Questionning the questionnaire – using games to real self-report biases by Amber Brown and Joe Marks #CASRO #MRX


Live blogging from Nashville. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

– surveys that aren’t well designed have social desirability bias, aspirational biases, demand characteristics, satisficing
– games can help with some of these if they are properly designed
– purchase/visit intent can have problems as people want to please you, are aspirational in their answers with little follow through, similar to charitable giving and exercise
– study asked about prior and future behaviour of behaviours
– people were offered either cash or theme park tickets and then asked whether they planned to visit the park – would they take the cash (they probably won’t go) or would they take the tickets (they probably will go) (Cash is always less)
– for a charity company – will you donate your incentive to a charity or take the cash (cash is always less)
– for an exercise company – will you take a sports authority gift card or a cash incentive (cash is always less)
– for readership – will you take a book store gift card or cash
– the incentive choice was a good predictor of the intent question
– games engage instinctual thinking. you’re just trying to win. people play games every day. it’s faster and gives less time for biases to creep in
– the test is actual choice behaviour which his similar to the marketplace
– would you be willing to donate to wikipedia? real case study – do you want $10 in cash or donate $50 to wikipedia. 14% chose the 10$ donation but 2% chose the $30 donation
– the game comes much closer to real behaviour
– can help to counter biases that poorly designed surveys may have

[i want to read the paper on this one. very cool!]

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