Questionning mobile methods and contradictory data #MRIA2017 


Live note taking at the #MRIA2017 conference in toronto. Any  errors or bad jokes are my own.

Bridging the Survey vs. Sales Data Disconnect

Mariangelica Rodriguez, Consumer Insights Manager, PepsiCo Beverages Canada, William Pink, Chairman, Kantar Millward Brown – Marketing Science Council

  • The difference between what people say and do can be large, especially when you match opinions to home scan data
  • This type of data can get hidden because marketers don’t know how to deal with it
  • Is something in the system broken? 
  • Is there a better and different approach to monitor brand performance. What signals should be measured in the short term? Is an ongoing tracker survey necessary? How do you evolve from a survey mindset to a connected data intelligence mindset?
  • Businesses want speed to insight, connected data, less asking and more observing, migration from descriptive to prescriptive, more accurate and granular understanding
  • Need faster decision making, quarterly used to be frequent but now we need days or minutes
  • Data should never be treated in a vacuum disregarding all other pieces of data
  • Consider setting up alerts for when data moves outside a defined margin
  • We may live in a survey first world but its surround first and survey second – use search and social data for signals of campaign impact and brand strength
  • Use intuitive associations, speed of response tests to understand how people feel about brands ad services, tells a completely different story than surveys [I LOVE implicit data because people can’t and don’t want to tell you the truth]

Swipe Right > T2B: How Incorporating User Design from Tinder and Uber Can Improve Mobile Research

Kevin Hare, Vice President, Dig Insights Inc.

  • Mobile devices have matured – swipes, menu stacks, pinch to zoom. Consumers have a new set of behaviours to indicate preferences and make decisions.
  • 19% of surveys are mobile optimized, 55% have bad design that leads ot poor survey experience  [it is SHOCKING that we choose to do this.]
  1. Tinder is a dating app with simple interface – swipe left or right. You can swipe right or left on products too. Or on features, brands, services. Intuitive interest is a quick swipe right.  Considered interest means you read the description first. Intuitive rejection means a quick swipe left. Considered rejection means you read it then reject it. Process is intuitive. Survey questions often correlate which means you’re asking too many questions. This method helps that problem. Can replicate box scores with this data. Can also do network maps and correspondent maps.
  2. Chatbots. Way to access information, make decisions, and communicate. Beginning of a new form of digital access. People spend most of their time on just five downloaded apps. Conversation is a natural user interface. Not much too learn. AI tools aren’t perfect but they are exploding. 80% of people like the experience which is 4 times more than survey numbers.
  3. Google maps.  Your phone defaults to tracking you.  Google can make much of this information available to you via APIs.  Use it to track purchases. Pick the date you went shopping, identify how you paid. Then go to google maps and choose the location you went to.  Helps with recall, you can check the map to see where you were that day. Engaging map deliverables for your clients.
  4. Ratings. Feedback loops from simple five start rating system returns many metrics on how to improve service.  Use a system like this at end of survey. Give a star rating. Give a few easy prompts for what did you like or dislike. This is how uber does it, also hotel ratings. Step 1, choose overal satisfaction. Step 2, choose the satisfied features. Step 3, choose the dissatisfied features.

Bridging the Marketing & Research Chasm

Neil Rennert, Marketing Research and Consumer Insights Manager, Canada Dry Mott’s, Juliann Ng, Vice President Consulting, GfK

  • Ask a question three ways – from the client perspective (e.g., to get a bonus), from the business perspective, from the research perspective. 
  • “A more beautiful question” book to consider reading
  • We’re sort of trained to just answer the question, don’t challenge the question. The questions you asked are shaped by your experiences. 
  • Try asking ‘why’ a few more times, not just once or twice. 
  • Think about opening and closing. Close an open ended question and you’ll get a brand new perspective. You could get contradictory answers. 
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