Emotions and Client Priorities #MRMW #MRX


Welcome to this series of live blogs from the Market Research in the Mobile World Conference in Cincinnati. With so many sessions, I’m only blogging about a few sessions each day. All posts appear within minutes after the speaker has finished. Any errors, omissions, or silly side comments are my own.  I’ll also be providing end of day summary blog posts for Esomar so keep your eyes peeled for those as well.

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David Johnson Decooda: Emotions to Business Value

  • “I’m willing to pay for anything as long as I don’t already know it”  [seriously? then why are you running surveys?]
  • Basic sentiment – relates to social media or mobile. It’s not just thumbs up and thumbs down.
  • Emotions have affect and valence: WHAT is the emotion and how STRONG is it.
  • Profiles include psychographics, demographics, and personas. And it changes all the time.
Bryan Dorsey, John Deers; Mark Lloyd – P&G; Michelle Lemiere, Alcon Labs: Client Priorites and Vendor Value
  • [This is a panel discussion. my comments aren’t attributed to individual people]
  • Focus on your core competency and tell why what you do is different and why we should focus on it
  • Vendors are anxious to work with you and then clients have to rewrite the reports to be relevant to your company, clients can tell a junior person who doesn’t know the business wrote the report
  • Some clients just want better than “gut.” Don’t have time or money for a full report.
  • Clients need the unfiltered view of consumers, whatever the methodology
  • Clients would trade the technology or the method to work with the right people
  • Clients most impressed when vendors bring insights to the table right at the beginning [do you mean free research? ask chuck chaprapani about that🙂 ]
  • Not impressed with breadth. Prefer we do this one thing really really well. [agree, do everything kinda crappy or one thing right. otherwise it feels like carpet bombing]
  • Vendor says  “Here is what we need” and client responds “here is what we do.” This is completely unacceptable.
  • Clients use case studies and word of mouth to find/choose vendors
  • Pay for performance is a difficult model because good research leaves you with even more questions.
  • Procurement is the dad on the porch holding the shotgun
  • If you claim you are a global company that you ought to be global with offices in each country, and you actually work with the people in your other offices
Roxana Strohmenger: Forrester
  • A group discussion of what we’ve learned so far
  • Mobile is a disruptive device, our environments are no longer device free, 40% of consumers use their smartphone on the toilet
  • By 2016, 70% of the worlds population will have a mobile subscription
  • Consumers are already using mobile to answer survey whether we want them to or not, even the really long, really complicated surveys.
  • Can we be device agnostic? Will your research work on smartphones, tablets, laptops…
  • Once methods are device agnostic, can you really combine the data as if there are no differences there. [fabulous point]
  • Device agnosticity is a necessity but don’t do it when it’s not the right thing to do
  • Websites know when you’re viewing a website on a phone or a laptop so why don’t surveys do this?
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