Neuroscience and growing employee engagement with research #MRIA16 


Touch to sell: neuromarketing’s full toolkit to captivate the senses by Diana Lucaci

  • We need to bring more science into the boardroom
  • If I’d asked people what they wanted they would have said faster horses – we need to eliminate bias, eliminate response bias and social desirability
  • System 1 is when you slam on the brakes without thinking
  • We can measure using biometrics or neuroscience – facial expression, eye tracking, heart rate, skin response
  • There are consumer and medical versions of tools, like how a Fitbit is not a medical device
  • Biometrics are unidirectional – it could happen for any reason whether happy sad disgust or fear; this is why you combine with neuroscience
  • You can test physical media like postal boxes and also emails and scent and sound
  • What happens when you add scent to physical media and digital media
  • When you like what you’re looking at there’s more action in the frontal lobe
  • Cognitive load is lower for physical rather than digital
  • Unaided brand recall is better for physical
  • Physical is more persuasive and motivating 
  • Digital captures more attention based on time looking at things, but only because they’re trying to make sense of it which means it’s not as motivating or persuasive
  • Nothing compares to the instore experience, interacting with an item makes you more likely to purchase it
  • Need to make sure your storefront is noticed, eyes are drawn to faces particularly if the face is directly pointed to you, turn the face and people will look at other parts of the ad [how cool is that!]
  • Look at the CBC marketplace episode on retail tricks – how stores make you spend more
  • Decision fatigue is real
  • Sell to your tribe not to everyone
  • visual attention is automatic and quick
  • Humanize your customers and create mobile experiences that delight and add value to their lives


From survey to engagement – a journey of research and organization evaluation by Claude Andres and Amy Charles

  • Regularly get Canada’s top employer awards
  • Rely on data from employee survey to do this
  • Old program was “father knows best”, HR would tell everyone what to be happy about
  • Established a sample survey in 2006 and then redid a census survey in 2007 to include every ministry, 2009 added signifciant demographic data
  • How do you measure firefighters, swimming instructors, and policy analysts who are all employees
  • They need a common language but they need to talk to completely different kinds of people
  • Needed to work on data collection AND reporting
  • Reports used to show lots of numbers and metrics and they were boring [DATA IS NEVER BORING!  :) ]
  • Reports evolved into guidebooks supported by data portals
  • Broken window theory – if you break one window, lots of kids will keep doing it. Must stop it before it grows
  • Don’t make assumptions too quickly – surveys kept asking about fairness of hiring and people always said no. We think they don’t understand how boring works so let’s teach them what we do. But it turns out the more they knew the unhappier they got. But even people who got the job didn’t like the process.
  • Happy employees do not equal engaged employees
  • When the metric is the measure, you’re on a slippery slope. If you watch your speedometer so you don’t speed, you will get into an accident.
  • Can’t change compensation without getting input and informing ahead of time, people need to learn ahead of time and be given time to understand
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