Jobs to be Done: A Roadmap for Customer-Centered Innovation by Stephen Wunker, New Markets Advisors


Live note-taking at the November 10, 2016, webinar. Any errors are my own.

  • People aren’t just buying products or services, they are trying to get things done, many ways to get these things done
  • How can we sell more ice cream? No calories, better distribution. Now think about you personally the last time you had ice cream, why did you have it? Completely different answers, nice way to end the evening, bribe the kids, want to cool down after a run, playgrounds, coffee, cigarettes, beer are the competition. It’s not an ice-cream company and the competition is much broader.
  • Can do job quicker and faster because you’re more targeted on what needs to be done
  • Need to know why consumers prioritize certain jobs and why they buy the things they buy
  • When: understand target markets fully and meet the needs of multiple stakeholders
  • How: address root causes and specific use cases
  • Why: broad solution space base don both functional and emotional insights
  • Discover the jobs, what do stakeholders want to accomplish, what are the pain points and current approaches but don’t start there are you will miss the why
  • Identify the success criteria and investigate the obstacles, go into detailed planning
  • Assess the value and beat the competition, do NOT start by trying to beat the competition
  • Credit card company – are you in the ‘gold card’ segment? Not very sophisticated. Add demographics which isn’t much better. Maybe go further with ten life-stage segments (college students, couple with baby) but this is not all that predictive for a gold credit card. Company really wanted to attract high spenders – business travelers, small business owners who put business charges on personal cards, these are very different people. Not everyone is seeking more even though that’s what we’re trying to give them. Business travelers might want instead preferential events so they can connect with their family at home.
  • Toothpaste – satisfies a very specific job. Is Wisp the worst toothbrush? It’s hardly a toothbrush at all. But it’s a huge category success. Has a very clear view of the customer. People who travel during the day and it’s hard to brush your teeth when you’re away, don’t want to carry a wet toothbrush. You don’t need a dental hygiene cleaning, you need to make sure there’s no broccoli in your teeth. Can’t be bulky. Have to be okay with throwing it away. [Darn, they almost had me until I heard it’s disposable]
  • Décor Aid redefined the norm by focusing on hundreds or low thousands of dollars clients, not hundreds of thousands. Value of freshening a living room before a party. Give you a newly interesting den. No obvious competition other than DIY and maybe it looking like DIY.
  • Go from big to narrow, get more targeted over time.
  • Case study – prepared food company expanding product portfolio. Functional job – budget, nourish, reduce time on menial tasks, eat healthy. Emotional job – unwind, bond, try new things, variety, demonstrate caring, express creativity. Makes more sense to start with the emotional jobs in this case – “feed yourself” isn’t very useful. Success criteria – tasty, filling, healthy, easy, fresh, variety. Obstacles – lack of energy, lack of ideas, distractions, cravings, timing. There are industry benchmarks and you have to be prepared to break those so you can stand alone a bit. Myth – couples want quick meals is more correctly couples want easy meals.
  • Jobs To Be Done goes different than needs or features. It’s only one piece of understanding the market. Don’t compete on features.
  • Map the entire process of customer behaviour and keep digging to get a root causes. Be a kindergartner and keep asking why why why. Create a hierarchy of stakeholder jobs and priorities. Satisfy both functional and emotional jobs.
  • Get out of the conference room and talk to actual people. people have a hard time telling you these kinds of things on a questionnaire. You can quantify context and experience, you can ask about frequencies. And then qualitative gives you the full experience
  • Two segments is probably too simplistic and too many is unreasonable. Direct mail gives you more options for more segments. 4 to 7 is probably a good balance to exploit richness of the world but not getting over detailed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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