Improvements to survey modes #PAPOR #MRX 


What Are They Thinking? How IVR Captures Public Opinion For a Democracy, Mary McDougall, Survox

  • many choices, online is cheapest followed by IVR followed by phone interview
  • many still do not have internet – seniors, non-white, low income, no high school degree
  • phone can help you reach those people, can still do specific targeting
  • good idea to include multiple modes to test for any mode effects
  • technology is no longer a barrier for choosing a data collection strategy
  • ignoring cell phones is poor sampling
  • use labor startegically to allow IVR
  • tested IVR on political polling, 300 completes in 2.5 hours, met the quotas, once a survey was started it was generally completed

The Promising Role of Fax in Surveys of Clinical Establishments: Observations from a Multi-mode Survey of Ambulatory Surgery Centers, Natalie Teixeira, Anne Herleth, and Vasudha Narayanan, Weststat; Kelsey O’Yong, Los Angeles Department of Public Health

  • we often want responses from an organization not a company
  • 500 medical facilities, 60 questions about staffing and infection control practices
  • used multimode – telephone, postal, web, and fax
  • many people requested the survey by fax and many people did convert modes
  • because fax was so successful, reminder calls were combined with fax automatically and saw successful conversions to this method
  • this does not follow the current trend
  • fax is immediate and keeps gatekeepers engaged, maybe it was seen as a novelty
  • [“innovative fax methodology” so funny to hear that phrase. I have never ever ever considered fax as a methodology. And yet, it CAN be effective.🙂 ]
  • options to use “mass” faxing exist

The Pros and Cons of Persistence During Telephone Recruitment for an Establishment Survey, Paul Weinfurter and Vasudha Narayanan, Westat

  • half of restaurant issues are employees coming to work ill, new law was coming into effect regarding sick pay
  • recruit 300 restaurants to recruit 1 manager, 1 owner, and a couple food preparers
  • telephone recruitment and in person interviews, english, spanish, mandarin, 15 minutes, $20 gift card
  • most of the time they couldn’t get a manager on the phone and they received double the original sample of restaurants to contact
  • it was assumed that restaurants would participate because the sponsor was health inspectors, but it was not mandatory and they couldn’t be told it was mandatory, there were many scams related to this so people just declined, also all of the health inspectors weren’t even aware of the study
  • 73% were unreachable after 3 calls, hard to get a person of authority during open hours
  • increased call attempts to five times, but continued on when they thought recruitment was likely
  • recruited 77 more from people who were called more than 5 times
  • as a result, data were not limited to a quicker to reach sample
  • people called up to ten times remained noncommittal and never were interviewed
  • there wasn’t an ideal number of calls to get maximum recruits and minimum costs
  • but the method wasn’t really objective, the focus was on restaurants that seemed like they might be reachable
  • possibly more representation than if they had stopped all their recruitment at five calls
  • [would love to see results crossed by number of attempts]
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