ever before.
  • [He is really an impassioned speaker! And, he uses notes effectively. You CAN use notes as a speaker and do an awesome talk.]

Essential Behavioral Science Lessons for a Complex Marketing World by Dan Young, Chief Behavioural Scientist, Hotspex

Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

  • System 1 and System 2 processes are different. System 1 is intuition, feeling, action. System 2 is thinking, deciding and action. Both are always active.
  • Model used to be think, do, feel.
  • Reality is feel, act, think.
  • We can give reasonable and logical answers if you ask, we believe these answers are true.
  • Learning to drive is system 2. Over time, parts of learning to drive go into system 1. Most is automatic. You do it even when you’re listening to the radio and talking to your passenger. You still made thousands of decisions over the ride, they’re done on autopilot. However, if you’re in rainstorm, you tell people to shut up and you’re back to system 2 processing.
  • Emotions drive perceptions, thinking, and behaviour.
  • If it feels right, you do it. If it doesn’t feel right, you don’t do it. It doens’t feel right so you think about it.
  • What people tell you they do doesn’t have a lot to do with what they actually do.
  • People don’t realize something is difficult because they’ve accommodated for it, and they don’t remember that it was difficult to do.
  • Know what to say versus what to convey. Talk about happy healthy babies, not saving time by using disposable diapers. It gets processed at the wrong level – diapers mean lazy mom.
  • Michelin tires – pair a babies safety with tires. “Show babies in your tires.” Tires are a safety point. Link it tothe safety of your family. The Michelin man  has big eyes like a baby’s, he’s soft and cuddly, he links to love and care which gets associated with your brand.
  • Dawn dish detergent is gentle enough to clean a baby duck. Now you halo love and caring, effectiveness onto the brand. An emotional connection of sensitivity. 
  • Coca-cola uses cute polar bears. You can’t say everything with humans but you can animate those things. Moms can’t hand a coke to their babies but a polar bear can.
  • Dove ad campaign with different sized women – real beauty is more than skin deep. It almost doubled their business. Can project yourself in an ad, all women are attractive even though they all have different shapes and sizes. Extend campaign to bottle shapes. Why did this go off the rails?  [mrs butterworths is my bottle shape. LOL!]  The bottle was system 2 but the estate was system 1. 
  • Special K is consciously known for skinny and healthy, but system 1 research says it’s actually known for social pressure and insecure, You don’t eat this cereal to feel better about yourself. They need a different strategy. They need to celebrate inner strength. Talk about you being great as you are. Become a better version of you. The new strategy is “dont just eat it, own it.”
  • Need to focus on the positive. Tap into underlying feelings in a positive and acceptable way.
  • Say and convey requires consistency, context, and change. 
  • Every brand manager wants to make a mark on their brand. But consumers want consistency. Consumers want to feel familiar, like you’re family. 
  • Lego is just bricks but now it’s all about kits. Took simple idea and stayed true to it even across games and movies. The Lego movie shows Lego characters moving like Lego people actually move. It is consistent. 
  • Is there such a thing as a blind test? Everything has context no matter how much you try to remove it. 
  • Dirty washing clean _______
  • Spoon bowl chicken ________
  • You will say soap or soup depending on which list of words you saw. Everything has unconscious experiences pushing it. 
  • The world is always changing and brands need to evolve. But you need to understand what brands stands for at conscious and unconscious level. We need to tap into explicit AND implicit measurements. 
  • Virgin records went from records to airlines becuase the label is about style and vibe. You have to understand your core equity and maintain it.
  • Oprah went from TV shows to magazines because they considered her equity. 

How to make brands and research visible #MRIA2017 

Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 annual conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes ar my own.

How to Make Research Visible
Andrea Sharkey, Senior Manager of Market Insights, CBC

  • AAA available accessible appetizing 
  • Available – can’t be on a schedule, needs to be on our terms not theirs, how can we be the Netflix of data
  • Accessible – bite-size, makes sense to the user, understandable, dashboards let people ask the questions they want and everyone gets the same access to that data, no silos of different data. Everyone works with the same set of data therefore all data matches. Executive summaries are always available.
  • Appetizing – visually appealing to clients. Most people use PowerPoint. Some of the best stories have pictures. Use a graphic designer to make everything clean and readable. Good data won’t just stand on its own.
  • Find the right tool to share your data. It doesn’t aways have to be PowerPoint. 
  • Rethink your results. Stories are told differently with dashboards. Ppt means you control the story and you dictate what people pay attention to.  People might start at the end of a story when they use a dashboard. Dashboards free your time but they might affect the understanding of the story. Maybe add some invites into the email so they know what to focus on. Produce the huge reports for people who need it and give them the dashboard. Find the right balance.
  • Be willing to evolve, willing to pivot. Solve concerns along the way 

How to Avoid the Pitfalls of Brand Positioning

Johanna Faigelman, Founding Partner and CEO, Human Branding Inc., Sarah McNab, Partner and CSO, Human Branding Inc.

  • Have you experienced having the wrong target in mind, ignored the power of an established positioning, positioned too focused on the product
  • Companies assume everyone will be very excited about their product, hard to be objective, that’s why outside suppliers help to bring objectivity
  • Everyday consumers did not perceive a need for google glass, and professionals and B2B who did have a need were not a priority. Main ebenfit was it’s handsfree format. Positioned as for the general public but they didn’t see a broad need – entertaining breastfeeding moms whose hands are full is not a large market. They should have targeted police officers who need recording while hands free, etc.
  • Target store positioned incorrectly. Canadians expected it to be the same in canada as in the USA – get a lot more for less and make sure the shelves are stocked. But target didn’t respect their positioning.  Need to know your established brand so build trust and loyalty, leverage equity.  
  • Positioning is too product focused. Why do you need an emotional benefit when the product is so good. Being too functional is more about problem solving and not brand building. Competition can replace or improve on functional beenefits leaving a brand in the dust.  You CAN talk about the performance of a sneaker to enhance athletic performance.  Adidas looked at trends of casualness as a cultural shift in order to grow the size and appeal of their brand. Leveraged the athleisure trend. Create a cult status for your brand. 
  • Anthropology is teh study of human behavior and culture, and is completely applicable to marketing research,
  • [ICEBERG ALERT!  🙂 ]
  • Set the context. What is the right target and what makes them tick. Understand the motivations. Identify the white space.
  • Understand the rational and emotional hot buttons. Do laddering based on a range of proactive statements, imagery, archetypes to pull out what is inherent in this brand.
  • Need the Premise, promise, and proof in the positioning statement.
  • Don’t stay in the space where you think the answers are. Go outside the space, push it.

Questionning mobile methods and contradictory data #MRIA2017 

Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in toronto. Any  errors or bad jokes are my own.

Bridging the Survey vs. Sales Data Disconnect

Mariangelica Rodriguez, Consumer Insights Manager, PepsiCo Beverages Canada, William Pink, Chairman, Kantar Millward Brown – Marketing Science Council

  • The difference between what people say and do can be large, especially when you match opinions to home scan data
  • This type of data can get hidden because marketers don’t know how to deal with it
  • Is something in the system broken? 
  • Is there a better and different approach to monitor brand performance. What signals should be measured in the short term? Is an ongoing tracker survey necessary? How do you evolve from a survey mindset to a connected data intelligence mindset?
  • Businesses want speed to insight, connected data, less asking and more observing, migration from descriptive to prescriptive, more accurate and granular understanding
  • Need faster decision making, quarterly used to be frequent but now we need days or minutes
  • Data should never be treated in a vacuum disregarding all other pieces of data
  • Consider setting up alerts for when data moves outside a defined margin
  • We may live in a survey first world but its surround first and survey second – use search and social data for signals of campaign impact and brand strength
  • Use intuitive associations, speed of response tests to understand how people feel about brands ad services, tells a completely different story than surveys [I LOVE implicit data because people can’t and don’t want to tell you the truth]

Swipe Right > T2B: How Incorporating User Design from Tinder and Uber Can Improve Mobile Research

Kevin Hare, Vice President, Dig Insights Inc.

  • Mobile devices have matured – swipes, menu stacks, pinch to zoom. Consumers have a new set of behaviours to indicate preferences and make decisions.
  • 19% of surveys are mobile optimized, 55% have bad design that leads ot poor survey experience  [it is SHOCKING that we choose to do this.]
  1. Tinder is a dating app with simple interface – swipe left or right. You can swipe right or left on products too. Or on features, brands, services. Intuitive interest is a quick swipe right.  Considered interest means you read the description first. Intuitive rejection means a quick swipe left. Considered rejection means you read it then reject it. Process is intuitive. Survey questions often correlate which means you’re asking too many questions. This method helps that problem. Can replicate box scores with this data. Can also do network maps and correspondent maps.
  2. Chatbots. Way to access information, make decisions, and communicate. Beginning of a new form of digital access. People spend most of their time on just five downloaded apps. Conversation is a natural user interface. Not much too learn. AI tools aren’t perfect but they are exploding. 80% of people like the experience which is 4 times more than survey numbers.
  3. Google maps.  Your phone defaults to tracking you.  Google can make much of this information available to you via APIs.  Use it to track purchases. Pick the date you went shopping, identify how you paid. Then go to google maps and choose the location you went to.  Helps with recall, you can check the map to see where you were that day. Engaging map deliverables for your clients.
  4. Ratings. Feedback loops from simple five start rating system returns many metrics on how to improve service.  Use a system like this at end of survey. Give a star rating. Give a few easy prompts for what did you like or dislike. This is how uber does it, also hotel ratings. Step 1, choose overal satisfaction. Step 2, choose the satisfied features. Step 3, choose the dissatisfied features.

Bridging the Marketing & Research Chasm

Neil Rennert, Marketing Research and Consumer Insights Manager, Canada Dry Mott’s, Juliann Ng, Vice President Consulting, GfK

  • Ask a question three ways – from the client perspective (e.g., to get a bonus), from the business perspective, from the research perspective. 
  • “A more beautiful question” book to consider reading
  • We’re sort of trained to just answer the question, don’t challenge the question. The questions you asked are shaped by your experiences. 
  • Try asking ‘why’ a few more times, not just once or twice. 
  • Think about opening and closing. Close an open ended question and you’ll get a brand new perspective. You could get contradictory answers. 

Navigating The New Insights Landscape by Simon Chadwick, Cambiar, #MRIA2017 

Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in Toronto. Any errors or typos are my own.

Navigating The New Insights Landscape

Simon Chadwick, Managing Partner, Cambiar; Chairperson, Insights Association

  • Change is here and the industry is in the midst of the sot rapid transformation it has every seen
  • Most conferences talk about how technology has pushed the change forward. Tech is the enabler. An amazing enabler. Let’s us do the things we’ve done before in an affordable faster way.
  • Clients are pushing the change. CLients dictate what our industry looks like.
  • Decades ago, major agencies spawned new agencies as people left and set up their own agencies in an entrepreneurial way, there were few barriers to entry, you just needed a new idea or way of thinking, or they got a first follower. Today’s being names came up that way.
  • Now clients must do far more with far less. People used to make their money from annuity income – trackers, A&U studies, big studies, big clients, a with big relationships. You could count on the money coming through the door. However, those are the areas that clients are reducing or dropping. Can’t count on this money now.
  • Clients want to spend more on data integration, analystics, digital ad optimization, customer journey, path to purchase, most of which demand tech and we must learn those. These technologies belong to people who seem to be outside our industry.
  • Collection of data, creating insights form the data, translate that into business decisions, supporting those business decisions – the four core business areas of research
  • Our core business is incredibly fragmented, quant, qual, panel, DIY, mobile, communities, ethnography, mystery shopping, mobservational, etc
  • Half of research suppliers did not exist ten years ago, this is incredible, it is due to tech.
  • Funded by 14 billion in new capital, much of it for big data platforms in 2012. Gave way to social media, then web, then mobile analytics, and now predictive. Huge wave shifts on a yearly basis.
  • Private equity is now funding much of these, safe, solid, can be grown. They are concerned with growing the companies. 
  • Large enterprises are being bought to consolidate and add to, and create larger enterprises that they can take to public markets. 
  • Now we have public, private, venture capital, private equity, and corporate companies.
  • Now it’s an uneven playing field with a huge amount of money. Our industry is not used to this.  You wouldn’t realize our industry have tons of cash but we do.
  • BIG research acquires innovation and consolidates. Big analytics is organic innovation and consolidation. Small analytics is top line growth and survival. Automation is share growth, disruption, and exit planning. New MR is gaining niche acceptance, survive by being clever. Small MR is like with like mergers, and partnerships. 
  • [he encourages us to attend the qualtrics concert] Qualtrics is like a Star Trek conventions is massive fans
  • This all affects how you reward people, how you innovate, and what your ultimate goals are. You should know about your competitors and vendors work.
  • Shifting revenue mix matters to associations.  Pool of members is shrinking. Pool of potential members is growing. Associations must expand the tent. 
  • Insights association has 9 separate segments that need to be addressed. Voice of client must be heard loud by the association.  They still need to meet client needs. Chapters are vital because they allow us to deliver cross education and networking we need. 
  • Tech and researchers need to cross education – do analytics companies understand th ended for associations, the benefits we bring them. Probably they don’t until a problem with security or privacy happens. 
  • What does education look like? How do we education VC and PE on industry issues. How does political cliemate of your own and other countries affect industry?

 Using Words to Measure Emotions: The Secret to Cracking the Quebec Code Grand Ballroom #MRIA2017 

Live note-taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Christian Bourque, Executive Vice President and Senior Partner, Leger, Doris Juergens, National Vice President of Strategy and Partner, NATIONAL Public Relations 

  • ‘Rest of Canada’ doesn’t exist, except to Quebecers
  • Are quebecers closer to France, English canada, or the USA? Data says those three equally. They are North American, they are french. THey do drink more alcohol, they do spend more on hygiene products.
  • Research asked people to choose words, how do they react to a variety of words.
  • French Quebec overindexes on tenderness, ingenuity, sensual, emotion, tolderance, warmth.  
  • Quebecers are less different than they think – they are identical on 70% of variables.  But the other 30% is huge. THey are more different than marketers think.
  • Joie de vivre is a huge difference. It belongs to francophones. They want to live in the moment, 30% more than anglophones. Financial literacy is poor in Quebec. Doing what I want dominates over doing the right thing in Quebec. They are about right here, right now, make the fullest of the present moment’.
  • ‘Enjoy yogurt’ would be English. “Orgasm yogurt’ would be quebecers – [yeah, the translation doesn’t work 🙂 ]
  • Canadians are yay-Sayers and quebecers are to the nth degree – they always say ‘yes but’
  • Quebecers donate less, volunteer less, more non-commital, more talk than action
  • Victim perspective, never responsible for their own destiny, it’s always someone else’s fault – this is why they’re more suspicious, non-committal 
  • Biggest fear is failure
  • Men are systematically depicted as idiots in advertising and no one says anything about it. It wouldn’t work n English market.
  • Parochialism – most older people come from small villages, small is beautiful, you know everyone, quebecers like to come together in small groups. Most want one of three Quebec stations. Top shows are produced in Quebec. THey want tto watch themselves, support themselves.
  • Don’t tell them you’re the best and biggest. You need to have humility, Use local spokespeople because they want to put a face on everything. President’s Choice wasn’t popular until the face of the brand was Gaylen Weston. You need french names, add a local face.
  • Coops and mutuals are very important – they reflect people coming together.
  • They are more instinctive, creative. They don’t hold levers of power so they have to make something out of nothing – creative, rebellious. 
  • They invented peanut butter!
  • Quebecers are prideful even though they feel they are victims. 20% intend to start their own business, up from 7% less than ten years ago.
  • Court of public opinion in Quebec is HUGELY important. INcluding mayors of cities with a few hundred people. They will pressure the Quebec which is called the national government. And they will put pressure on the federal govt. They will make any issue local and personal. 
  • Village first, then region, then province. 
  • You cannot use subtitles. You must translate and dub for Quebec french.
  • Consider using your own employees or customers, people with solid french names from the community
  • People will spot anything that suggests an ad that isn’t from Quebec and then not be convinced about the brand
  • Establish a relationship with people to give them a reason to like you

#MRIA2017 Panel: Is your Data C-Suite Ready

Live note-taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Panel – Is Your Data C-Suite Ready? Transforming Insights into Market and Business Intelligence

Moderated by: Beth Rounds, CMO, Dapresy

Panelists: Amy Davies, Head of Insights, Acklands-Grainger, Lisa de Lima, Associate Director of Market Research, LoyaltyOne, Maelyn Angulo, Manager of Customer Experience Strategy, Capital One, Philip Scrutton, Vice President of Shopper Inisghts, BrandSpark International, Kyle Davies, Director of Marketing Research, Bond Brand Loyalty

…Yes, you read that correctly – a female moderator, and 3 women and 2 men on the panel.  Diverse panels ARE possible if you decide you will have them!

  • We need speed and automation to data into the hands of a business in a timely manner
  • Story telling and graphics are now mainstream
  • Data integration is still key but information remains in silos
  • Limit your research objectives to 2 or 3 of the items you really need to focus on. If you have more, then split them into separate projects. Think about your end product at every phase of the research. How will it translate into a report? Can we condense things into a reasonable space for reporting. The best study is a horrible study if you can’t report on it properly.
  • Lisa de Lima says their surveys are FIVE MINUTES! [In other words, don’t say it isn’t possible because it is.]
  • Get to THE answer not an answer. 
  • Push back against ‘just add one more question’
  • If you want to be believed, you need credibility. You get this by speaking to people on the frontline, speak to the sales team, the client service team, let everyone help shape strategy.
  •  Use dashboards to deliver results in realtime – let them see it before the presentation, let them drill down on relevant filters, and use this to elevate the conversation. Now you can dig deeper because everyone has seen the data they want and need to see.
  • Don’t just stick to the RFP. Think about how you can integrate findings from other projects and data. DOn’t just deliver numbers. Bring storytelling to make the data meaningful.
  • You were hired because they trust you. So tell them the answers quickly and clearly, and move the report presentation into a discussion to offer real value.
  • Give vendors enough background information so they can speak on your behalf, knowing what you know and knowing your take on the results
  • Let your researchers visit other areas of the company – the call center, client service, etc. Invite them to visit to they truly understand the business
  • Project management is table steaks. Make sure a new researcher can read a report and pull out the key point, the elevator story, the research objective. Can they tell an appropriate story about it.
  • [Currently having a candy fight with my neighbour. I WILL WIN THIS BATTLE!]
  • Data isn’t complicated. Storytelling, however, is hard. Use designers, internal or external. Marketers are good storytellers and researchers need to learn this skill as well. [I really think researchers don’t get what story telling means. It’s not like writing a kids book.]
  • What are the meaningful bits? What make sense.
  • There’s not one right way to get to a story. If you work off data tables or the dashboard or the report itself, just make sure it works.
  • Don’t just visit or go on sales calls, TELL people you visit and go on sales calls. 
  • Reports need to be quick, digestible, and FUN.
  • Use a designer to prepare infographics, images. Personalize the insights.
  • Marry attitudinal with behavioural that the client knows about
  • Don’t present every single piece of data just because you can. Focus on the real objective and answer just those questions. Then it is a crisp focused report. [You can put the rest in the appendix]
  • CEO needs one slide, other people need different or more slides. Create the right report for the person you are talking to.

Like that? Read these!

#MRIA2017 Opening Keynote: The Age of Disruption by Scott Stratten, Expert in Un-Marketing and NOOOOOO [Excellent!]

Live note-taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in Toronto. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Scott Stratten on twitter

  • [100% hipster takes the stage including jeans, sloppy shirt, tattoos, beard, and man bun]
  • He is known as the creator of the NOOOOOO button which gets millions of users and views with an average 27 second view. The site does pretty much nothing but say NOOOOOOO. It is the number one site on google for any version of the word ‘no’ that contains more than one o,
  • Many people feel guilted, stupid, slow about being brought into the social media, digital world. Huge pressure to stay up to date with every channel but it’s impossible.
  • You do NOT have to use every platform. If you don’t like it, don’t use it even if you want to feel cool and hip.
  • When we say the word millenial, we mean people younger than us and we don’t like you. [yeah, i have to agree. We’ve built a wall there.]. This happens with every generation. Every newest generation is the worst generation.
  • We’ve created a bias of ageism that is allowed. But it’s not a good thing. We use it in hiring. We assume young people don’t know. We assume older people aren’t tech savvy.  Our industry depends on this. We see younger people as a threat.
  • We hear things like millenials hate meetings and love to travel. Well, who doesn’t? This is just a bias of interpretation. We need to give comparative numbers. Millenials are more civial minded, cause minded, want to work for non-profits.
  • The shift is not an age shift. EVERYONE is making communication changes so we need to figure out what customers want to do. Don’t say old people don’t text because they do, they just do it differently. Your customer should decide what channel they want to use. If someone emails you, then email them back instead of demanding a phone call.
  • People like the written record of text, DM/PMs, emails. 
  • Know the speed of response expected by each method and respect those.
  • Brands hop onto trends, often the surface of the trend. Put quotes on pictures, use influencers, newsjacking. But you must do it right. You CAN’T capitalize on death, terror, even if it’s ‘just a joke.’ Offer condolences, help not jokes. Consumers have the power to react, to choose where they open their wallet.
  • Viral isn’t about a million views. It’s about 100 views with the exact right audience. Newsjack with originality.
  • Ethics are not a renewable resource.  What is the first thing that comes to mind when people think about your brand? Your horrid, distasteful ad?
  • The problem with live video – most people are not filmable, don’t want to be on video, they’re modest or humble. Most people aren’t that interesting, particularly when it comes to streaming live. 
  • Contextual content – does the content match the sharing method – concerts, sports, backstage at awards ceremonies. Most other things do not. Interviews with your VP – NO!  We want to do it to look hip because we can. But should we? Does it help your brand? 
  • Branding is no long real time. It’s NOW time. A response in 3 minutes vs 3 hours can make all the difference. What if an airline responded to your complaint 3 days later – you’d be even angrier. Authentic and transparent are important but speed is paramount.  Great responses are disarming because most other responses are terrible.
  • When people complain, they want validation and to be heard. They want the attention that they weren’t getting otherwise.  At least recognize the issue immediately.
  • Vanity metrics make you feel great and amount to nothing,  Metrics must move the needle for your client.
  • Don’t write books to sell them, write books to share knowledge.
  • [Scott is a very entertaining speaker. Lots of fun stories. Look for his Unpodcast with Alison Kramer]

Like that? Read these!

Should market researchers measure the conscious or unconscious mind? #MRX #NewMR

Measuring the unconscious through implicit techniques is in-vogue right now, and I’ll admit that I’ve been a huge fan of them for a couple decades, ever since I got to use a tachistoscope in university. Implicit techniques are based on the premise that people’s feelings, opinions, and attitudes are often not accessible to basic awareness. You’re probably most familiar with this in terms of people not recognizing or admitting that they are sexist, racist, homophobic, or xenophobic. Or, at least, the extent to which they are —ist or —ic.

Oh yes, I HAD to choose an iceberg image. The world needs to see another 83 trillion of them before we pick a new image. 🙂

Implicit techniques often entail having people do word or image comparisons at super-high speeds. For instance, you might ask people to assign one set of 100 words (e.g., adventurous, bewildered, debonair, heroic, birthday balloons, seaside, pyramids) to a couple of brands in under a minute. A choice must be made for every single word. The reasoning behind this technique is that decisions are made too quickly for logical thought to occur. Rather, gut feelings, the unconscious mind, the reptilian brain, are the only processes being accessed.

But what about this scenario?

I KNOW I am sexist, racist, homophobic, and xenophobic. I was raised in that culture and it is embedded in me. Growing up, I saw sexism and racism all over the media and, today, I see homophobia and xenophobia all over media. At this point in my life, it would be massively hard to make that part of me disappear. Fortunately, what I can do, and what I have done, is to recognize that part of me so damn fast that it has miniscule effects on my actions. I know these biases exist in every socialized human being (ah, the innocence of babies who haven’t yet been taught to be biased!) and I actively tell myself that those feelings are wrong. I’ve actively moved the treatment of those thoughts and feelings from the unconscious to the conscious.

Which brings me to my main point. It doesn’t make sense to always and only measure the unconscious. Why? Because my actions will demonstrate a completely different story than my unconscious brain will reveal. Implicit testing may suggest that I wouldn’t be amenable to a person, brand, service, or company, but then, low and behold, there I am endorsing, using, and buying it. My biased brain is contradicting the scientifically developed prediction algorithm that says I will not open my wallet.

I hope you’ll take a couple of lessons from this.

  • Never forgo implicit techniques for explicit techniques. Both are always mandatory or you will have gaps in your understandings and treatments. You need to know what biases and conscious decisions relate to your brand.
  • Accept that human beings, including you, have negative biases. And that’s not a bad thing. The only bad thing is being unable to recognize and being unwilling to accept those biases.
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