Neuro to Big Data to Segmentation: Multi-mode wins #ESOMAR #MRX


esomarLive blogging from #ESOMAR Congress 2014 in Nice, France. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.

Car Clinics 3.0: Designing better cars by peering into the consumers brains by Fatima El-khatib, haystack International, Belgium, Ronny Pauwels, Toyota Motor Europe, Belgium, Wim Hamaekers, haystack International, Belgium

  • Something didn’t feel right about a car they were test driving, but they didn’t quite know what
  • How do you measure the unconscious? Combine qual quant and something new, neuromarketing
  • Customers don’t say what they do and they don’t do what they say. So why ask them everything.
  • Protypes were highly confidential so couldn’t use them. Had to use older available materials.
  • EEG captures long term engagement and relevance, based on avoidance and approach theory
  • Lab test showed computer generated images, 5 views of the exterior, 8 views of the interior, film was about 3 minutes
  • People liked the wheels of one vehicle but not much else. For the other vehicle, everything was fine and average.
  • Because of biometric results, focused on the specific positive and negative features
  • Verbal results shows little differences between the vehicles but EEG showed one vehicle had much more positive feelings. Could see the specific details that people were not able to express verbally.
  • What about asking people about the fabric and dashboard ornaments.
  • VW Polo and Hyundai ornaments performed well but Citroen and Peugeot 208 performed awful based on Galvanic Skin Response.
  • Consumers have difficulty expressing everything verbally. Overall engagement doesn’t matter, it’s all the individual elements that matter. Even the tiniest details of a car can have a huge effect.
  • Neuro is now an official tool for Toyota. They look at the same business questions from different angles. It helps to optimize the car development process.
  • Neuro is not the holy grail – multi-mode is the holy grail. You still need experimental research designs.
  • Be brave, be daring, use the new techniques and see if/which ones add value.

Communication Analytics: Effectiveness Research for Conversion Based Campaign Planning:  How to measure effects of (offline) campaigns on web visits sales and conversion by Erik Prins, Validators, Netherlands
Iris van Dam, Validators, Netherlands, Martin Leeflang, Validators, Netherlands, Sander Pot, Ticketveiling, Netherlands

  • “Moneyball” with Brad Pitt is all about big data. Baseball is all statistics. Used all the statistics to put together an unlikely team that came second place in the end. Cost per player was $250 000 when other teams paid 2.5 million per player.
  • Can we do money ball in a media campaign.
  • Can you correlate campaigns and web visitors, sales, and conversion. Of course. Can calculate cost per anything – media, shopper, clicks.
  • Know the media schedules by the minute, TV, radio, everything. Know all sales, new and old customers.
  • Import all this data into one platform. Calculate cost per mille – how much to reach one thousand people. Cost per sales, cost per shopper, cost per click.
  • Calculate how many people visited website after commercials over an entire year – It cost 0.25E to get someone to their website for one specific channel. Another channel ended up at 12E per customer.  The time of day matters, midday was so much cheaper.
  • Online is winning in Netherlands because they can measure views and clicks.
  • Outdoor advertising is activating existing customers. For new clients, you need TV and radio. Online media is more expensive
  • For Ticketveiling, the win it midday programming. Outdoor format was highway signs. Radio target was a few very specific channels.  Don’t burst all your funds at once, drip your funds is much cheaper.
  • There is less need for traditional research now, need to shift into research consulting, and clients understand this more.

New Perspectives: How a segmentation provided new ways of looking at consumers thereby unlocking sales potential by Alastair Liptrot, Simplot, Australia, Neale Cotton, The Lab Strategy & Planning, Australia, Paul Labagnara, The Lab Strategy & Planning, Australia, Peter Stuchberry, Nature Research, Australia

  • Start somewhere different if you want to end up somewhere different. Try starting at the end. How will you apply your research in the end?
  • Invest your money in a safe bank or lose it all at a casino. Or invest it in a segmentation [I much prefer the segmentation option🙂 ]
  • Simplot is products in Australia in the freezer, to chiller, to house
  • Normally small packs, large packs, kiddie packs. Need to look beyond demographics
  • Most don’t have longevity or are only demo based, and may not complement existing tools or data.
  • Had to work with current categories and brands, as well as future brands.
  • developed four pillars – involvement – how much you love cooking 2) health 3) convenience 4) value
  • Decided on 8 segment model.
  • used Nielsen homescan – people who scan all their supermarket purchases. tagged everyone with a segment, used personality, demographics
  • Had to inspire the team to embrace the segmentation. Need to make the people feel a part of it, encourage acceptance and engagement. Had them engage from the very beginning. Include them in naming the segments so they truly understand what the segments are.  Created a game show for the marketing team to better understand the segments and how to use them.
  • Delivered 30 million in revenue for a $250000 investment
  • The project would have gone on the shelf if they hadn’t though about how they would use it in the end
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