A “How-To” Session on Modularizing a Live Survey for Mobile Optimization by Chris Neal and Roddy Knowles #FOCI14 #MRX


Live blogging from the #FOCI14 conference in Universal City. Any errors or bad jokes are my own.foci14

A “How-To” Session on Modularizing a Live Survey for Mobile Optimization
Chris Neal, CHADWICK MARTIN BAILEY 
& Roddy Knowles, RESEARCH NOW

  • conducted a modularized survey for smartphone survey takers, studied hotels for personal travel and tablets for personal use, excluded tablet takers to keep the methodology clean
  • people don’t want to answer a 20 minute survey on a phone but clients have projects that legitimately need 20 minutes of answers
  • data balanced and weighted to census
  • age was the  biggest phone vs computer difference
  • kept survey to 5 minutes, asked no open ended questions, minimize the word count, break grids into individual questions to avoid burden of scrolling and hitting a tiny button with a giant finger
  • avoid using a brand logo even though you really want to. space is at a premium
  • avoid flash on your surveys, avoid images and watermarks, avoid rich media even though it’s way cool – they don’t always work well on every phone
  • data with more variability is easier to impute – continuous works great, scale variables work great, 3 ordinal groups doesn’t work so well, nominal doesn’t work so well at all
  • long answer options lists are more challenging – vertical scrolling on a smartphone is difficult, affects how many options responders choose, ease of fewer clicks often wins out
  • branching is not your friend. if you must branch, have the survey programmers account for the missing data ahead of time, impute all the top level variables and avoid imputing the bottom level branched variables
  • Predictive mean matching works better than simply using a regression model to replace missing data
  • hot decking (or data stitching which combines several people into one)  replaces missing data with that from someone who looks the same, worked really well though answers to “other” or “none of the above” didn’t work as well
  • hot decking works better if you have nominal data
  • good to have a set of data that EVERYONE answers
  • smartphone survey takers aren’t going away, we need to reach people on their own terms, we cannot force people into our terms
  • we have lots of good tools and don’t need to reinvent the wheel. [i.e., write shorter surveys gosh darn it!!!]

Other Posts

%d bloggers like this: